In the News
In a striking advance that helps open the door to organ transplants from animals, researchers have created gene-edited piglets cleansed of viruses that might cause disease in humans.
BV is the most prevalent gynecological infection in the United States among women ages 15 to 44, with more than 4 million women treated annually.
Birmingham is one of 13 cities in the United States to join the Paris Declaration to end the spread of AIDS by 2030
UAB Hospital is again ranked among the nation's best healthcare providers. UAB's ongoing commitment to research and new medical developments for treating cancer, including efforts to bring technically advanced forms of cancer-killing radiation to Alabama, are among the reasons that UAB Hospital is consistently ranked among the industry's best healthcare providers.
For University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Doctor of Nursing Practice student Sabrina Kopf, ACNP-BC, and her husband and fellow DNP student Scott Kopf, ACNP-BC, the university's 2017 summer commencement ceremony and doctoral hooding Saturday, Aug. 12, is just the next step in their lives together.
A pilot project at the University of Alabama at Birmingham will use telehealth to connect ostomy patients with providers for support and guidance during the crucial 30 days after discharge.
The Alabama state legislature passed “Leni’s Law” last April, making it legal to use CBD oil to treat seizure disorders and other severe medical conditions.
The inhibitor blocks a key virulence enzyme in the oral bacterium Streptococcus mutans, making it unable to stick to a tooth surface
University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have created a small molecule that prevents or impedes tooth cavities in a preclinical model. The inhibitor blocks the function of a key virulence enzyme in an oral bacterium, a molecular sabotage that is akin to throwing a monkey wrench into machinery to jam the gears.
“Accidents can happen to anyone, and storing firearms that are unlocked and loaded is extremely dangerous.”
For four days in late July, pastors, deacons and folks running church kitchens and health ministries gathered in the Birmingham church to discuss a range of issues, including health concerns disproportionately affecting African Americans in their congregations and communities.
The Helen Keller Art Show, on display at the Edge of Chaos conference space at UAB through August 31, features 28 works made by Alabama children from birth to age 21 who have been identified as having a visual impairment, as partially sighted or having low vision, or as blind or deaf blind.
Aissah Kaba worked in the lab of Alan Eberhardt, Ph.D., professor of biomedical engineering in the UAB School of Engineering, fashioning three-dimensional thermoplastic polymer scaffolds for bone repair.
New research published in Epilepsia, a journal of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), suggests that an investigational neurological treatment derived from cannabis may alter the blood levels of commonly used antiepileptic drugs. It is important for clinicians to consider such drug interactions during treatment of complex conditions.
The participants are also taking other seizure drugs while they are receiving the investigational therapy, investigators checked the blood levels of their other seizure drugs to see if they changed. “With any new potential seizure medication, it is important to know if drug interactions exist and if there are labs that should be monitored while taking a specific medication,” said lead author Dr Tyler Gaston.
Too often, people don’t want to lock guns because they don’t think accidents will happen and they want their firearms immediately available and ready to use, said David Schwebel of the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
It’s an urgent problem, with the forecast that about one-fifth of the world’s population will be obese in less than 10 years.
August has “all ingredients for a stew of blues,” said Joshua Klapow, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the School of Public Health at The University of Alabama at Birmingham.
And when a high-visibility sport is suddenly gone, a jarring sense of loss fills the void. The absence is felt not only by the students who couldn't play football, but also by a school trying to grow, a community trying to repair its reputation — and everyone touched by both.
After being shut down in December of 2014, the UAB Football program fought to get reinstated in 2015. Since then, the program has undergone significant changes in their run to #TheReturn in 2017. Head Coach Bill Clark and former players return to the program and document the journey and bond to the city and school that embraced their revival.
The transition from summer break back to school can be tough for everyone; but for families of children with special needs, Jennifer Kilgo, Ph.D., professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Education, says concerns about the back-to-school transition can be even more intensified.
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