Research - News
Immune system cells and a drug used for treating rheumatoid arthritis will be studied in an effort to reduce inflammation in kidney transplants and improve long-term function.
Consuming fried foods and sugar-sweetened beverages is linked to a 50 percent increase in risk of death, according to a new study in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases.
The Quad Rider makes it easy to shift gears and brake, enabling people with poor grip-control to safely cycle.
Consuming a low-carbohydrate diet should be the first step taken by those with diabetes, according to a new study.
Boni Elewski, M.D., led one of two trials featured in the New England Journal of Medicine that show secukinumab is a safe and effective psoriasis treatment.
UAB nutrition scientists launch an intriguing study of inflammation, obesity and infertility in African elephants in U.S. zoos, a study that may have an impact on the survival of the species.
Nepal has high rates of HPV infection, which nearly always causes cervical cancer. UAB research looks at the prevalence and a potential screening method.
Lawrence Sincich, Ph.D., has been awarded $1.1 million to advance the technology for improved optical access and visual testing of the retina.
People trying to lose weight are often told to eat more fruits and vegetables, but new UAB research shows this bit of advice may not be true.
Professor David Schwebel, Ph.D., developed a new virtual-reality system to help reduce pedestrian injuries and deaths among children.
UAB researchers lay out the facts on commonly held but often erroneous obesity myths. Their conclusion? It’s time to move on.
UAB is the first medical center in the Southeast to implant a new type of electrical stimulator to control seizures in patients with epilepsy.
A federally funded study at UAB shows how invading glioma cells disrupt brain connections and break down the blood brain barrier.
Growing a garden helps cancer survivors eat better, but the benefits extend beyond the harvest, UAB study reveals.
Research in personalized medicine, health informatics and genomic medicine spans disciplines and will impact the treatment of many diseases.
The partnership combines genomics expertise with leadership in research and clinical medicine to speed efforts to deliver personalized therapies and cures.

Medical advances and interventions may have helped reduce the effects of obesity on life span, say new results published in Obesity Reviews.

New drugs to slow or even prevent Parkinson’s could be in human studies as early as 2015.
Speakers at the third annual Sustainable Smart Cities Symposium will address needs specific to Birmingham’s growth.
Previous research has found an association between not eating breakfast and obesity; but no large, randomized controlled trials had sought to find causation until now.
An innovative solution for safeguarding personal information relies on your proximity instead of your memory.
UAB researchers have created a blood test that determines a bioenergetic index, which could become an important method of measuring mitochondrial health in patients with chronic disease.
Researchers identify the strategy that highly aggressive brain tumor cells use to fuel their relentless expansion and reveal a fresh target for cancer therapy.
Mayor William Bell and UAB President Ray L. Watts brought Birmingham’s resurgence to TheStreet during a Birmingham Business Alliance economic development trip to New York.
UAB researchers participated in a multi-site study that disproved a once-promising theory that statins might have a beneficial effect on lung function.
HIV may now be a chronic, manageable disease for most patients in the United States, but mothers and children in sub-Saharan Africa are still suffering. One UAB School of Public Health researcher hopes to improve their situation. 
A five-year, $1.72 million grant will help researchers to identify the role of testosterone and cortisol in health and development of preterm infants and find a measure that will reliably predict those infants most at risk for problems later.
New understanding of roundworm reproduction could have impact on human and animal infertility issues, say UAB scientists.
Many people acquire this fungal infection during childhood — but Cryptococcus generally stays dormant in healthy people. It also can re-activate later in life, and one infectious disease expert wants to find out why.
Applications for the NIGMS Short Course on Statistical Genetics & Genomics will be accepted until May 23. The course will be held July 7-11.
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