Research - News
Despite financial incentives, the HITECH Act, signed into law in 2009, had a weak impact on the uptake of EHRs.
Southern favorites like fried chicken and bacon may taste great when consumed, but they can have negative effects on heart health, according to UAB researchers.
UAB Athletics ramps up fundraising with campaign launch event Aug. 18.
An Arizona drug company will patent the small peptide drug.
In JAMA Viewpoint, Edward W. Hook III, M.D., says doctors and patients must be willing to talk about sex if we are to decrease the nation’s rate of sexually transmitted infections.
In a sedentary office environment, participants working in 78° to 80°F temperatures consumed nearly 90 fewer calories than those in a cooler environment.
Until now, no toxin had been found in 132 years of study for the deadly pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which infects 9 million people a year and kills more than 1 million. The novel toxin induces necrotic cell death of macrophages to help the tuberculosis pathogen escape and spread to other cells.
When machines and brains mix, who's in charge? This is the type of problem pondered by neuroethicists such as UAB's Josh May, Ph.D., who examine questions at the crossroads of neuroscience and ethics.
Play is an important part of child development, and a UAB student research project shows that disparities exist between play spaces depending on where one lives.
Phillip D. Smith, M.D., has been awarded a two-year, $200,000 grant from the DeGregorio Family Foundation to study the bacteria in children’s stomachs that potentially protects them from stomach cancer.
The School of Education looks to enhance learning outcomes, health and wellness of P-12 population, as well as of adults in Alabama and around the world.
The challenge is to stifle the binding of inhibitory antibodies but retain activity of a blood enzyme.
UAB research shows that phytoplankton, the foundation of all marine life, will experience varied growth rates due to ocean acidification levels during the next century.

A product designed by UAB engineers to help save lives during natural disasters is approved for use.

UAB’s ongoing research for countermeasures to bromine or chlorine exposure — from either industrial spills or chemical attack — gets a boost with a new NIH grant.

Epidemiologist Olivia Affuso studies new ways to prevent obesity and chronic disease through physical activity. She also volunteers with two groups that use running to help women and girls achieve fitness and personal goals.
Haydeh Payami, Ph.D., a leading geneticist recruited to the UAB-Hudson Alpha Center for Genomic Medicine and UAB Personalized Medicine Institute, is exploring the protective power of coffee and nicotine — and the mysteries of the microbiome — in Parkinson’s disease.
Gene mastermind Shawn Levy, Ph.D., and his team at the HudsonAlpha Genomic Services Laboratory are helping UAB investigators — and researchers from around the world — crack the mysteries of life.
Rates of vision impairment are high among seniors living in subsidized housing, suggesting an increased need for widespread vision screening.
The mimicry of bone cells by multiple myeloma is driven by overexpression of Runx2, the master regulator of bone formation.
While it is well-known that nonsmokers can get cancer from inhaling smoke, the amount of risk associated with secondhand smoke and stroke has remained unclear until now.
Virginia Wadley, Ph.D., says until this new JAMA study, whether or not stroke survivors are at-risk over the long term was an unknown.
Foods high in fats have long been put into the “unhealthy” category by nutrition experts, but UAB researchers believe this may have been all wrong, all along.
Convergence insufficiency can be mistaken for attention deficit disorder because the inability to focus eyesight can lead to reading and attention problems.
Male and female mice use different immune cells to process chronic pain, indicating that different therapies for different genders could better target the problem.
The school aims to continue offering students cutting-edge opportunities by expanding educational programming, enhancing diversity, growing research dollars and broadening its capacity to help Alabama’s underserved.
The drug inhibits the activity of a kinase enzyme called LRRK2, and it showed no pathology in rat lungs, kidneys or livers.
The LIBERATE Study will further investigate the Eclipse System, the first vaginal insert designed to provide bowel control.
Macrophage cells require agility to scavenge and digest dead cells and prevent an immune response to self. In lupus, the macrophages lose that agility.
A series of fascinating studies at Harvard University showed that many people respond positively to placebo pills — even when they are told that the pills don't have any active ingredients. Now researchers at UAB have partnered with a Harvard scientist to test these "open-label" placebos for the first time in cancer survivors.
Page 39 of 58