A Chronological History of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB)
and its Predecessor Institutions and Organizations, 1831-

(Please contact the UAB Archives for additional information.)

Copyright: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

 

The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) traces its roots to the 1859 founding of the Medical College of Alabama and the 1936 opening of the Birmingham Extension Center of The University of Alabama. In 1945 the Medical College of Alabama was moved from Tuscaloosa to Birmingham and the University's Medical Center was founded. Later, in November of 1966, the Extension Center and the Medical Center were merged to form the "University of Alabama in Birmingham," an organizational component of The University of Alabama (in Tuscaloosa). In 1969 UAB became an independent institution, one of the autonomous universities within the newly created three-campus University of Alabama System.

 

Today, UAB is a comprehensive urban university with a nationally recognized academic health center. UAB is the only public, four-year degree granting university in the state's largest metropolitan area. UAB is the largest research institution in the state of Alabama and the university is the largest employer in Birmingham.

 

A comprehensive chronology of the history of The University of Alabama at Birmingham and its predecessor entities is found below.

 

 


Select one of the following to skip to a specific time period.

1900, 1920, 1940, 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2010


1831: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees was created by the Alabama legislature.

April 5, 1859: The Probate Court of Mobile County granted a charter for a medical school with power vested in a board of trustees originally comprised by Drs. Josiah C. Nott, James F. Heustis, William H. Anderson, George A. Ketchum, Francis A. Ross, and Frederick E. Gordon.

November 14, 1859: The Medical College of Alabama opened in Mobile in a rented building. Dr. William H. Anderson was the school's first dean.

January 30, 1860: Act No. 255 of the Alabama Legislature chartered the Medical College of Alabama and appropriated $50,000.00 for purchase of grounds, the erection of buildings, and for necessary contingent expenses. Power for the school was vested with a board of trustees comprised by Newton St. John, J. C. Dubose, Robert A. Baker, William D. Dunn, A. R. Manning, Duke W. Goodman, H. T. Smith, C. R. Foot, Murray F. Smith, Samuel G. Battle, Theophilus L. Toulmin, John Little Smith, Charles Labaron, N. H. Brown, and John Forysth.

March 7, 1860: The first class of 15 graduated from the Medical College of Alabama after a one-year term. Samuel Watson Acton was the school's first graduate.

1861: Classes suspended at the Medical College of Alabama due to the Civil War.

1865: The building of the Medical College of Alabama was occupied by the Federal Government; it later became the headquarters of the local Freedmen's Bureau.

1868: The building of the Medical College of Alabama was returned to the ownership of the college's governing board.

November 1868: Classes that had been suspended during the Civil War resumed at the Medical College of Alabama in Mobile. Dr. William H. Anderson returned as dean.

1869: Following the resumption of the school, five students graduated from the Medical College of Alabama after a one-year term.

January 1884: A group of Birmingham women met at the First Methodist Episcopal Church South and formed the Daughters of the United Charities.

1885: Dr. George A. Ketchum became the second dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

September 1888: The Daughters of the United Charities established a hospital board and began plans for The Hospital of the United Charities.

October 23, 1888: The Hospital of the United Charities, a precursor to Hillman Hospital, opened in Birmingham.

July 12, 1893: The Birmingham Dental College was incorporated by the State. The college opened for instruction that fall.

October 13, 1893: With the start of the new school term, the Medical College of Alabama lengthened requirements for graduation from a two-year to three-year course.

June 9, 1894: The Birmingham Medical College was organized as a proprietary school and incorporated by the state legislature. Drs. John D. S. Davis, William E. B. Davis, William H. Johnston, Benjamin L. Wyman, Sr., Russell M. Cunningham, John C. LeGrande, B. G. Copeland, J. H. McCarty, and Lewis G. Woodson were the original stockholders of the medical school.

October 2, 1894: The Birmingham Medical College opened for its first term with Dr. William H. Johnston as dean. The College was located in the old Lunsford Hotel, a five-story building at 209-211 21st Street North. The college had a three-year course of study.

December 1, 1894: The Hospital of the United Charities (predecessor of the Hillman Hospital) burned to the ground.

1894: The first class of three students graduated from the Birmingham Dental College after a one-year term.

1895: The first graduating class of the Birmingham Medical College was composed of one student, William Josiah Clark, who graduated after a one-year term.

1895: A one-story annex to the main building, housing the microscopy and pathology laboratories, was completed at the Medical College of Alabama.

March 1896: The Hospital of the United Charities was renamed Hillman Hospital in honor of benefactor Thomas T. Hillman, president of the TCI Railroad.

February 11, 1897: The state legislature chartered Hillman Hospital and vested its management in the Board of Lady Managers.

October 11, 1897: Following an announcement of Governor Joseph F. Johnston, the Medical College of Alabama in Mobile became the Medical Department of the University of Alabama (in Tuscaloosa). Control of the program remained with the school’s independent governing board and no funding was forthcoming from the University.

1897: The state legislature confirmed the charter of the Birmingham Medical College.

1898: Dr. Benjamin L. Wyman, Sr., became the second dean of the Birmingham Medical College.

January 1, 1899: Entering freshmen at the Birmingham Medical College were required to attend the college's new four-year course.

March 29, 1899: Elizabeth White of Birmingham graduated from the Birmingham Medical College. She was the school's only female graduate.

October 9, 1899: Entering freshmen at the Medical College of Alabama were required to attend the college's new four-year course.

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October 28, 1901: Ullman School opened. The building is the oldest structure remaining on the UAB campus.

July 12, 1902: Cornerstones were laid for the Birmingham Medical College and the Hillman Hospital.

1902: Dr. John W. Abercrombie became president of The University of Alabama and served until 1911.

1902: A one-story addition to the main building, housing the chemical laboratory, was completed at the Medical College of Alabama.

July 15, 1903: Hillman Hospital was dedicated.

February 28, 1905: Hillman Hospital Training School for Nurses graduated its first class. Elizabeth Hale of Birmingham was the program's first graduate.

October 8, 1906: Dr. Rhett Goode became the third dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

January 1907: The Board of Lady Managers transferred the deed of the hospital land to the Jefferson County Board of Revenue for the purpose of operating the Hillman Hospital.

March 4, 1907: The Alabama Legislature amended the charter of the Medical College of Alabama (in Mobile) to definitely incorporate with and place the school under the control of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. The legislation appropriated $45,000 to the school for repairs, renovations, improvements, and purchases and $5,000.00 annually for maintenance of facilities.

March 6, 1907: The Mobile medical school dissolved its own board of trustees, and The University of Alabama Board of Trustees gained sole control over the Mobile program. The school was officially renamed as the University of Alabama School of Medicine.

1908: A laboratory for comparative anatomy, a one-story wooden structure, was constructed on the property of the Medical College of Alabama, just north of the main medical building.

1910: Dr. Edgar Poe Hogan became the first Hillman Hospital administrator, serving in a part-time capacity until 1930.

1910: The Birmingham Medical College merged with the Birmingham Dental College (which had opened in the fall of 1893) and was renamed the Birmingham Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical College.

1911: Dr. George H. Denny became president of The University of Alabama and served until 1936.

1911: Dr. Eugene DuBose Bondurant became the fourth dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

1912: Dr. Lewis C. Morris, Sr., became the third dean of the Birmingham Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical College.

September 12, 1912: The trustees of the proprietary Birmingham Medical, Dental and Pharmaceutical College transferred all land, buildings, and equipment to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees, who agreed to continue the school until the enrolled students completed their studies.

1913: Hillman Hospital Annex was completed.

May 27, 1915: The last class of 44 graduated from the Birmingham Medical College, and the program was terminated by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

October 2, 1915: Dr. Tucker Henderson Frazer became the fifth dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

1920: Dr. Daniel T. McCall, Sr., became acting dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

April 15, 1920: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees voted to “order the removal” of the medical school from Mobile to Tuscaloosa where the program would be reopened as a two-year preclinical school on the campus of the University.

May 28, 1920: Ten graduates received M.D. degrees from the Medical College of Alabama in the last commencement ceremony held in Mobile. Eleven other graduates received the Bachelor of Science in Medicine degree and two students received degrees in pharmacy.

1920: Medical College of Alabama was transferred from Mobile to The University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa where it was housed in a barracks building and reopened as a two-year basic sciences medical program.

1920: Dr. Clyde Brooks became the first dean of the University of Alabama’s two-year medical school in Tuscaloosa.

May 1921: The first two graduates received B.S. degrees in Medicine from The University of Alabama’s new two-year basic sciences medical program.

1922: Hillman Hospital received its first accreditation.

1922: Josiah Nott Hall was completed on the Tuscaloosa campus as a home to the two-year basic sciences medical program.

May 26, 1925: Jimmie Ethel Montgomery received a B.S. degree in Medicine from The University of Alabama, thus becoming the first female to graduate from the medical school.

1927: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees granted alumni status to all graduates of the Birmingham Medical College.

1928: Dr. Stuart Graves became the second dean of the University of Alabama’s two year medical school in Tuscaloosa. He served until the school was moved to Birmingham in 1945.

January 15, 1929: The New Hillman Building was dedicated.

April 1929: Hillman Hospital School of Nursing Residence was dedicated.

January 1930: Dr. R. F. Lovelady was named the first full-time superintendent of Hillman Hospital.

September 14, 1936: The University of Alabama opened its Birmingham Extension Center in an old house at 2131 6th Avenue North. For the first term, 116 students enrolled.

September 1936: Edward K. Austin became the first director of the University of Alabama Birmingham Extension Center.

1936: Dr. James W. McQueen was named superintendent of Hillman Hospital.

1937: Dr. Richard C. Foster became president of The University of Alabama and served until 1941.

April 11, 1938: Cornerstone was laid after construction began on the Hillman Hospital Outpatient Clinic Building.

December 1938: Groundbreaking was held for Jefferson Hospital.

November 19, 1939: Hillman Hospital Outpatient Clinic Building was dedicated.

1939: The University of Alabama's Birmingham Extension Center had four full-time faculty members and an enrollment of 365 students.

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December 26-30, 1940: Jefferson Hospital was dedicated.

February 1, 1941: Charles R. Skelton, a 43-year old carpenter from Ensley who had helped lay the foundation for the hospital, became the first patient admitted to Jefferson Hospital.

1941: Dr. George H. Denny became president of The University of Alabama -- for a second time -- and served until the following year.

1942: Dr. Raymond R. Paty became president of The University of Alabama and served until December 1946.

March 30, 1942: The 10th and 11th floors of Jefferson Hospital became home to the secret national headquarters of the US Army’s Replacement and School Command (R&SC), which was charged with individual training of officers and enlisted personnel of the infantry, field artillery, cavalry, coast artillery, armored forces, parachute and tank destroyer units. The operation was moved from Washington, DC and was activated in Birmingham on this date. The R&SC remained in Jefferson Hospital until it was moved to Ft. Bragg, North Carolina in April of 1944.

June 8, 1942: As part of the national defense effort during World War II, the medical school in Tuscaloosa instituted an accelerated training program of year-round school containing four sessions of study within a three-year curriculum. New classes began at nine-month intervals.

June 2, 1943: The Jones Bill, Alabama Act 89, authorized an expansion of the two-year Medical College of Alabama to a four-year program and appropriated over $1.3 million for buildings, equipment, and maintenance.

February 16, 1944: The Building Commission for the Four-Year Medical College adopted a resolution locating the new four-year medical school in Birmingham. The Commission had been authorized in 1943 by the Jones Bill (Alabama Act 89) and its nine members had been appointed by Governor Chauncey Sparks.

August 1, 1944: Dr. Roy R. Kracke became first dean of the four-year Medical College of Alabama.

December 1, 1944: Dr. Roger Denio Baker became the medical school's first full-time faculty member and the first departmental chair (pathology) appointed by Dean Roy R. Kracke.

December 20, 1944: The University of Alabama entered into a 99-year contract with Jefferson County for the use of Jefferson and Hillman Hospitals. It also conveyed to the university the land on which the hospitals were located.

1944: Fifty-four students, including three females, graduated as the last class of the two-year basic medical sciences program in Tuscaloosa.

January 1, 1945: Jefferson and Hillman Hospitals were merged to form The University of Alabama’s Jefferson-Hillman Hospital.

March 1945: Mary Ament became librarian of the newly established Medical College Library; she resigned three months later.

June 4, 1945: Twenty-two juniors registered for classes in Jefferson-Hillman Hospital for the new four-year Medical College of Alabama.

June 27, 1945: With the Newton Bill, Alabama Act 207, the state legislature created The University of Alabama School of Dentistry but appropriated no funds for its operation.

September 24, 1945: The two-year basic medical sciences program on the Tuscaloosa campus of The University of Alabama was closed.

September 1945: Mildred R. Crowe became second librarian of the Medical College Library.

October 1, 1945: The unpacking and organization of the library of the medical college began.

October 8, 1945: Classes for freshmen and sophomore medical students began at the new, four-year Medical College of Alabama with the freshman class size limited to 52 students.

1945: Research grants at the Medical College of Alabama totaled $8,900.

1945: Tuition for the Medical College of Alabama was $400 per scholastic year.

1945: Dr. Roy R. Kracke obtained three additional blocks of land adjacent to Jefferson-Hillman Hospital for the development of a medical center.

1945: The Cullom Apartments located at the corner of South 20th Street and 8th Avenue South were acquired for use as student dormitories and as faculty housing.

1945: Dr. Melson Barfield-Carter became chair of the Department of Radiology. She was the first female department head at the Medical Center.

May 1, 1946: By the end of the first year, the medical school employed 172 faculty members, 58 of whom were full-time, four library staff, two hospital executives, and six administrative staff.

August 13, 1946: President Harry S. Truman signed the Hill-Burton Hospital Survey and Construction Act, co-sponsored by Alabama Senator Lister Hill.

October 25, 1946: The first class to graduate from Birmingham with medical degrees had twenty-one students, including Virginia Dare Hamilton, the first female to obtain an MD degree from the Medical College of Alabama.

1946: The University of Alabama's Birmingham Extension Center had an enrollment of over 500 students. The old building on 6th Avenue North could not handle all of the students and instructors, so the University leased space in Phillips High School from the city.

1947: Ralph E. Adams became the acting president of The University of Alabama and served until 1948.

March 12, 1947: Groundbreaking was held at the Medical Center for the Jefferson County Public Health Building.

October 9, 1947: Alabama Act 678 appropriated funds of $750,000 for the operation of the University of Alabama School of Dentistry.

June 1948: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was named first dean of the School of Dentistry.

October 18, 1948: Fifty-two freshmen, all veterans, began classes at the School of Dentistry.

October 1948: A separate library was established for the School of Dentistry.

1948: Drs. Joseph F. Volker and Roy R. Kracke decided to jointly fund and administer the basic science departments.

1948: The Medical Center was awarded $30,000 in research and training grants.

1948: Dr. John M. Gallalee became president of The University of Alabama and served until 1953.

June 3, 1949: The Class of 1949, the first class to spend all four years of medical school in Birmingham, graduated with 24 male and 7 female students.

June 30, 1949: Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in the Medical Center for the Crippled Children's Clinic and Hospital.

September 19, 1949: Alabama Act 596, the Wright-Boutwell Bill, which created The University of Alabama School of Nursing, was signed by Governor James E. Folsom.

October 23, 1949: A groundbreaking ceremony was held at the Medical Center for the Birmingham Veterans Administration Hospital.

November 9, 1949: The Alabama legislature approved plans for a joint medical college and dental school building.

1949: The Jefferson County Public Health Building was dedicated adjacent to the Medical Center.

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January 25, 1950: The first general meeting of the Jefferson-Hillman Hospital Auxiliary was held. Mrs. John M. Bruhn was elected first president of the auxiliary.

January 1950: Dr. Champ Lyons became the first full-time chair of the Department of Surgery.

February 1, 1950: Construction began on the Medical and Dental Basic Science Building and Dental Clinic.

April 7, 1950: An installation banquet was held for the Alabama Alpha Chapter of Alpha Omega Alpha, the national honorary medical society.

June 6, 1950: William R. Anderson received the first graduate degree (in pharmacology) awarded through the Medical Center.

June 27, 1950: Dr. Roy R. Kracke, medical dean, died.

August 1, 1950: Dr. Tinsley R. Harrison became acting dean of the Medical College of Alabama and chair of the Department of Medicine.

September 4, 1950: The entering freshman class of the University Hospital School of Nursing included six male students, the first in the history of the hospital's nursing program. Only one would complete his training and graduate.

December 7, 1950: The first performance of Town and Gown Theater, which had been organized earlier in the year by James F. Hatcher, Jr., was held in the downtown Masonic Temple. "Born Yesterday" starred Tommy Dix, a star of Broadway and Hollywood.

1950: School of Practical Nursing, a nine-month program, was established at Jefferson-Hillman Hospital.

1950: Jefferson-Hillman Hospital School of Nursing, a three-year diploma program, received temporary accreditation from the National League for Nursing.

1950: The University of Alabama School of Nursing was established on the University campus in Tuscaloosa with Dr. Florence A. Hixson as first dean; the nursing school would be moved to Birmingham in 1967.

February 13, 1951: Chi Tau Chapter of Psi Omega dental-social fraternity was established at the Medical Center.

April 2, 1951: The Department of Biochemistry received approval to offer the first doctoral program at the Medical Center.

June 1, 1951: Mrs. T. C. Killingsworth became coordinator and director of the Jefferson-Hillman Hospital Auxiliary, the first person named to the auxiliary’s first paid position.

June 1951: Dr. James J. Durrett became dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

June 1951: Eunice White received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Alabama School of Nursing, becoming the school’s first graduate.

November 22, 1951: The Crippled Children's Clinic and Hospital was officially dedicated adjacent to the Medical Center.

1951: To complete the Medical and Dental Basic Science Building and Dental Clinic, the new basic science building at the Medical Center, Dr. Joseph F. Volker added several hospital beds to qualify for Federal funds under the Hill-Burton Act.

1951: Various Medical Center libraries were consolidated into one Medical Center Library under the direction of Chief Librarian Mildred R. Crowe.

February 2, 1952: Anna Jane Reid became the first woman to receive a graduate degree (in biochemistry) awarded through the Medical Center.

May 31, 1952: The School of Dentistry graduated its first class. Walter C. Andrews, Jr., was the first of the fifty graduates.

September 13, 1952: The Medical Center Library reopened in its new space in the South Wing of the first and second floors of the New Hillman Building.

1952: The Dentala, a student yearbook for the University of Alabama School of Dentistry, was first published.

1952: Dr. Lawrence Reynolds, an Alabama native practicing radiology in Michigan, agreed to donate his personal library and collection of rare medical texts and manuscripts to the Medical Center.

March 22, 1953: The Veterans Administration Hospital was dedicated in the Medical Center.

June 8, 1953: Students from the University of Alabama School of Nursing in Tuscaloosa first came to the Medical Center for clinical training in the hospital complex.

September 1953: Succeeding Interim President Lee Bidgood, Dr. Oliver C. Carmichael became president of The University of Alabama and served until 1957.

1953: Milton Odean Otwell graduated from the University Hospital School of Nursing, becoming the first male graduate of the hospital's nursing program.

May 30, 1954: Claudia Holcombe Heard became the first female graduate of the School of Dentistry.

June 6, 1954: The new University of Alabama Extension Center building was completed adjacent to the Medical Center.

August 1954: The Report of the Special Survey Committee, called the "Duckett Jones Report" for its chief author, was released.

December 1954: The former Birmingham Little Theater building on South 26th Street was donated to The University of Alabama by the family of General Louis V. Clark. The building became home to Town and Gown Theater.

1954: Research grants at the Medical Center totaled $240,000.

1954: The Hill-Burton Act was expanded to include nursing homes, treatment centers, rehabilitation facilities, and chronic disease facilities.

1954: Matthew F. McNulty, Jr., was appointed administrator of Jefferson-Hillman Hospital.

May 28, 1955: Jefferson-Hillman Hospital was renamed University Hospital and Hillman Clinic.

May 29, 1955: Ruth Stillman Hare received the first doctoral degree (in pharmacology) conferred through the Medical Center.

1955: Dr. Robert C. Berson was appointed first vice president for Health Affairs and dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

1955: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was appointed director of Research and Graduate Studies and continued as dean of the dental school.

1955: "Candles in the Canebrake" was the first Town and Gown production held in its new home on South 26th Street.

1955: Sarah Cole Brown became third librarian of the Medical Center Library.

1955: Research and training grants at the Medical Center totaled $312,000.

1955: University Hospital and Hillman Clinic operating costs reached almost $3,500,000.

1955: A Medical Center Advisory Board was established.

January 31, 1956: Louis V. Clark Memorial Theatre was officially dedicated as home to Town and Gown Theatre.

May 8, 1956: An untitled student newspaper was published at the Birmingham Extension Center, it was later named the Center Scope.

May 27, 1956: Howard C. Elliott, Jr., became the first man to receive a doctoral degree (in biochemistry) conferred through the Medical Center.

June 10, 1956: University of Alabama Extension Center building was rededicated as Tidwell Hall.

1956: Research grants at the Medical Center totaled $459,000.

1956: The Women's Club of the University of Alabama School of Dentistry was organized with Mrs. E. E. Evans as first president.

January 1957: The Medical Center Bulletin was first published as the University of Alabama Medical Center News Bulletin.

February 1957: University Hospital's Beacon was first published.

February 17, 1957: President Dwight D. Eisenhower appointed Dr. Champ Lyons to the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine.

April 4, 1957: Groundbreaking ceremonies were held for the Lawrence Reynolds Library.

May 17, 1957: The Medical Center's chapter of Sigma Xi was installed in ceremonies held in the University Hospital Auditorium. Dr. Arthur J. Tomisek was elected first president.

May 1957: Bertha Smith selected as the first “Miss University Center” during the second annual spring dance sponsored by the Student Government Association of the Birmingham Extension Center.

July 12, 1957: University Hospital School of Nursing received full accreditation from the National Nursing Accreditation Service.

September 1, 1957: Dr. Walter B. Frommeyer, Jr., became physician-in-chief and chair of the Department of Medicine.

November 4, 1957: The statue of Dr. W. E. B. Davis was relocated to the Medical Center from Woodrow Wilson Park in downtown Birmingham.

December 17, 1957: Amendment No. 4 was passed by state voters, making possible federal matching money for the purchase of ten and one-half blocks of urban renewal lands.

1957: For the fall term, total enrollment at the Birmingham Extension Center was 1,856 students.

January 1, 1958: Succeeding Interim President James H. Newman, Dr. Frank A. Rose became the 20th president of The University of Alabama. He served until 1969.

February 2, 1958: The Lawrence Reynolds Library was dedicated.

June 9, 1958: The deed to the ten and one-half block expansion area was transferred to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

October 15, 1958: Dr. Richard T. Eastwood became executive director of University Affairs in Birmingham, reporting directly to President Frank A. Rose.

November 25, 1958: The first Tinsley Randolph Harrison Lecture, "Medical Investigators from Harvey to Harrison," was delivered by Dr. William Dock of the State University of New York.

November 26, 1958: University Hospital School of Nursing held an open house in its new quarters on South 18th Street in the renovated Dr. Gus' Drive-In Restaurant.

1958: Dr. George W. Campbell was named director of the Birmingham Extension Center.

1958: The Faculty Wives Club of the Medical College of Alabama was organized with Mrs. Robert Berson as first president.

August 1, 1959: Groundbreaking was held for a psychiatric clinic made possible by a gift from Joseph S. and Bertha Pizitz Smolian.

September 1959: Groundbreaking for Fort Mortimer H. Jordan Alabama National Guard 109th Evacuation Hospital Armory was held.

October 18, 1959: Luther Leonidas Hill Heart Center was dedicated.

November 1959: Groundbreaking ceremonies for Children's Hospital were held.

1959: Research grants, training grants, and fellowships at the Medical Center exceeded $1,000,000.

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1960: The world's first clinical use of a commercially made fiberoptic endoscope for observing the inside on an organ or cavity was used at University Hospital. The endoscope was developed by Dr. Basil I. Hirschowitz.

February 1960: Frank E. and Margaret Cameron Spain gave $500,000 for the construction of new rehabilitation center.

May 1960: Progress Notes, the student yearbook for the Medical College of Alabama, was first published at the cost of $7.50 per copy. Fourth year student Myron A. Levine was editor of the yearbook.

July 1, 1960: Dr. Joseph F. Volker began a one-year leave-of-absence to direct the Arizona Medical School Study. Dr. Arthur H. Wuehrmann served as acting dean of the dental school during Volker's absence.

September 1960: Three medical-social fraternities, Phi Beta Pi (Sigma chapter), Nu Sigma Nu (Beta Phi chapter), and Phi Chi (Iota chapter), formed the first inter-fraternity council at the Medical Center.

October 2, 1960: Fort Mortimer H. Jordan Alabama National Guard 109th Evacuation Hospital Armory was dedicated in the Medical Center.

October 9, 1960: The Psychiatric Clinic was dedicated.

December 9, 1960: The Health Sciences Research Building was dedicated.

April 30, 1961: Children's Hospital was dedicated adjacent to the Medical Center.

October 1961: The Psychiatric Clinic was named in honor of Medical Center benefactors Joseph S. and Bertha Pizitz Smolian.

1961: The Roberts & Son Building was purchased for use as the outpatient clinic of University Hospital.

July 1962: The Medical Center Apartments opened.

July 1962: Spain Rehabilitation groundbreaking ceremony was held.

July 1962: Eye Foundation Hospital groundbreaking ceremony was held.

August 9, 1962: Groundbreaking was held for the Engineering Building.

September 1, 1962: Dr. Joseph F. Volker became second vice president for Health Affairs.

September 1, 1962: Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr., became dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

September 1, 1962: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., became second dean of the School of Dentistry.

1962: Dr. W. Paul Brann was named assistant to the vice president for Health Affairs.

1962: The University Hospital School of Nursing Residence opened.

1962: University Computer Center organized with Homer C. Jemison as director.

1962: The General Clinical Research Center was established at the Medical Center with a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Clifton K. Meador was named as the center's first director.

1962: Drs. Wayne H. and Sara C. Finley received a grant from the NIH to establish a cytogenetics laboratory at the Medical Center.

January 9, 1963: Birmingham chapter of the American Association of University Professors was organized in a meeting at the Medical Center. Dr. Leland C. Clark was elected first president.

June 11, 1963: Vivian J. Malone and James A. Hood became the first African American students of The University of Alabama. Although Malone and Hood enrolled at the main campus in Tuscaloosa, they were the first African American students admitted to the University, its medical center in Birmingham, or its extension division programs throughout the state.

September 15, 1963: Victims of the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Church were brought to the Hillman Emergency Clinic at University Hospital. Fifteen people received treatment at the hospital and autopsies were done on the bodies of the four young victims of the bombing.

September 1963: Luther Lawler became the first African American to register for classes at the Birmingham Extension Center when he enrolled in the master’s program in education.

September 1963: The Medical College Faculty Council approved a request that all facilities in the Medical and Dental Basic Science Building be available to all students and employees without regard to race.

October 2, 1963: Joseph S. and Bertha Pizitz Smolian gave their home to the Medical Center for use as a cultural center.

October 9, 1963: In a letter to Vice President Joseph F. Volker, African American employees in the university’s Medical and Dental Basic Science Building formally requested desegregation of the building’s cafeteria and facilities.

October 1963: Computer Research Laboratory opened in the former Life of Georgia Insurance Building.

December 31, 1963: The independent Eye Foundation Hospital was opened following dedication ceremonies on December 8, 1963.

1963: Extramural grants and contracts at the Medical Center totaled $3,888,514.

1963: Engineering students were first able to complete all four years of classes at the Birmingham Extension Center.

1963: University Hospital and Hillman Clinic was renamed The University of Alabama Hospitals and Clinics.

1963: The medical school's Division of Continuing Medical Education first offered continuing education courses to Alabama physicians.

February 1, 1964: The separate Hillman Emergency and University Emergency Clinics were merged to form one combined University Hospital Emergency Clinic.

March 3, 1964: Dr. Tinsley R. Harrison delivered the first Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Witches and Doctors."

April 3, 1964: The Dental Education and Research Building was dedicated.

April 25-26, 1964: The Spain Rehabilitation Center was dedicated. Dr. William C. Fleming was the center's first director.

May 27, 1964: The first Medical Student Research Day was held preceding the Honors Convocation of the Medical College of Alabama. Thomas C. Smitherman won first prize for his paper “Distribution of Sucrose-C14 in Thyroid Tissue.” Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr., was his faculty sponsor.

June 1964: University Hospital Outpatient Services Building opened in the renovated Roberts & Son Building.

July 2, 1964: President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibited segregation in any facilities receiving federal funds from the Hill-Burton Act.

September 8, 1964: The entering class of eight students in the medical technology program at University Hospital included one African American, Wilma Ann Barnes. She was the first African American enrolled in any programs in the Medical Center.

October 24, 1964: Drs. Tinsley R. Harrison and Champ Lyons were named Distinguished Professors by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees, the first such designations given to a member of the Alabama faculty.

October 1964: At the start of the academic year, 44 African American students were enrolled at the Birmingham Extension Center.

1964: First classes were held in the new engineering building adjacent to the Birmingham Extension Center.

1964: Dr. James T. Montgomery became the first African American physician to be granted staff privileges at University Hospital and the first African American to receive a faculty appointment in the medical school.

1964: Joseph S. and Bertha Pizitz Smolian donated the Cole House to the Medical Center for use as Friendship House.

1964: The Alabama Journal of Medical Sciences began publication with Dr. Emmett B. Carmichael as editor.

1964: A gift from Fay Fletcher Kerner made possible the first endowed chair at the Medical Center, the Fay Fletcher Kerner Chair of Surgery.

1964: The Medical Rehabilitation Research and Training Center was established with Dr. William C. Fleming as director.

January 3, 1965: Effective on this date, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibited segregation in any healthcare facility receiving Federal funds

April 25, 1965: The process of desegregating University Hospital was reported as 100 percent complete.

April 27, 1965: Dr. Champ Lyons delivered the second Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Some Surgical Aspects of the Stroke Problem."

May 30, 1965: Vivian J. Malone received a B. S. degree in Commerce and Business Administration, becoming the first African American graduate of The University of Alabama system.

May 1965: The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare toured University Hospital and found it in compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

July 1965: The former University Hospital School of Nursing Residence was rededicated as the Roy R. Kracke Clinical Services Building.

July 30, 1965: VA Hospital Research Annex Wing groundbreaking was held.

August 1965: University of Alabama Medical Center Foundation was created as a non-profit corporation.

September 7, 1965: Barbara Walker became the first African American student in the University Hospital School of Nursing, the hospital-based diploma program.

September 1965: Sarah Louise Fisher became the first African American student in The University of Alabama School of Nursing, then located on the campus in Tuscaloosa.

1965: Extramural grants and awards at the Medical Center totaled $4,445,900.

1965: Dr. Joseph F. Volker assigned responsibility for research and grants administration to Dr. John B. Dunbar and for graduate studies to Dr. Samuel B. Barker.

1965: Dr. Clifton O. Dummett was given an adjunct position in the School of Dentistry, becoming the first African American member of the school's faculty.

February 1966: Dr. Joseph F. Volker, Arthur Garikes, E. Todd Wheeler, and Dr. George W. Campbell produced the Expansion and Land Utilization Study-UAB.

April 27, 1966: Dr. Joseph F. Volker delivered the third Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Way of an Administrator."

July 1966: Dr. John W. Kirklin was appointed chair of the Department of Surgery and surgeon-in-chief of University Hospital.

August 21, 1966: North Wing of University Hospital was dedicated.

September 15, 1966: The University of Alabama Extension Center programs were elevated to the four-year College of General Studies, but remained a branch of The University of Alabama. Dr. George W. Campbell was named first dean.

November 1966: President Frank A. Rose designated all university operations in Birmingham as the "University of Alabama in Birmingham," a degree-granting branch of The University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa.

November 1966: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was named vice president for Birmingham Affairs.

November 9, 1966: The Health Sciences Research Building was rededicated as the Lyons-Harrison Research Building.

November 13, 1966: Dr. Frank A. Rose announced plans to move The University of Alabama School of Nursing from Tuscaloosa to the UAB Medical Center.

December 1966: Senator Lister Hill announced original grant funding for the Alabama Regional Medical Program.

1966: The University Hospital School of Nursing, a diploma program, admitted its last class. The class graduated in 1969 and the school was eliminated.

1966: The Alabama legislature commissioned the firm of Booz, Allen, and Hamilton to study the expansion of medical education in Alabama.

1966: Robert W. Holters was named interim administrator and later administrator of University Hospital.

1966: The Division of Allied Health Sciences, comprised of University Hospital's paramedical training programs, was established in the College of General Studies.

1966: Laboratory of Medical Genetics was established under the direction of Drs. Wayne H. and Sara C. Finley.

1966: School of Health Services Administration was established with Matthew F. McNulty, Jr., as dean.

1966: Richard Charles Dale and Samuel William Sullivan, Jr., became the first African American students of the Medical College of Alabama.

1966: Center for Hospital Continuing Education was established. It was later renamed the Center for Health Services Continuing Education. Dr. Richard G. Allen served as the first director of the center.

1966: The Medical Center had a budget of $32,000,000 and a payroll of over $15,000,000 for its 3,200 employees.

1966: Cardiovascular Research and Training Center established with grant from the National Heart Institute. Dr. T. Joseph Reeves served as the center's first director.

March 18, 1967: Dr. Thomas E. Hunt delivered the fourth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Tricky Business of Teaching."

May 1967: The Appalachian Regional Commission awarded UAB a grant to establish a Regional Technical Institute for Health Occupations.

July 1967: A groundbreaking was held for the Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders.

August 1967: The University of Alabama School of Nursing was moved from the Tuscaloosa campus to the Medical Center in Birmingham. Dr. Florence A. Hixson, founding dean, remained in that position following the move.

September 1967: UAB Advisory Board was established.

September 22, 1967: The Veterans Administration Research Wing was dedicated.

October 26, 1967: The student newspaper, Kaleidoscope, was first published. J. Pat Cather was the first editor.

1967: The Myocardial Infarction Research Unit, later renamed the Specialized Center for Research in Ischemic Heart Disease, was established. Dr. Harold T. Dodge was the first director.

1967: The Alabama legislature granted its first direct appropriation ($1.1 million) to the College of General Studies.

1967: A Faculty Women's Club of UAB was organized as a campus-wide organization that combined other such campus clubs (medical, dental, etc.). Mrs. K. Lemone Yeilding elected as the club's first president.

March 6, 1968: Rust Research Center groundbreaking was held.

March 29, 1968: Dr. Samuel B. Barker delivered the fifth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Perspectives."

May 8, 1968: Dr. Arnold G. Diethelm successfully performed the Medical Center's first kidney transplant.

June 1968: Barbara Walker Mitchell became the first African American graduate of the University Hospital School of Nursing.

June 1968: The Medical Center and the VA Hospital were authorized to share programs and facilities under Public Law 89-785.

July 30, 1968: Symbolic groundbreaking was held for Medical Center Library, School of Nursing, and Basic Health Sciences buildings.

July 1968: Dr. Herschell Lee Hamilton received a clinical appointment in the Department of Surgery and became the first African American board-certified general surgeon at University Hospital.

October 1968: Enrollment in the College of General Studies totaled 3,378 students, including business administration (591), allied health sciences (104), education (574), engineering (408), humanities (215), natural sciences & mathematics (341), and social sciences (316).

November 1, 1968: Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr., became vice president for Health Affairs.

November 1968: Dr. Clifton K. Meador became dean of the Medical College of Alabama.

1968: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced final approval of a 45-block expansion program for UAB and grants totaling over $11.4 million for the project.

1968: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was named executive vice president of UAB.

1968: The entering class size of the Medical College of Alabama was increased to 85.

1968: Dr. W. Paul Brann was named first vice president for Fiscal Affairs.

1968: The Regional Maxillofacial Prosthetics Treatment and Training Center was established with Dr. Dwight J. Castleberry as first director.

1968: Alabama Transplant Center was created in the Medical Center and served as the clinical center for all transplant activities at UAB.

January 28, 1969: Dr. Frank A. Rose announced his resignation as president of The University of Alabama.

February 1969: Sarah Louise Fisher became the first African American graduate of the School of Nursing.

March 27, 1969: Dr. Howard L. Holley delivered the sixth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "...And Gladly Teach."

March 1969: Delois Skipwith became the first African American faculty member in the School of Nursing and the first tenure-track African American faculty member at UAB.

March 1969: The Center for Urban Affairs was established with Dr. John B. Dunbar as the first director.

April 1, 1969: Dr. Keith D. Blayney became director of the School of Health Services Administration.

April 21, 1969: The Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders was dedicated.

May 18, 1969: The Occupational Rehabilitation Center was dedicated at 1616 6th Avenue South.

June 5, 1969: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved a plan “to provide for a system in which a separate President will be elected for each of the three campuses of the University with each President reporting to the Board of Trustees.” The new three-campus system, a plan which was to be effective September 5, 1969, was announced publicly eleven days later.

June 16, 1969: Governor Albert P. Brewer announced the establishment of The University of Alabama System comprised of autonomous campuses in Tuscaloosa (UA), Birmingham (UAB), and Huntsville (UAH). The University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB) became one of the three universities in the new three-campus system.

June 16, 1969: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was named first president of UAB.

June 25, 1969: Governor Albert P. Brewer announced $5 million in bond funds for College of General Studies construction.

August 29, 1969: Governor Albert P. Brewer signed an act appropriating $50,000 for the development of a School of Community and Allied Health Resources at UAB.

August 1969: Dr. Henry B. Peters was named the first dean of the School of Optometry, the first optometry school in the nation to be integrated into an academic medical center.

August 1969: MIST (Medical Information Service via Telephone) was created at the UAB Medical Center.

August 1969: Medical Center Annex, formerly the Cullom Apartments, was demolished to build the Kahler Plaza Hotel.

September 1, 1969: Dr. Henry B. Peters arrived on campus as the first dean of the new School of Optometry.

September 5, 1969: Dr. Joseph F. Volker assumed the office as the first president of the newly autonomous University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB).

September 12, 1969: Alabama Act 1054, the Skidmore Bill, officially changed the name of the Medical College of Alabama to The University of Alabama School of Medicine.

September 27, 1969: The first eight students began classes in the new School of Optometry.

September 1969: Intramural athletic teams were organized by Dr. James Sharman.

October 15, 1969: A student demonstration in support of the Vietnam Moratorium was held in front of the College of General Studies Building.

1969: Rev. Abraham L. Woods, Jr., a pioneer in the Civil Rights movement, became an adjunct (part-time) instructor in the UAB history department.

1969: Regional Technical Institute for Health Occupations was established.

1969: Dr. Keith D. Blayney was named administrator of University Hospital.

1969: Ellen Gregg Ingalls Award was established for excellence in classroom teaching. Dr. Hubert H. Harper, associate professor of English, was the first Ingalls recipient.

1969: Dr. T. Joseph Reeves was named chair of the Department of Medicine.

1969: University Hospital General Services Building opened at 1809 5th Avenue South.

1969: UAB’s first yearbook, the Annual Report, was published with Kay Haslam serving as editor. The Annual Report was focused more toward the College of General Studies since the dental, medical and nursing schools already had yearbooks.

1969: The Woodward House atop Red Mountain was acquired by the university as the official residence for the UAB president.

1969: Rust Research Center, which housed the university's computer center, opened.

1969: Active extramural grants and contracts for the newly independent UAB totaled $18,190,620.

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January 30, 1970: Groundbreaking was held for University College Building No. 1, the Education Building.

February 11, 1970: The first meeting was held for the newly elected senate of the College of General Studies. The 39-member College Senate included elected faculty, staff, and students as well as administrators appointed by the dean.

February 19, 1970: Golf, the first NCAA intercollegiate sports team at UAB, opened its initial season in a match with Tulane University.

February 1970: Richard W. Jackson appointed first director of security at UAB.

March 26, 1970: Dr. Sidney B. Finn delivered the seventh Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "In Pursuit of the Elusive."

April 16-17, 1970: Officials with the US Dept of Health, Education and Welfare toured UAB to review the university’s compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. While HEW made a few suggestions for administrative improvements, the university was noted for its progress.

April 1970: South Wing of University Hospital opened.

May 1, 1970: Dr. Samuel B. Barker became first dean of the newly established UAB Graduate School.

May 16, 1970: The first social sorority, Alpha Sigma Tau, was formally established at UAB.

May 17, 1970: The Ellen Gregg Ingalls Eye Research Institute was dedicated adjoining the Eye Foundation Hospital.

May 1970: Several hundred students and faculty members held a protest in front of the College of General Studies Building in sympathy for Kent State.

June 7, 1970: In ceremonies held at the Birmingham Municipal Auditorium, UAB awarded its first degrees as an autonomous university. Dr. Joseph F. Volker, UAB president, received the University's first honorary degree. Ronald T. Acton received a Ph.D. in Microbiology, becoming the first person to receive a degree from the University. Ellen Clyde Cook received a degree in Microbiology, the first master's degree awarded by the University, and George Adams, Jr., received a degree in Anthropology-Sociology, the first bachelor's degree awarded by the University.

June 7, 1970: Richard Charles Dale and Samuel William Sullivan, Jr., became the first African American graduates of the School of Medicine.

June 14, 1970: The Psychiatric Day Treatment Center was dedicated.

June 14, 1970: Comprehensive Community Mental Health Center established in the Department of Psychiatry.

June 30, 1970: Dr. Florence A. Hixson retired as first dean of the School of Nursing.

July 1, 1970: Dr. Marie L. O'Koren became the second dean of the School of Nursing.

July 1, 1970: Ground was broken for the Diabetes Research and Education Hospital.

July 1, 1970: Dr. Paul H. Spence became librarian of the College of General Studies.

July 1970: Dr. John B. Dunbar became the first vice president for Student and Community Affairs.

July 1970: Groundbreaking was held for University College Building No. 2, the Physical Sciences Building.

August 29, 1970: UAB’s second commencement ceremony was held in the Exhibition Hall at the Birmingham Municipal Auditorium for 173 graduates, including 59 who received advanced degrees.

September 1970: Richard Rudolph, Jimmie Walker, Jr., and Wilson Wright, Jr., became the first African American students in the School of Dentistry.

December 1970: The first Ph.D. program, biology, was approved for the College of General Studies.

1970: UAB received acceptance as a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) school.

1970: Dr. J. Durwood Bradley was named full-time chief-of-staff at University Hospital.

1970: The UAB Burn Center was established with Dr. Alan R. Dimick as director.

1970: Total student enrollment for the fall term in all schools for the second year of classes of the new UAB was 6,629, with 2,724 females.

1970: Dr. John R. Durant established the Cancer Research and Training Center, later designated as the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center.

1970: The Regional Technical Institute for Health Occupations opened.

January 15, 1971: Dr. Keith D. Blayney became dean of the School of Community and Allied Health Resources.

January 15, 1971: James E. Moon became administrator of University Hospital.

March 8, 1971: Dr. Walter B. Frommeyer delivered the eighth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "A Physician's Prayer."

March 11, 1971: The Center for Developmental and Learning Disorders was named in honor of former Alabama governor Chauncey Sparks.

April 14, 1971: A National Honor Society chapter was first organized at the College of General Studies.

May 16, 1971: Eastern Annex of Ullman High School was rededicated as the Bell Building in honor of George C. Bell, the former principal of the Ullman High School.

May 1971: UAB Chorus gave its first campus concert.

May 1971: A groundbreaking ceremony was held for University College Building No. 3 (the Humanities Building) and for the University College Library (Sterne Library).

June 1971: Six students received their Bachelor of Science degrees in Physiological Optics becoming the first graduates of the School of Optometry.

August 1, 1971: Effective on this date, the College of General Studies was reorganized as University College consisting of four academic schools: Arts and Sciences, Business, Education, and Engineering.

August 4, 1971: Dr. Frederick W. Conner was named interim dean of the new School of Arts and Sciences; the school was abolished two years later.

August 1971: The former Ullman High School was rededicated as UAB's Ullman Building, a facility comprised by the original 1901 school building and the school's 1955 addition.

September 1, 1971: Stevan Grebel became first director of UAB's ballet program; his wife, Melanie Mihalic Grebel, became assistant to the director.

September 18, 1971: Dr. Fain A. Guthrie became first dean of the School of Education after serving as interim dean for one month.

September 1971: Dr. Jerry D. Young became first dean of the School of Business.

October 6, 1971: The Rebel and Sophie Zeigler Medical Research Building was dedicated.

October 19, 1971: The Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences was dedicated and named in honor of Alabama's long-time former Senator.

October 19, 1971: Sarah Cole Brown, who had served as chief librarian since 1955, became first director of the new Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

November 19, 1971: Kemmons Wilson, founder and chairman of the Board of Holiday Inns, presented the first Carri-Don Lecture in the School of Business. The school's first endowed lectureship had been established earlier in the year with a donation from Don and Carrie Marshall of Birmingham.

December 1971: Dr. Joseph Appleton was named first dean of the School of Engineering after having served as interim dean since August.

1971: UAB's central administrative offices opened in the 7-11 Building.

1971: Ballet House opened in renovated Second Presbyterian Church.

1971: UAB was accredited as an independent institution of higher education by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS).

April 17, 1972: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., delivered the ninth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Challenge of Service."

June 4, 1972: Virginia Baxley, long-time registrar of the medical school, became the first female awarded an honorary degree by UAB.

June 1972: UAB Regional Spinal Cord Injury Care System was established with Dr. John M. Miller, III, as director.

August 1972: Dr. George W. Campbell was named first vice president for University College after serving as interim vice president since August of 1971.

September 9, 1972: The Psychiatric Day Treatment Center was renamed in honor of benefactor William P. Engel.

September 24, 1972: Dr. Dalton E. McFarland received appointed as UAB’s first “University Professor,” a position designed to cross all school and departmental lines. His faculty appointment was in the School of Business.

September 1972: University Hospital Outpatient Services Clinic was closed.

October 1972: Mercy Hospital opened.

December 1, 1972: A symbolic groundbreaking was held for the School of Optometry Building.

1972: The Extension Library of Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences opened in the Hillman Hospital building.

1972: Offices for the UAB Graduate School moved into a renovated building at 1016 South 15th Street.

1972: The UAB Center for Labor Education and Research was established. Dr. Higdon C. Roberts, Jr., was the center's founding director.

1972: Air Force ROTC first became available to undergraduate students through a cooperative program with Samford University.

1972: Pi Kappa Alpha was chartered as the first social fraternity at UAB.

1972: UAB Police Department formally organized with Thomas C. Seals as the first chief of police.

1972: Payroll for UAB's 6,000 employees topped $50 million.

March 7-8, 1973: The Diabetes Research and Education Building was dedicated in the Medical Center as the nation's first public, university-affiliated diabetes hospital.

March 27, 1973: Dr. J. Garber Galbraith delivered the tenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Perspectives in Neurosurgery."

May 20, 1973: Dedication ceremonies were held for University College Buildings No. 1, No. 2, and No. 3.

April 1973: The UAB School of Business became the youngest business school in the nation to be accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business.

June 4, 1973: Seven optometry students received the first O.D. degrees during UAB's commencement exercises; Neil M. Bleakley was the School's first doctoral graduate.

June 7, 1973: The three divisions comprising the School of Arts and Sciences were elevated to the Schools of Humanities, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences.

June 7, 1973: Dr. Frederick W. Conner named first dean of the School of Humanities.

June 7, 1973: Dr. Roger W. Hanson named first dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

June 7, 1973: Dr. George E. Passey named first dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

July 1, 1973: Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr., became dean of the School of Medicine.

July 8, 1973: First patients were admitted to the Diabetes Research and Education Hospital.

September 1, 1973: Dr. Charles G. Jamerson was appointed to the faculty of the School of Business as an assistant professor in the Center for Labor Education and Research, becoming the first African American faculty member of the business school.

October 1973: The Division of Special Studies was established to coordinate non-credit courses, workshops, seminars, and conferences. Dr. Rudolph Davidson was named director.

October 1973: University College Library was dedicated.

October 1973: Groundbreaking was held for the Physical Education Facility.

December 7-9, 1973: The Diabetes Hospital was formally dedicated at UAB in two-day festivities at the medical center. The hospital, which occupied one floor of the Diabetes Research and Education Building, had opened for patients on the eighth of July.

1973: University Bookstore opened in former Utopia Cleaners building at 806 South 15th Street.

1973: University of Alabama Hospitals and Clinics was renamed The University of Alabama Hospitals.

1973: The Diabetes Research and Training Center was established with Dr. William J. Reddy as first director. This research center was located within the School of Medicine.

1973: UAB became Birmingham's second largest employer.

1973: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved a resolution naming the University College Library after Birmingham businessman and philanthropist Mervyn H. Sterne.

1973: The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation was established and incorporated as a not-for-profit, professional corporation.

1973: Dr. David M. Witten became the first president of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

March 1974: Dr. Jerry D. Young became first vice president for Finance.

March 1974: Dr. John B. Dunbar became first vice president for Administration.

April 15, 1974: Dr. Elizabeth C. Crosby delivered the eleventh Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Our Curious Cortex."

April 1974: A symbolic groundbreaking was held for the Lurleen B. Wallace Cancer Hospital.

June 9, 1974: Catherine Steinmitz Amos received her O.D. degree becoming the School of Optometry's first female graduate.

June 9, 1974: Jimmie Walker, Jr., and Wilson Wright, Jr., became the first African American graduates of the School of Dentistry.

August 1, 1974: Groundbreaking was held for the Monday Morning Quarterback Tower.

September 24, 1974: Edward M. Holmes, Jr., Pavilion of the Spain Rehabilitation Center was dedicated.

November 1974: Physical Education Facility opened.

December 15, 1974: Patience Hodges Claybon became the first African American female graduate of the School of Medicine.

1974: The Veterans Administration Regional Medical Education Center established as one of only three such centers in the nation. Clyde G. Cox was the center's first director.

1974: University of Alabama Medical Center Foundation, a non-profit corporation, was renamed the UAB Medical and Educational Foundation.

1974: Dr. M. Gene Newport became second dean of the School of Business.

February 19, 1975: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved plans for UAB to establish a non-commercial, educational FM radio station for the campus.

April 20, 1975: Mercy Hospital was renamed Cooper Green Hospital.

June 4, 1975: Groundbreaking was held for the Roberts Annex at Clark Memorial Theatre.

July 1975: UAB Residence Hall at 1600 9th Avenue South was named in honor of Hugh Denman, long-time director of the Birmingham Housing Authority.

August 1975: School of Nursing received approval for the first nursing doctoral program in the Southeast.

September 12, 1975: The School of Optometry Building was dedicated.

September 17, 1975: Dr. John W. Kirklin delivered the twelfth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Training of Horses, Quarterbacks, Pilots, and Surgeons."

October 24, 1975: The Reynolds Historical Library was rededicated within the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

November 22, 1975: The UAB Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa national leadership honor society was chartered. Ninety-one members from across the UAB campus were initiated into ODK; Dr. Aaron L. Lamar, Jr., became the first faculty advisor.

November 1975: The University Ambulatory Center was demolished in order to build East Base of University Hospital.

November 1975: Medical Towers Building was acquired.

1975: The Alabama legislature appropriated funds for the purchase of approximately 45 blocks for UAB expansion.

1975: The entering class size of the School of Medicine was increased to 145.

1975:Aura, UAB’s student literary arts review, debuted with an issue published during the fall.

1975: UAB acquired the Medical Center Plaza Building and renamed it University College Building No. 4.

1975: Dr. John W. Kirklin became the second president of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

January 17, 1976: Medical and Dental Basic Science Building and Dental Clinic was rededicated as the School of Dentistry Building.

March 15, 1976: Dr. Thomas K. Hearn, Jr., became second dean of the School of Humanities.

March 1976: Dr. Joseph F. Volker presented Hugh Denman of the Birmingham Housing Authority $8.8 million for the purchase of 45 blocks for UAB expansion.

March 1976: Ground was broken for University College Building No. 5.

April 1, 1976: Dr. William F. Bridgers was named to develop public health efforts at UAB.

June 1, 1976: The Ambulatory Dialysis Center opened at 516 South 20th Street.

July 1976: Dr. W. Paul Brann became second vice president for Administration.

September 21, 1976: Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr., delivered the thirteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Endocrinology Revisited."

September 24, 1976: The UAB Report, the weekly faculty and staff newspaper, was first published.

December 4, 1976: School of Community and Allied Health Resources was renamed the School of Public and Allied Health, Dr. Keith D. Blayney renamed as dean.

December 5, 1976: WBHM-FM Radio broadcast for the first time as the 200th affiliated station of National Public Radio. Dr. Florence M. Monroe was the station's first general manager.

1976: Dr. Joseph F. Volker was named the first chancellor of three-campus University of Alabama System.

1976: The Center for Aging was established.

1976: The entering class size of the School of Medicine was increased to 165.

January 14, 1977: The Radiation Therapy and Tumor Institute was dedicated as Phase I of the Lurleen B. Wallace Memorial Hospital and Tumor Institute.

February 1, 1977: Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr., became the second president of UAB.

February 26, 1977: Dr. Edwin G. Waldrop, a member of the Class of 1946, was awarded the first Distinguished Alumnus Award by the University of Alabama School of Medicine Alumni Association.

May 13, 1977: The Alabama Supreme Court held a session on the UAB campus for the first time. Three cases were heard by Chief Justice C. C. Torbert, Jr., and the other eight members of Alabama’s highest court.

May 26, 1977: R. Lee Walthall became first vice president for Institutional Advancement and Legal Affairs.

May 27, 1977: The UAB Mini Park was dedicated.

May 1977: Dr. J. Dudley Pewitt became third vice president for Administration.

June 5, 1977: Joyce S. Madison became the first African American female to graduate from the School of Dentistry.

June 14, 1977: Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr., announced that UCLA Coach Gene Bartow would become UAB's new Athletic Director and head coach of the Men's Basketball team.

July 18, 1977: The Monday Morning Quarterback Tower was dedicated as Phase I of the Alabama Heart Hospital.

August 1977: Fran Sharp Merrell became the first head coach of the new Women's Basketball team.

September 1, 1977: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., became vice president for Health Affairs.

September 26, 1977: Dr. Thomas N. James delivered the fourteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Dobermans, Dalmatians, and Deaf Children."

October 10, 1977: Engineering Building was renamed Cudworth Hall in honor of James R. Cudworth.

October 1977: Basic Health Sciences Building was renamed Volker Hall in honor of UAB's first president.

November 9, 1977: UAB Blazers joined the Sun Belt Conference.

1977: Sports Medicine Institute established as an official UAB center. Dr. Kurt M. W. Niemann was the first director.

1977: Drs. Leo M. Hall and James E. Myrick obtained the first license from UAB for manufacture and sale of an invention produced at the university. The reagent they developed was licensed to Calbiochem for US and international sales.

1977: Dr. Robert Glaze became first vice president for Research and Graduate Studies.

1977: The Multipurpose Arthritis Center, later renamed the Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases Center, was created.

1977: Urological Rehabilitation and Research Center established at UAB with Dr. L. Keith Lloyd as director.

1977: World's first effective treatment for a viral disease, the deadly herpes simplex encephalitis, occurred at University Hospital.

January 1, 1978: Dr. Leonard H. Robinson became third dean of the School of Dentistry.

January 13, 1978: In a campus-wide election, students, faculty, and staff voted to name all intercollegiate athletic teams the UAB Blazers.

January 1978: Gladys McQueen, supervisor of keypunch services in the Central Computing Facility, was named UAB’s first “Employee of the Month.” At the time, McQueen had 24 years of service.

February 1, 1978: The Russell Ambulatory Center was dedicated.

March 6, 1978: University College Building No. 5 opened.

April 28, 1978: University College Building No. 5 was renamed in honor of Dr. George W. Campbell, vice president for University College.

May 1978: Dr. John D. Jones became first vice president for Student Affairs.

June 4, 1978: Terrence Nelson Ingraham received his O.D. degree becoming the first African American graduate of the School of Optometry.

July 24, 1978: Upon the retirement of Sarah Cole Brown, Richard B. Fredericksen became second director of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

September 15, 1978: Dr. James H. Woodward, Jr., became second dean of the School of Engineering.

September 22, 1978: Dr. Marie L. O'Koren delivered the fifteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Nursing: Past Realities and Future Imperatives."

October 1, 1978: Dr. Thomas K. Hearn became second vice president for University College.

October 27, 1978: The Center for Advanced Medical Studies (CAMS) was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees as an official UAB Center. Later, the center was renamed in honor of Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr.

November 24, 1978: Before a crowd of over 14,800 at the Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center, the UAB men's basketball team competed in its first game, losing to Nebraska by a score of 55 to 64.

November 29, 1978: The Women's Basketball team played its first game at the Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center, losing to North Alabama by a score of 77 to 82.

November 29, 1978: The School of Public and Allied Health was renamed the School of Community and Allied Health, Dr. Keith D. Blayney remained as dean.

December 1, 1978: Drs. Kenneth J. Roozen and Blaine A. Brownell became associate deans and co-directors of the UAB Graduate School.

1978: UAB Ambassadors corps formed to provide student hosts at official university functions.

1978: Alabama native Harry "the Hat" Walker was named first head coach of the new Men's Baseball team. Games for the UAB Blazers were played at Birmingham's historic Rickwood Field.

1978: Blazer cheerleading squad of 10 formed in the spring with John Slivka and Susan Rheuby as Head Cheerleaders. Deborath Sutherland was the first director of the cheer and dance teams.

1978: The Medical Education Building opened.

1978: Susan Cook became the first head coach of the new Women's Volleyball team.

1978: The Nephrology Research and Training Center was established at UAB with Dr. Robert G. Luke as first director.

1978: Dr. Aaron L. Lamar, Jr., was named assistant vice president and dean of Student Affairs, becoming the first African American appointed to a senior administrative position at UAB.

1978: A pink dragon served as the first official mascot for the UAB Blazers.

1978: UAB Pain Treatment Center was formally established as an official center although the program had originated in the late 1960s. Dr. H. Ronald Vinik was the center's first director.

1978: Peter N. Derzis, Jr., became UAB's first Sports Information director.

1978: Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences contained 188,000 volumes and 2,877 journal subscriptions.

1978: The Alabama Regional Organ and Tissue Center established.

January 23, 1979: In a reception held in the Rust Research Center, Gladys McQueen was honored as UAB’s first “Employee of the Year.” She had been selected as the university’s first “Employee of the Month” the previous January.

January 25-27, 1979: During basketball season, UAB celebrated its first Homecoming festivities.

January 27, 1979: UAB gained full membership as an NCAA Division I athletics program.

January 1979: The University of Alabama System Medical Education Program (UASMEP) was reaccredited by the national Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME).

April 1979: The Division of Special Studies renamed UAB Special Studies.

June 17, 1979: The Spain Heart Bed Tower, Margaret Cameron Spain Auditorium, Wallace Cancer Bed Tower, and East Base were dedicated as part of the "New U" celebrations.

June 1979: The original Jefferson Hospital building was renamed Jefferson Tower.

July 1979: The former Lawrence Reynolds Library building was demolished in order to construct the Center for Advanced Medical Studies.

September 12, 1979: Vision Science Research Center was dedicated as the only NEI funded center located in an optometry school. Dr. Terry L. Hickey was the center's first director. In 1996 the center received designation as a university-wide research center.

October 12, 1979: UAB’s new heliport was dedicated on the western edge of campus.

October 19, 1979: Dr. J. Claude Bennett delivered the sixteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Bench and the Bedside."

October 26, 1979: The John J. Sparkman Center for International Public Health Education was approved as an official center by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. William F. Bridgers was the center's first director. In 2004 the center was renamed as the Sparkman Center for Global Health.

1979: Tim Hamer became the first head coach of the new Men's Soccer team.

1979: Center for Nursing Research was established.

1979: Dr. James Rachels was named third dean of the School of Humanities after serving as interim since 1978.

1979: Jimmy Ballard became the first head coach of the new Men's Golf team.

1979: The Phoenix, a UAB yearbook chiefly focusing on University College, was first published. Steve Nixon, a junior management major, was editor of the first yearbook.

1979: The Muscular Dystrophy and Myasthenia Gravis Center established.

1979: President S. Richardson Hill, Jr., established the UAB President’s Council. Composed by community business and civic leaders, the council was charged with advising the president on matters related to the advancement of the university.

1979: UAB National Alumni Society was chartered.

1979: The Blue Cross/Blue Shield Building on South 20th Street was acquired and reopened as the Community Health Services Building.

1979: Active extramural grants and contracts at UAB totaled $47,471,028.

1979-1980: Beauregard T. Rooster became the official mascot for the UAB Blazers, the university's second official mascot.

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January 11, 1980: John J. Sparkman Center for International Public Health Education was dedicated.

January 1980: A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Hulsey Center for Arts and Humanities.

March 5-7, 1980: The Center for Advanced Medical Studies was dedicated.

March 15, 1980: Dr. Milly Cowles became second dean of the School of Education.

April 9, 1980: The Physical Education Facility was renamed in honor of former Alabama governor George C. Wallace.

April 30, 1980: Twin Towers, a student residence hall, opened.

June 11, 1980: The first meeting of the Tinsley R. Harrison Medical Student Society was held at UAB. Senior medical student J. Patrick Daugherty was the first to present a research paper before the new student organization.

June 15, 1980: Dr. Lee R. Summerlin became interim dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

September 1980: The Army ROTC program was initiated at UAB, one of 41 universities throughout the country to gain an Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. The UAB program began with 12 cadets.

November 7, 1980: Dr. John R. Durant delivered the seventeenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "People I Have Known."

1980: The Pediatric Pulmonary Center was established.

1980: The Center for International Programs was established with Robert W. French as director.

1980: William M. Voigt became the first president of the UAB National Alumni Society.

1980: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees dropped the designation University of Alabama System Medical Education Program (UASMEP) for the system’s medical programs in Birmingham, Huntsville, and Tuscaloosa. In its place, the board recognized that the system had one medical school, The University of Alabama School of Medicine, which is located in Birmingham and which has programs at the Huntsville and Tuscaloosa campuses.

1980: The Occupational Health and Safety Educational Resource Center was created.

1980: The former Jefferson County Public Health Building was demolished.

January 21, 1981: Alabama Congenital Heart Disease Diagnosis and Treatment Center was established with Dr. John W. Kirklin as director.

January 21, 1981: The Cystic Fibrosis Research Center was established at UAB with Dr. Roy Curtiss III as first director. In 1986 the center was renamed in honor of Gregory Fleming James, the late son of Governor Fob James.

January 31, 1981: During UAB's homecoming celebrations, David Bolus and Kay Ellis were chosen as the first “Mr. and Ms. UAB.”

May 17, 1981: Joseph H. Woolf Family Practice Center was dedicated.

May 29, 1981: UAB Department of Public Health was designated the School of Public Health by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. William F. Bridgers became the new school's first dean.

June 1981: Eight Avenue South was renamed University Boulevard.

September 27, 1981: The Baptist Student Center at UAB was dedicated.

October 23, 1981: Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr., delivered the eighteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Progress."

October 30, 1981: Groundbreaking was held for the University Center.

November 24, 1981: Dr. Robert B. Karp headed the University Hospital team that performed the first heart transplant at UAB.

November 1981: UAB Small Business Development Center was established with Fred Myrick as first director.

December 1, 1981: Dr. Robert Glaze became first vice president for Research and Institutional Advancement after having served as acting vice president since 1980.

December 15, 1981: The Ambulatory Dialysis Home Training Center opened.

1981: The entering class size of the School of Medicine was decreased to 150.

1981: Center for Communications Research was established with Dr. John W. Wittig as director.

1981: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees expanded from eight to fifteen members.

1981: The University College Senate was superseded by the new University College Faculty Senate.

February 2, 1982:UAB Synopsis was first published for the medical and dental staff of University Hospital; Dr. Richard McElvein was first editor.

February 28, 1982: Men's Basketball team won their first Sun Belt Conference title.

March 13, 1982: Men's Basketball team reached the round of 16 in the NCAA basketball playoffs.

April 30, 1982: The Hulsey Center for Arts and Humanities officially opened.

May 17, 1982: Wanda Hightower Jordan became the first UAB athlete to have a jersey retired. A member of the 1978-1982 Women's Basketball team, she had scored 2,854 career points and had gained 1,091 career rebounds.

June 3, 1982: A groundbreaking was held for the Susan Mott Webb Nutrition Sciences Building.

November 12, 1982: Dr. Max D. Cooper delivered the nineteenth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Of Mice, Men, and Chickens."

1982: Laboratory for Special Cancer Research opened at 550 South 11th Street.

1982: Dr. Joseph F. Volker retired as first chancellor of The University of Alabama System and returned to UAB as a distinguished professor.

1982: Dr. Thomas A. Bartlett became the second chancellor of The University of Alabama System.

March 26, 1983: Phyllis Pope, a pre-dentistry major from Olympia Field, Illinois, selected as the first Miss UAB. Twenty-two students participated in the university’s first pageant.

May 21, 1983: UAB held its first telephone student registration in a pilot program sponsored by the Office of Registration and Academic Records.

June 1983: The UAB Critical Care Transport Service began.

August 1983: The UAB Conference Center was renamed the Carrie D. and Don V. Marshall Conference Center.

October 13, 1983: Drs. Wayne H. and Sara C. Finley delivered the twentieth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "From the Roots to the Branches."

October 18, 1983: Susan Mott Webb Nutrition Sciences Building was dedicated.

October 1983: Dr. James Rachels became interim vice president for University College, he served until the end of the year.

October 1983: The University Center opened.

1983: UAB ranked 24th out of 396 institutions in the amount of funding received for research from the National Institutes of Health.

1983: Tom Seals became the first head coach of the new Rifle team.

1983: Dr. Peter V. O'Neil was named second dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics after having served as interim since 1982.

1983: Center for the Advancement of Developing Industries was established with Dr. James H. Woodward, Jr., as first director.

1983: School of Optometry became the only school of its kind in the nation to require students to pass the National Board Examinations to qualify for graduation.

1983: Don Young was named director of Financial Affairs and University Treasurer.

1983: Tim Richards became the first head coach of the new Men's Volleyball team.

1983: The Rev. James T. Crutcher, formerly pastor of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, became the first African American named as a full-time chaplain at University Hospital. He served in that capacity until 1996.

1983: UAB Honors Program, an inter-disciplinary curriculum for undergraduate students, established with Dr. Ada W. Long as first director.

1983: Dr. Sara Ruiz de Molina was named acting dean of Special Studies.

January 1, 1984: Dr. James H. Woodward, Jr., became third vice president for University College; he served until June 1989 when the office was renamed Academic Affairs.

January 21, 1984: The Business and Engineering Complex was dedicated.

February 3, 1984: Dr. Joaquin Aldrete led the team that performed the first liver transplant at University Hospital. The patient was a five-year old boy from Alabama.

September 1, 1984: Lung Health Center was established at UAB with Dr. William C. Bailey as director. The center received approval of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees on December 4, 1986.

September 1, 1984: Ken Letson became UAB's second Sports Information director.

September 1, 1984: Dr. Blaine A. Brownell became second dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

September 23, 1984: The Tinsley Harrison Tower was dedicated.

November 9, 1984: Dr. Harriet P. Dustan delivered the twenty-first Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Alabama and The Golden Age of Medical Research."

November 15, 1984: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the change of UAB's name from the "University of Alabama in Birmingham" to the "University of Alabama at Birmingham."

November 16, 1984: The Basic Health Science Education and Research Building was dedicated.

1984: Dr. Jay Goldman named third dean of the School of Engineering, succeeding Dr. Edmond Miller who had served as interim.

1984: Joann Beddow became the first head coach of the new Women's Golf team.

1984: The Phoenix, a magazine for the university community published by UAB journalism students, debuted in the winter. Brent H. Morgan was the magazine’s first editor.

1984: The first use in the United States of a color doppler echocardiograph for visualizing internal cardiac structures occurred at University Hospital.

1984: Dr. Theodore M. Benditt named fourth dean of the School of Humanities.

1984: Dr. Anthony C. L. Barnard named dean and co-director of the Graduate School.

January 1, 1985: Dr. Jerry W. Stephens became second director of the Mervyn H. Sterne Library.

January 23, 1985: First baby was born as a result of the UAB In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) program. Dr. Kathryn Honea, IVF program director, attended the baby girl’s birth at the mother’s local hospital.

April 18, 1985: UAB's new baseball field was officially dedicated as the Jerry D. Young Memorial Field.

April 25, 1985: Residence hall for nursing students at UAB was rededicated as Florence A. Hixson Hall.

June 1, 1985: Dr. Sara Ruiz de Molina became second dean of Special Studies.

June 2, 1985: Dr. J. Durwood Bradley, Jr., chief of staff at the hospital, became the first recipient of The President's Medal, given for distinguished service to UAB.

June 27, 1985: Center for Health Risk Assessment and Disease Prevention was established.

July 1, 1985: The university launched the first Capital Campaign with a goal of $25 million.

September 26, 1985: The Center for Telecommunications Education and Research was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Warren T. Jones and David A. Conner were named as center co-directors.

November 13, 1985: Diabetes Research and Education Building was rededicated as the Boshell Diabetes Research and Education Building.

November 15, 1985: Dr. Leonard H. Robinson delivered the twenty-second Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Excellence Revisited: Prescription for The Future."

November 24, 1985: Birmingham's Visitors and Information Center at UAB was dedicated at 1201 University Boulevard.

December 5, 1985: The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography and the Sleep/Wake Disorders Center were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Charles E. Bugg was named as first director of the crystallography center, and Dr. Virgil Wooten was founding director of the Sleep/Wake center.

1985: Angela Tower, a dance student at UAB, was named Miss Alabama. She later went on to become the fourth runner up in the Miss America pageant in Atlantic City.

1985: W. Grant Shingleton became UAB's third Sports Information director.

January 23, 1986: The University of Alabama Hospitals was renamed as The University of Alabama Hospital; but it remained more commonly known as "University Hospital."

February 28, 1986: The UAB student chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) received its charter. The chapter later went dormant but was reactivated during the fall of 2003.

April 3, 1986: The Geriatric Education Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Glenn H. Hughes was named as first director of the center.

April 3, 1986: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees formally approved the UAB Epilepsy Center, which had been initiated in 1981.

April 3, 1986: The Lister Hill Center for Health Policy and the Center for Nuclear Imaging Research were established by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. William F. Bridgers was named first director of the Lister Hill Center. Dr. Gerald M. Pohost was named director of the nuclear imaging center.

May 1986: UAB acquired the Mary Lewis Convalescent Home, a 45-bed facility.

May 1986: Upon the retirement of Harry "the Hat" Walker, assistant coach Pete Rancont was named as the second head coach of Men's Baseball

June 3, 1986: Cudworth Hall was renamed the UAB Continuing Education Center.

June 7, 1986: The first five students graduated from the UAB Honors Program.

June 26, 1986: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Injury Control Research Center with Dr. P. Russ Fine as first director.

July 1, 1986: Dr. Richard R. Ranney became the fourth dean of the School of Dentistry.

August 1, 1986: Dr. Bradford W. Wild became second dean of the School of Optometry.

September 1, 1986: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., vice president for Health Affairs, became acting president of UAB during the one-year sabbatical of President S. Richardson Hill, Jr.

September 25, 1986: The Comprehensive Head Injury Center, which had been initiated at UAB in 1986, received approval by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Thomas J. Boll was later named as the center's first director.

September 25, 1986: The Center for Reproductive Health and Genetics was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Sara C. Finley and Hugh M. Shingleton were named co-directors of the center.

September 25, 1986: Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Immunological Diseases, created in 1985 with funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, was formally approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. J. Claude Bennett was the center's first director.

October 15, 1986: International House was rededicated in honor of Joseph S. and Bertha Pizitz Smolian.

November 14, 1986: Dr. Charles E. Butterworth, Jr., delivered the twenty-third Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Function of A University Professor."

1986: Antoinette “Toni” Nordan became curator of the UAB Visual Arts Gallery.

January 22, 1987: Parkinson's Disease Association Information and Referral Center, established in 1986, was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. James H. Halsey, Jr., served as the center's first director.

February 18, 1987: The Neurobiology Research Center was established.

April 2, 1987: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., became third president of UAB.

April 1987: Mickey Pizitz Memorial Pool opened as an addition to Spain Rehabilitation Center.

June 2, 1987: School of Community and Allied Health was renamed the School of Health Related Professions, Dr. Keith D. Blayney remained as dean.

June 17, 1987: The Center for Research in Oral Biology superseded the Institute of Dental Research. Dr. Henning Birkedal-Hansen was first director of the center.

September 1, 1987: Effective on this date, all “indoor public areas” of the UAB Medical Center became smoke free.

October 30, 1987: Dr. Dan W. Urry delivered the twenty-fourth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Of Molecules, Motion, Man, and Machines."

October 1987: Mervyn H. Sterne Library was rededicated after the completion of a major expansion and renovation project.

November 1, 1987: Dr. Rachel Z. Booth became third dean of the School of Nursing.

December 4, 1987: The Center for Economic Education was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Henry N. McCarl was named as the center's first director.

December 1987: UAB South opened in an International Park office building.

1987: World's first genetically engineered mouse-human monoclonal antibody was used at University Hospital in the treatment of cancer.

1987: Dr. Clint Bruess was named third dean of the School of Education.

1987: Jeannie Milling became the head coach of the Women's Basketball team.

1987: The movie, “The Verne Miller Story,” was released. Shot partially in Birmingham the previous year, some scenes had been filmed in UAB’s Woodward House. (This film was also called “Gangland”)

1987: Center for Reproductive Health and Genetics opened in renovated Byrd Building.

1987: The School of Humanities was renamed the School of Arts and Humanities; Dr. Theodore M. Benditt remained as dean.

1987: The UAB Research Foundation was formed as a non-profit corporation with the mission to identify, assess, and market commercially viable technology developed at UAB.

January 1988: In response to the growing AIDS epidemic, the 1917 Clinic was opened at UAB. The clinic, which took its name from the building’s street address in order to protect the confidentiality of patients, was founded and first directed by Dr. Michael S. Saag.

April 1, 1988: Dr. John R. Durant became vice president for Health Affairs, succeeding Dr. J. Durwood Bradley who had served as interim vice president since the previous July.

April 1988: Dr. Robert Glaze became first vice president for Research Development.

May 6, 1988: The Center for Management Study was established with Dr. M. Gene Newport as first center director.

May 19, 1988: UAB Arena was dedicated.

May 1988: The Center for Neuroimmunology was established.

June 27, 1988: The first heart-lung transplant in Alabama was performed at University Hospital by a team headed by Drs. James K. Kirklin and George L. Zorn, Jr.

June 1988: Dr. Dick D. Briggs became acting president of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

August 1, 1988: UAB initiated an escort service through the UAB Police Department for any student, employee or visitor between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and midnight.

September 1, 1988: Virginia L. Algermissen became third director of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

September 9, 1988: The William Gorgas Center for Geographic Medicine was established.

October 14, 1988: The Doctors' Center Building was rededicated as the Paul S. Worrell Building.

November 18, 1988: Dr. Basil I. Hirschowitz selected as the twenty-fifth Distinguished Faculty Lecturer. His lecture was titled "Fiberoptics: Retrospect and Prospect."

November 1988: UAB Travel Center opened in the Burleson Building.

December 9, 1988: The Center for AIDS Research was formally approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Eric Hunter was the center's first director.

December 1988: Dr. Dick D. Briggs became the third president of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

1988: Regional Ectodermal Dysplasia Diagnosis and Treatment Center was established with Dr. J. Timothy Wright as director.

1988: Dr. Max D. Cooper was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, the first UAB faculty member to be so honored.

1988: Dr. Terry L. Hickey named dean and co-director of the Graduate School.

March 8, 1989: Dr. Juan M. Navia became acting dean of the School of Public Health.

March 15, 1989: Dr. Kenneth J. Roozen became first vice president for University Affairs.

March 15, 1989: Linda Flaherty-Goldsmith became University Treasurer.

March 15, 1989: Dr. John M. Lyons became first vice president for Planning and Information Management.

April 23, 1989: The first artificial heart used in Alabama was implanted at University Hospital as a temporary measure while the patient awaited a heart transplant. Dr. William L. Holman implanted the ventricular-assist device.

April 27, 1989: UAB celebrated $100 million in active grants and contracts.

June 4, 1989: The UAB Mace, designed by local artist Cordray Parker, was first used during the university’s commencement. Dr. Virginia D. Horns-Marsh carried the mace into the ceremony. It was commissioned by Dr. and Mrs. Samuel B. Barker.

July 1, 1989: Dr. L. Clark Taylor, Jr., became administrator of University Hospital.

September 22, 1989: The Civitan International Research Center approved as an official UAB center by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

September 27, 1989: A groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Center for Psychiatric Medicine.

October 1, 1989: The designation University College was replaced by the designation Academic Affairs, and Dr. Tennant S. McWilliams became interim vice president for Academic Affairs.

October 5, 1989: Dr. George L. Zorn, Jr., headed the team that performed the state’s first lung transplant at University Hospital. The patient was from Arab, Alabama.

October 13, 1989: The groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Civitan International Research Center.

November 16, 1989: Dr. Victor J. Matukas was named interim dean of the School of Dentistry.

December 8, 1989: Center for Community Health Resources Development was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

1989: Dr. Philip E. Austin became third chancellor of The University of Alabama System.

1989: Derek J. Tarr became the first head coach of the new Men's Tennis team.

1989: Alabama's first skin grafting procedure using laboratory-cultured skin for treatment of severe burns occurred at University Hospital.

1989: The Smolian House and the Friendship House were sold by UAB.

1989: Dr. Harold M. Fullmer delivered the twenty-sixth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Dental Research from Antiquity to the Present."

1989: Active extramural grants and contracts at UAB totaled $105,571,876.

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January 1, 1990: Effective on this date, all buildings, grounds, offices, parking lots, and parking decks at UAB became smoke free.

April 1990: Dr. Juan M. Navia became second dean of the School of Public Health.

June 3, 1990: At the 20th annual commencement, UAB recognized the school’s 50,000th graduate, Michelle Hight who received a bachelor’s degree in marketing. At the ceremony, 3,338 degrees and certificates were awarded.

June 5, 1990: Groundbreaking was held for the Bevill Biomedical Research Building.

June 22, 1990: UAB Vaccine Center was established. Dr. Jerry R. McGhee served as the center's first director.

August 1, 1990: Dr. Tennant S. McWilliams became third dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, succeeding Belinda McCarthy who had served as interim dean since June first.

August 1, 1990: Dr. William A. Sibley became first vice president for Academic Affairs.

September 1, 1990: Dr. Virginia D. Gauld became second vice president for Student Affairs. She was the first female vice president at UAB.

October 1, 1990: UAB Campus Taxi began as a service to the UAB community. The service, which began with two vehicles, was available Monday through Friday at 40 predetermined locations around the campus.

October 1990: Dr. John H. Walker became interim vice president for Administration. In 1992 he became interim vice president for Administration and Human Resources when the office was reorganized.

November 9, 1990: Dr. Juan M. Navia delivered the twenty-seventh Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "On the Idea of a University: Personal Reflections."

November 1990: UAB Blazers became one of the charter members of the new Great Midwest Conference.

1990: Alabama's first use of single-fiber arthroscope for monitoring the treatment of arthritis occurred at University Hospital.

1990: Dr. Victor J. Matukas was named fifth dean of the School of Dentistry after having served as interim dean since November 16, 1989.

1990: The Ben S. Weil Endowed Chair of Industrial Distribution was established in the School of Business as the first non-medical endowed chair at UAB.

1990: The first use of a monoclonal antibody to treat rheumatoid arthritis occurred at University Hospital.

1990: UAB awarded its 50,000th degree.

February 20, 1991: Twin Towers, a student residence, was renamed Camp Hall in honor of Ehney A. Camp, a former member of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

March 13, 1991: Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., announced that UAB would field an NCAA Division III football team. Dr. Jim Hilyer, who had served as coach of the club team for its two seasons, was named head coach.

May 3, 1991: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Teaching and Learning Center.

May 17, 1991: University Center was renamed and rededicated as the Hill University Center in honor of UAB's second president, Dr. S. Richardson Hill, Jr.

September 7, 1991: The UAB football team played its first intercollegiate football game, losing 28-0 to Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi.

September 13, 1991: Center for Psychiatric Medicine received approval from The University of Alabama Board of Trustees as an official UAB center.

September 21, 1991: The UAB football team gained its first win with a 34-21 victory over Washington and Lee.

October 17, 1991: The West Pavilion of University Hospital was dedicated.

October 1991: Richard Deason became interim General Manager of WBHM-FM Radio.

December 8, 1991: The first UAB National Alumni Society Distinguished Alumnus Award was presented to Dr. Lawrence J. DeLucas during commencement exercises.

December 13, 1991: Alzheimer's Disease Center established.

December 1991: UAB Clinic Inverness opened.

1991: Dr. Kenneth J. Roozen became first vice president for Research and University Affairs, after the merger of the offices of research development and university affairs.

1991: First UAB Outdoor Sculpture Display competition was held.

1991: The first Bone Marrow Transplant was performed at UAB.

1991: Dr. Joan F. Lorden received the first Carolyn P. and Charles W. Ireland Prize for Scholarly Distinction.

1991: Vice presidents Dr. John R. Durant and Dr. William A. Sibley became acting deans and co-directors of the Graduate School.

January 1, 1992: Dr. O. Dale Williams became dean of the School of Public Health.

January 17, 1992: Dr. Lionel M. Bargeron, Jr., delivered the twenty-eighth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Remembrance of Things Past."

January 1992: James A. Lee was named acting administrator of University Hospital.

January 1992: Dr. Martha C. Nussbaum, of Brown University, was selected as the first Caroline and Charles W. Ireland Distinguished Visiting Scholar. Her visit to UAB included a public lecture on Greek tragedy and Aristotle’s Poetics.

February 1992: The UAB Arena office towers opened.

February 4, 1992: Michael L. Morgan became third General Manager of WBHM-FM Radio.

April 28, 1992: A new facility for the Smolian International House was dedicated.

May 26, 1992: Dr. Charles L. Joiner named second dean of the School of Health Related Professions, after having served as interim dean since January first.

June 5, 1992: The Kirklin Clinic was dedicated.

June 8, 1992: UAB police officer was shot while on a routine patrol, the first such injury in the history of the department. The injury required surgery but was not life threatening.

June 25-July 9, 1992: UAB faculty member and alumnus Dr. Lawrence J. DeLucas participated in NASA space mission STS-50 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia.

June 30, 1992: Center for Psychiatric Medicine was dedicated.

July 1, 1992: Dr. Charlie W. Scott became interim dean of the School of Medicine.

July 14, 1992: Civitan International Research Center was dedicated.

September 28, 1992:U.S. News and World Report named UAB as the number one up-and-coming university in the United States.

October 30, 1992: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved renaming the UAB Medical Center as the UAB Academic Health Center.

October 1992: A 7.5 foot tall statue of Christopher Columbus was dedicated at UAB’s Smolian International House on Columbus Day. The marble statue was carved by sculptor Ugo Sordelli

November 13, 1992: Dr. Jiri F. Mestecky delivered the twenty-ninth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "New Challenges and New Prospects for Vaccines."

November 1992: UAB Archives formally established as a campus-wide unit. Virginia E. Fisher was named first University Archivist.

1992: Nancy W. Clemmons became acting director of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

1992: Dr. John N. Whitaker became the fourth president of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

1992: Mert Ertunga became the first head coach of the new Women's Tennis team.

January 18, 1993: UAB first observed Martin Luther King, Jr., Day as an institutional holiday.

January 1993: Dr. Harold J. Fallon became dean of the School of Medicine.

February 25, 1993: UAB Comprehensive Head Injury Center renamed Southeastern Comprehensive Head Injury Center.

March 23, 1993: In the first night game held at the Jerry D. Young Memorial Field, the Men's Baseball team defeated Southern Mississippi by a score of 6 to 4.

March 1993: Linda Flaherty-Goldsmith was named first vice president for Financial Affairs.

May 11, 1993: The Bevill Biomedical Research Building was dedicated.

June 16, 1993: Groundbreaking was held for the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center.

June 25, 1993: South Hall, a student residence, was renamed and rededicated as Rast Hall in honor of Thomas E. Rast, a former member of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

July 1993: Dr. J. Claude Bennett was named to succeed Dr. Charles A. McCallum, Jr., as president of UAB.

September 6, 1993: In a game against Troy State University, the UAB football team played its first game as a Division I-AA scholarship team.

September 17, 1993: The Center for Obstetric Research (later renamed the Center for Research in Women's Reproductive Health) was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Robert L. Goldenberg was named as the center's first director.

September 17, 1993: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Liver Center. Dr. Harold J. Fallon was named as interim director of the new center.

October 1, 1993: Dr. J. Claude Bennett assumed office as the fourth president of UAB.

October 4, 1993: Kevin E. Lofton became first executive director of University Hospital and the first African American to direct University Hospital.

December 3, 1993: Dr. Charles E. Bugg delivered the thirtieth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Magic of Crystals."

December 1993: Drs. George L. Zorn, Jr., and David C. McGiffin performed University Hospital’s first double-lung transplant on a 41-year-old patient from Florida.

1993: Central Bank Building was renovated and renamed the UAB Administration Building.

1993: UAB first presented its Outstanding Women’s Award to several university administrators, faculty, staff and students. Dr. Virginia Gauld, Betty Jean Duff and Debra Strother received awards for administrator/staff. Dr. Ada Long received the award for faculty. Janet Cash received the award for students.

1993: Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention was established.

1993: Dr. Kenneth J. Roozen was named executive vice president.

1993: UAB's economic impact on the Birmingham region was estimated at more than $1.5 billion per year.

January 1, 1994: Walker College, an independent school in Jasper, Alabama, was acquired and renamed UAB Walker College.

January 1, 1994: Dr. Arol R. Augsburger became the third dean of the School of Optometry.

March 21, 1994: The Samuel Ullman Museum on 15th Avenue South opened as a UAB facility dedicated to Birmingham educational reformer and poet Samuel Ullman.

March 1994: Samuel W. Jackson, Jr., was named first vice president for Financial Affairs and Administration.

May 1994: President J. Claude Bennett organized an ad hoc committee to explore faculty governance possibilities on campus.

June 10, 1994: Frank and Kathleen Ellis Ryals School of Public Health Building groundbreaking ceremony was held.

June 24, 1994: The Environment Awareness Research Technology and Health (EARTH) Center was established with Melinda M. Lalor serving as interim director of the new center.

July 1, 1994: UAB Clinic Bessemer and UAB Clinic Roebuck were opened.

August 23, 1994: Dr. J. Claude Bennett announced plans for the UAB football team to advance to NCAA Division I-A play in 1996.

September, 1994: Active extramural grants and contracts totaled $167,546,543.

September 14, 1994: Construction began on a major expansion of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

September 17, 1994: The UAB Marching Blazers, a new 135-member student band, debuted in its first home game at Legion Field. Brian Wilson was the first drum major/field conductor; Clifford "Ski" Winter, an associate professor of music, was first director of bands.

September 21, 1994: At a University-wide picnic in the Mini Park, UAB celebrated its 25th anniversary as an independent campus.

September 20, 1994: The Center for Industrial and Applied Research/Genesis Center received approval as an official UAB center by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

October 14, 1994: School of Optometry Building was renamed the Henry B. Peters Building.

October 22, 1994: UAB first celebrated Homecoming during the fall. Previously, festivities had been held in conjunction with the basketball season.

November 18, 1994: Dr. Arnold G. Diethelm delivered the thirty-first Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Patient."

December 3, 1994: Dr. Joan F. Lorden became dean of the Graduate School.

December 15, 1994: The Center for Health Promotion was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

1994: UAB became the first Alabama university to achieve Research University I status in the Carnegie Foundation classification.

1994: Thomas C. Thrasher became interim vice president for Financial Affairs.

1994: Dr. Suzanne Oparil became the fifth Medical Center physician to become president of the American Heart Association.

January 1, 1995: Dr. Sergio B. Stagno became interim vice president for Health Affairs.

January 2, 1995: Watson Brown was named head football coach at UAB.

January 16, 1995: The first simultaneous heart-kidney transplant in the Southeast was performed at UAB by Drs. David C. McGiffin and David Laskow.

February 17, 1995: Specialized Caries Research Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

April 21, 1995: The Stroke Research Center renamed Comprehensive Stroke Research Center.

April 24, 1995: UAB Blazers became one of the charter members of Conference USA (C-USA).

June 23, 1995: Cell Adhesion and Matrix Research Center was established.

August 21, 1995: Dr. Michael A. Geheb became first director of the UAB Health Systems with oversight and coordination of the UAB Hospital, Health Services Foundation, Triton, and clinical activities of the faculty.

August 1995: Paul Harbin became the first head coach of the new Women's Soccer team.

September 1995: Carol Van Gilder became first director of the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center.

September 1995: Jack Mott retired as president of UAB Walker College and was succeeded by interim president David Rowland.

September 1995: UAB celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Academic Health Center.

October 1, 1995: UAB assumed administrative responsibility of the School of Primary Medical Care and the University Medical Clinics of the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH). It was renamed the "University of Alabama School of Medicine Huntsville Program."

October 1, 1995: Dr. Scott Buchalter became University Hospital's second chief-of-staff.

October 14, 1995: The UAB football team had its first win over an NCAA Division I-A opponent, beating North Texas 19-14.

October 18, 1995: Blaze the dragon was unveiled as the new UAB mascot.

October 27, 1995: T. Scott Plutchak became fourth director of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.

November 17, 1995: Dr. Albert F. LoBuglio delivered the thirty-second Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "UAB Research - Is the Cup Half Empty?"

November 1995: Local press revealed university plans to possibly lease or sell University Hospital.

December 14, 1995: The Center for Educational Accountability was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. James E. McLean served as the first director.

December 14, 1995: The Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center was formally established by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Tim M. Townes and Josef T. Prchal were named as co-directors of the center.

December 14, 1995: The Sexually Transmitted Diseases Cooperative Research Center (later renamed the Center for Social Medicine and Sexually Transmitted Diseases) was formally established by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Edward W. Hook III was named first director of the center.

1995: New Co., a limited liability company directed by Jim Little, was formed to establish a network of primary-care physicians in Alabama.

1995: Physical Sciences Building was renamed the Chemistry Building.

1995: The Offices of Vice President for Health Affairs and Vice President for Academic Affairs were abolished and replaced by a new Provost's Office. Dr. Kenneth J. Roozen was named first provost.

1995: Harold L. Abroms became interim vice president for University Advancement, a newly established administrative office.

1995: UAB Osteoporosis Treatment and Prevention Center was established.

1995: A new university-wide faculty senate was organized.

January 1996: Dr. Charlotte G. Borst became first executive director of UAB Historical Collections, comprised by the Reynolds Historical Library, the Alabama Museum of the Health Sciences, and the UAB Archives.

January 6, 1996: Blaze the dragon, UAB's new mascot, made its first public appearance during a basketball game at the UAB Arena.

March 1, 1996: A UAB Health Center opened in Homewood.

March 1, 1996: Fred Brooke Lee became first vice president for University Advancement.

April 19, 1996: The Center for Metabolic Bone Disease and the Center for Radical Free Cell Biology were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Jay M. McDonald was named as first director of the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease. Dr. Bruce A. Freeman was named as first director of the Center for Radical Free Cell Biology.

April 19, 1996: Center for Biomedical Sciences was renamed UAB Biomedical Implant Center by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

April 1996: Murry Bartow became the second head coach of the Men's Basketball team.

May 1996: It was reported that UAB's economic impact on the local community was more than $1.55 billion for FY 1995, an increase of over $100 million since 1993 and more than double its 1985 economic impact.

June 4, 1996: Dedication ceremonies were held for the UAB Cardiac Rhythm Management (CRM) Laboratory.

June 28, 1996: The journal Science named three UAB faculty, Drs. Michael Saag, George M. Shaw, and Beatrice H. Hahn, among the top 10 AIDS researchers in the country, and highlighted the AIDS research program at UAB.

July 1, 1996: UAB Options established to assist the non-traditional student and administer non-credit courses, it superseded the UAB Special Studies program.

July 1, 1996: Dr. Charlotte G. Borst, executive director of Historical Collections, became second University Archivist.

July 1996: Dr. Eli Capilouto was named fourth dean of the School of Public Health after having served as interim dean since November 4, 1994.

July 1996: West Field on the UAB campus was used as a practice site for several soccer teams participating in matches played in Birmingham's Legion Field as part of the 1996 Centennial Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia.

August 31, 1996: For fiscal year 1995-1996, the UAB Research Foundation topped $1 million in license income. UAB became one of about 30 institutions nationwide to reach that amount in annual license income.

August 31, 1996: The Football team lost to Auburn in the first UAB game as an NCAA Division I-A school.

September 22, 1996: Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center officially opened with Leonard Slatkin conducting the National Symphony Orchestra.

September 27, 1996: University of Alabama Board of Trustee member John T. Oliver, Jr., was named interim Chancellor of The University of Alabama System effective October first.

September 27, 1996: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Research in Applied Gerontology.

October 1, 1996: UAB Health System, a nonprofit entity, established in a joint operating agreement between The University of Alabama Board of Trustees and the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

October 18, 1996: Dr. Gail H. Cassell delivered the thirty-third Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Emerging Infections: A Global Threat."

October 29, 1996: The Frank and Kathleen Ellis Ryals School of Public Health Building was dedicated.

November 13, 1996: President J. Claude Bennett announced plans to resign his presidency effective January 1, 1997. Interim Chancellor John T. Oliver, Jr., introduced Paul Hardin as interim president of UAB.

November 1996: Dr. Michael A. Geheb, director of UAB Health Systems, was named interim chief executive officer of the UAB Health System Managing Board.

December 12, 1996: Center for Obstetric Research was renamed the Center for Research in Women's Health by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

December 12, 1996: Center for Sexually Transmitted Diseases Cooperative Research Center was renamed the UAB Center for Social Medicine and Sexually Transmitted Diseases by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

December 12, 1996: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the renaming of buildings in honor of Gene Bartow and of Drs. Charles A. McCallum and James A. Pittman, Jr.

December 12, 1996: The Clinical Nutrition Research Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Roland L. Weinsier was named as first director of the new center.

December 12, 1996: The Howell and Elizabeth Heflin Center for Human Genetics was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

December 12, 1996: The UAB Laser and Photonics Research Center (later renamed as the Center for Optical Sensors and Spectroscopies) was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. David L. Shealy served as the center's first director.

December 23, 1996: UAB assumed 100% ownership of Triton Health Systems and its VIVA Health HMO subsidiary. John Cline was later named interim CEO of VIVA Health.

December 1996: Linda Flaherty-Goldsmith became interim vice president for Financial Affairs and Administration.

1996: President J. Claude Bennett was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences becoming the second UAB physician to be so honored.

1996: The 4,000th kidney transplant was performed at University Hospital.

1996: John J. McMahon, Jr., became first chair of the UAB Health System Managing Board.

1996: With a new $2.3 million five-year grant, UAB became one of the nation's four Oral Cancer Research Centers. Dr. Jeffrey A. Engler was named as first director of the center.

1996: Dr. Albert W. Niemi, Jr., became third dean of the School of Business.

1996: Dr. Stephen A. Szygenda became fourth dean of the School of Engineering.

1996: David L. Abrams became interim president of UAB Walker College.

1996: In a survey by the National Research Corporation, University Hospital was named one of the most preferred hospitals in the nation for overall health-care services.

January 1, 1997: Paul Hardin became interim president of UAB.

January 23, 1997: Dr. Michael A. Geheb, director of UAB Health Systems, was named chief executive officer of the UAB Health System Managing Board.

January 25, 1997: UAB Arena was officially rededicated as Bartow Arena.

February 1, 1997: Dr. Peter V. O'Neil became interim provost, and Dr. Michael J. Neilson became acting dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

March 4, 1997: The Harry "the Hat" Walker Press Box was officially dedicated at the Jerry D. Young Memorial Field.

March 5, 1997: Dr. Mary Lynne Capilouto was named interim dean of the School of Dentistry.

April 1, 1997: J. Foster Watkins became president of UAB Walker College.

April 8, 1997: Dr. William B. Deal named interim dean of the School of Medicine.

April 17, 1997: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees delegated full authority of Triton Health Systems and its VIVA Health HMO subsidiary to the UAB Health System Managing Board.

May 2, 1997: The renovated and expanded Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences was rededicated.

May 1997: UAB Genesis Center completed as the first of 25 buildings planned for the new 100-acre UAB Research Park at Oxmoor.

June 1, 1997: Dr. Thomas C. Meredith became fourth chancellor of The University of Alabama System.

June 1997: HealthSouth CEO and UAB alumnus Richard M. Scrushy agreed to donate $2 million for construction of a new building for the School of Health Related Professions.

July 1, 1997: The independent Eye Foundation Hospital was acquired by the UAB Health System and renamed the Eye Foundation Hospital at UAB.

July 17, 1997: Dr. W. Ann Reynolds was named president-elect of UAB, the first female president in the history of the three-campus University of Alabama System.

July 1997: Dr. W. Jack Duncan became interim dean of the School of Business.

September 1, 1997: The UAB Genesis Center was renamed the OADI Technology Center.

September 3, 1997: Drs. James K. Kirklin and David McGiffin headed the team which performed UAB's 500th heart transplant.

September 15, 1997: Dr. W. Ann Reynolds became fifth president of UAB.

September 17, 1997: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the name change of the Center for the Advancement of Developing Industries to the Office for the Advancement of Developing Industries Technology Center.

October 2, 1997: Ground was broken for the Richard M. Scrushy Building, future home of the School of Health Related Professions.

October 24, 1997: Dr. Suzanne Oparil delivered the thirty-fourth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Academic Family Values, or Can This Marriage Be Saved?"

November 6, 1997: A grand opening celebration was held for the new OADI Technology Center, the first building constructed in the UAB Research Park at Oxmoor.

November 1997: Dr. William B. Deal became dean of the School of Medicine after having served as interim since April.

1997: General Clinical Research Center was awarded a $20 million extension from the National Institutes of Health, the largest single grant in UAB history.

1997: Research grants and extramural funding in the School of Optometry exceeded $27 million, the largest amount for any optometry school or college in the world.

1997: The University of Alabama Hospital became the first hospital in the state to win the national “Top 100 Hospital’s Benchmarks for Success” award.

January 1, 1998: Dr. Shirley Salloway Kahn became interim vice president for Financial Affairs and Administration.

January 1, 1998 Ann Dumaresq became second director of the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center.

January 25, 1998: The Sorority Square Building, the renovated former Van Corr Building, officially opened to provide housing suites for five UAB sororities.

January 1998: President W. Ann Reynolds announced plans to dissolve the five-year cooperative agreement with UAB Walker College in Jasper.

February 6, 1998: Martin C. Nowak became interim executive director of University Hospital.

March 1998: Odessa Woolfolk Community Service Award established and first awarded to Associate Professor Linda W. Goodson.

March 20, 1998: UAB Walker College was returned to control of the Walker College Foundation, ending the merger agreement with UAB.

March 20, 1998: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Chemoprevention Center with Dr. Clinton J. Grubbs as first director.

April 24, 1998: Brad Rollow was named interim CEO of VIVA Health, Inc.

April 1998: Richard L. Margison became vice president for Financial Affairs and Administration.

April 1998: UAB announced that the men's track and field program would be eliminated at the end of the current academic year due to Title IX regulations requiring equity in men's and women's programs.

May 13, 1998: Dr. Mary Lynn Capilouto was named sixth dean of the School of Dentistry after having served as interim dean since March 1997.

June 10, 1998: The 1,000th laser vision correction procedure was performed at the Eye Foundation Hospital at UAB.

June 15, 1998: The 500th liver transplant was conducted at University Hospital.

June 25, 1998: After having served as interim since 1997, Dr. Peter V. O'Neil was named UAB's second Provost.

June 26, 1998: The Center for Contraceptive Research and Technology Transfer and the Center for the Study of Ethics and Values in the Sciences were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. George A. Graham was named as first director of the Ethics and Values center.

June 26, 1998: The Center for Community Outreach Development and the Southeast Center for Excellence in Geriatric Medicine were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Stephen L. Hajduk and Richard M. Allman were named directors of the centers.

July 1, 1998: UAB Historical Collections became part of the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Library Director T. Scott Plutchak was named interim executive director.

July 1998: Dr. James B. McClintock was named interim dean of the Schhool of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

July 1998: Dr. Jane F. Milley was named interim dean of the School of Arts and Humanities.

August 9, 1998: Marla Townsend became the first head coach of the new Women's Fast-Pitch Softball team.

August 1998: Dr. Shirley Salloway Khan named interim vice president for Development, Alumni, and External Relations.

September 18, 1998: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the University Transportation Center, a joint effort of all three of the System's three campuses.

September 19, 1998: In the largest crowd to view a UAB football game at Legion Field, 30,543 people saw the UAB Blazers fall to the University of Kansas by the score of 39 to 37 in the fourth overtime.

September 1998: Dr. Robert E. Holmes named fourth dean of the School of Business, to succeed interim dean Dr. W. Jack Duncan on January 1, 1999.

September 1998: UAB's economic impact on the Birmingham region was estimated at more than $2 billion per year.

October 12, 1998: Howell and Elizabeth Ann Heflin Center for Human Genetics groundbreaking held.

October 16, 1998: Dr. Richard J. Whitley presented the thirty-fifth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Herpes Simplex Virus Infections of the Central Nervous System: 25 Years Out, One Year In."

October 26, 1998: Dr. Michael A. Geheb, first director and CEO of the UAB Health System, announced his resignation effective December 5, 1998, and Dr. William B. Deal was named interim director and CEO.

October 1998: UAB awarded $750,000 as part of the Fannie Mae Foundation's 1998 University-Community Partnership Program, one of the largest non-medical grants in University history.

December 4, 1998: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research and Education.

1998: Hejal C. Patel, a first-year medical student, was named to USA Today’s All-USA College Academic First Team. He was the first UAB student to be so honored.

January 31, 1999: Researchers Drs. Beatrice H. Hahn, George M. Shaw, and Feng Gao announced the discovery of the origin of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), the virus that causes AIDS in humans.

February 19, 1999: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved a major expansion and renovation plan for University Hospital.

February 19, 1999: The Center for Join Replacement, which had been established in 1998, was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. John M. Cuckler was the center's first director.

February 19, 1999: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Gene Therapy Center, which had been established in 1998. Dr. David T. Curiel was named as the first director of the center.

March 1, 1999: Amy O'Donnell became the first head coach of the new Women's Synchronized Swimming team after having served as advisor to the developing program since 1998. UAB competition began in the fall.

March 1999: UAB ranked 28th in the nation and fourth in the South in the list of universities receiving federal research and development funding.

May 1, 1999: UAB Health Center in Moody opened.

May 4, 1999: Martin C. Nowak was named second executive director of University Hospital.

May 16, 1999: A performance of "Cabaret" ended the 49-year run of Town and Gown Theatre and UAB's use of the Clark Memorial Theater on Hatcher Place.

June 16, 1999: UAB alumnus Larry Giangrosso became the third head coach of the Men's Baseball team.

June 25, 1999: Sidney L. McDonald was elected president pro tem of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

July 1999: Dr. James B. McClintock was named third dean of the School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics.

August 1, 1999: UAB Health Center in Hoover opened.

August 1999: Dr. Shirley Salloway Kahn named first vice president for Development, Alumni and External Relations.

August 1999: Dr. Clair W. Goldsmith became first vice president for Information Technology.

August 1999: Caron Van Gilder Thornton, founding director, was reappointed director of the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center.

August 1999: Dr. Kirby I. Bland was named chair-designate of the Department of Surgery, to succeed Dr. Arnold G. Diethelm.

September 1, 1999: Bert Brouwer became interim dean of the School of Arts and Humanities.

September 1, 1999: A reorganization of the School of Business became effective, reducing the academic departments from five to three.

September 1, 1999: David J. Fine became second director and CEO of the UAB Health System.

September 7, 1999: Michael A. Flannery became associate director of UAB Historical Collections.

September 17, 1999: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Injury Sciences and the Mercedes-Benz CIREN (Crash Injury Research Engineering Network) Center. Dr. Loring W. Rue, III, was named as the first director of both centers.

September 17, 1999: The UAB Pancreaticobiliary Center and the UAB Voice Treatment Center were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

September 21, 1999: Drs. Anton J. Bueschen and Carlton J. Young performed the 5,000th kidney transplant at University Hospital.

September 26, 1999: An open house at the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center officially opened the Center's new venues, the Odess Theatre, the Sirote Theatre, and the Reynolds-Kirschbaum Recital Hall.

September 27, 1999: The General Clinical Research Center was formally dedicated as the Pittman General Clinical Research Center in honor of Dr. James A. Pittman, Jr.

September 1999: Dr. Adeniyi Coker, Jr., became director of UAB's new African American Studies program.

October 1, 1999: Dr. Michael J. Froning became interim dean of the School of Education.

October 1, 1999: Tim L. Pennycuff became third University Archivist.

October 29, 1999: Dr. Albert D. Pacifico presented the thirty-sixth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "The Early Days."

October 1999: The Eye Foundation Hospital at UAB was renamed the Callahan Eye Foundation Hospital at UAB in honor of founder Dr. Alston Callahan.

November 10, 1999:A Midsummer Night’s Dream opened as the first Department of Theatre production to be held in the new Sirote Theatre. The play was adapted by Karma Ibsen to be set in the Antebellum South.

November 18, 1999: The Women's Synchronized Swimming team debuted in an exhibition held in UAB's Bell Gym Aquatic Center.

November 19, 1999: The UAB Acute Chest Pain Center and the UAB Heart Center were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

November 19, 1999: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved an affiliation between UAB and the Southern Research Institute, a not-for-profit contract research organization with over $50 million in grants and contracts and which had been founded in 1941.

November 1999: The university launched a Capital Campaign with a goal of $250 million.

December 4, 1999: Neelaksh "Neel" Varshney, a senior electrical engineering major from Madison, Alabama, became the first UAB student chosen as a Rhodes Scholar.

1999: The AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Unit (AVEU) became the first evaluation unit to enter a Phase III trail of an AIDS vaccine.

1999: Paul W. Bryant, Jr., was elected to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

1999: Active extramural grants and contracts at UAB totaled $286,950,782.

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January 1, 2000: Dr. C. Michael Brooks became interim dean of the School of Health Related Professions.

February 5, 2000: A celebration held as part of alumni weekend marked the renovation of the School of Dentistry Building.

February 2000: An open house officially opened the Gambro Healthcare Birmingham-Central Building on the corner of University Boulevard and South 21st Street.

March 2000: An administration building for The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation was completed on South 22nd Street adjacent to The Kirklin Clinic.

April 21, 2000: The Center for Research on Child and Adolescent Development was approved by the University of Alabama Board of Trustees.

June 1, 2000: Dr. Linda C. Lucas was named interim dean of the School of Engineering.

June 1, 2000: Bert Brouwer became dean of the School of Arts and Humanities.

June 23, 2000: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Disaster Preparedness (later renamed in 2003 as the Center for Emergency Care and Disaster Preparedness). Dr. Thomas E. Terndrup was the center's first director.

July 14, 2000: Ground was broken for the North Pavilion, a major addition and replacement facility for University Hospital.

August 2000: The Carnegie I Research University designation was replaced with Carnegie’s new classification as a “Doctoral/Research-extensive University.”

September 14, 2000: The UAB Center for Education and Research on Therapeutics (CERTs) of Musculoskeletal Disorders was approved by the University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Kenneth G. Saag was named director of the new center.

September 25, 2000: Dr. Arol R. Augsburger was named interim provost effective October 15, 2000.

September 2000: UAB exceeded $300 million in active extramural grants and contracts.

October 1, 2000: Dr. Anton J. Bueschen became the fifth president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

October 7, 2000: Herman Frazier became UAB's second Director of Athletics. He had been named director in August but took office only after the 2000 Summer Olympic Games.

October 11, 2000: Dr. Larry J. DeLucas presented the thirty-seventh annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Space Exploration and NASA's Biotechnology Research Program."

October 15, 2000: Dr. John F. Amos became interim dean of the School of Optometry.

October 2000: The Department of Medicine passed its goal of $100 million in research funding, maintaining a national ranking of fourth in support from the National Institutes of Health .

November 17, 2000: Joe Espy III and Jacquelyn Shaia were elected to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Shaia, the first person elected to the Board with an undergraduate degree from UAB, later removed her name from consideration by the Alabama legislature.

November 17, 2000: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Surgical Research. Dr. Irshad H. Chaudry was named as the center's first director.

November 17, 2000: The UAB Center for Palliative Care was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. John L. Shuster was named director of the new center.

November 17, 2000: The Mental Retardation Research Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Michael J. Friedlander was named first director of the new center.

November 2000: The one-year old Capital Campaign reached its original goal of $250 million and UAB announced a revised comprehensive fund-raising goal of $350 million.

December 2000: Dr. Michael J. Froning was named fourth dean of the School of Education.

February 15, 2001: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the International Tuberculosis Center. Dr. Michael E. Kimerling was named first director of the center.

February 2001: Bob Lonergan was named chief executive officer of the UAB affiliated Southern Research Institute.

March 2, 2001: A statue of UAB's founding athletic director and first men's basketball coach Gene Bartow was dedicated in the Bartow Arena.

April 20, 2001: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Cleft and Craniofacial Center. Dr. John H. Grant, III, was named first director of the center.

April 2001: Dr. Harold P. Jones became the third dean of the School of Health Related Professions.

May 21, 2001: The Hugh Kaul Human Genetics Building and the Finley-Compass Bank Conference Center were dedicated.

June 26, 2001: The 13th Street Ensemble, UAB's professional equity theater company in residence at the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center, debuted with a performance of "Noises Off."

August 15, 2001: Dr. Max Michael, III, became the fifth dean of the School of Public Health.

August 15, 2001: Dr. Linda C. Lucas became the fifth dean of the School of Engineering.

August 2001: Classes began at UAB on a semester basis for the first time, the last university in the state of Alabama to convert from a quarter to a semester system.

September 13, 2001: Chancellor Thomas C. Meredith announced that Dr. W. Ann Reynolds would step down as UAB president in the summer of 2002.

October 15, 2001: Richard M. Scrushy and Andria Scott Hurst were elected to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees, becoming the first elected (and later confirmed) board members with undergraduate degrees from UAB.

October 26, 2001: Dr. Robert L. Goldenberg delivered the thirty-eighth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "A to Z: Alabama to Zambia."

November 19, 2001: The Center for Advanced Surgical Aesthetics was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Jorge I. de la Torre was named director of the new center.

2001: The UAB Health System and the Children's Health System announced the approval of a joint operating agreement that covered all pediatric and inpatient women's services and created the nonprofit entity, CWH.

2001: Brett Levine became the curator of the UAB Visual Arts Gallery.

January 1, 2002: Dr. Malcolm Portera became the fifth chancellor of The University of Alabama System.

January 1, 2002: William E. Smith, Jr., became the second chair of the UAB Health System Managing Board.

January 24, 2002: Richard M. Scrushy and Andria Scott Hurst were confirmed by the Alabama Legislature as members of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees, becoming the first confirmed board members with undergraduate degrees from UAB.

February 15, 2002: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the management agreement between the UAB Health System and Bessemer-Carraway Medical center, which was later renamed UAB Medical West. The five-year agreement began on April first.

February 19, 2002: Vonetta Flowers, UAB assistant track coach and former seven-time All-American track star at UAB, and her team-mate Jill Bakken won the Gold Medal in the inaugural Women's Bobsled event at the Winter Olympic Games held in Salt Lake City, Utah. Flowers became the first African American to win a gold medal in a Winter Olympic event.

March 18, 2002: An open house was held in the newly renovated Spencer Honors House.

April 4, 2002: Mike Anderson, a Birmingham native and an assistant coach at the University of Arkansas, was named third head coach of the Men's Basketball team. He was the first African American named as head basketball coach.

April 8-19, 2002: Dr. Lee M. E. Morin, who had earned a master’s degree from the School of Public Health in 1988, served on the crew of STS-110 Atlantis on the 13th shuttle mission to the International Space Station. During the NASA mission, Morin completed two separate spacewalks.

April 8, 2002: Norman A. Reilly, Jr., became UAB's fourth Sports Information office.

April 19, 2002: The Comprehensive Youth Violence Center was approved by the University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Michael Windle was named first director of the center.

April 29, 2002: The groundbreaking ceremony was held for the Richard C. and Annette N. Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building.

May 20, 2002: The administration building of The University of Alabama Health Services Foundation was rededicated as the John N. Whitaker Building.

June 1, 2002: Dr. Malcolm Portera, chancellor of The University of Alabama System, became interim president of UAB.

July 7, 2002: The first set of sextuplets (four boys and two girls) born in Alabama was born at University Hospital.

July 23, 2002: Dr. Carol Z. Garrison became president-elect of UAB by unanimous vote of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Garrison was once a nurse in University Hospital, obtained a master's degree in nursing from UAB in 1976, and taught in the School of Nursing until 1978.

August 7, 2002: UAB's economic impact on the local community was announced as more than $2.5 billion for the 2001 fiscal year.

August 2002: Dr. Mary G. Nash became the third Executive Director of University Hospital, the first woman and the first person with a nursing background to be named hospital director.

September 1, 2002: Dr. Carol Z. Garrison became the sixth president of UAB.

September 20, 2002: The UAB Center for Development of Functional Imaging was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Lawrence E. Mays was named as first director of the center.

September 20, 2002: Finis St. John IV and Vanessa Leonard were elected to The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. John McMahon was elected president pro-tem.

September 20, 2002: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Center for Low Vision Rehabilitation. Drs. Marsha N. Swanson and Donald C. Fletcher were named co-directors of the center.

September 20, 2002: The UAB Minority Health and Research Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Mona N. Fouad was named first director of the new center.

September 20, 2002: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Center for Biodefense and Emerging Infections. Dr. Richard J. Whitley was the center's first director.

October 1, 2002: Dr. Eli Capilouto became acting Provost.

October 25, 2002: Dr. Eric Hunter presented the thirty-ninth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Why Birmingham, Alabama?"

October 2002: Demolition began on Mortimer Jordan Hall in order to construct the Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building.

October 2002: Blazer Hall, University Hall and the Garden Apartments were demolished in order to construct a student recreation center.

November 9, 2002: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the creation of the Alabama Institute of Minimally Invasive Surgery. Dr. Ronald H. Clements was named director of the center.

November 21, 2002: Watson Brown was named as third Director of Athletics after having served as interim director since August. Brown remained as the head coach of the Football team.

November 2002: The Department of Genetics was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees as a merger of the existing departments of Human Genetics and of Genomics and Pathobiology.

2002: Ajay Kamireddi, a junior biology and philosophy major from Huntsville, Alabama, became the first UAB student to win a Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship.

January 2003: The School of Medicine’s Faculty Office Tower was completed above Parking Deck No. 4.

March 2003: The UAB Huntsville Regional Medical Campus opened a new clinic and teaching facility, the primary clinical and academic space for the University of Alabama School of Medicine Huntsville Program.

April 7, 2003: Ground was broken for UAB’s long-awaited Student Recreation Center.

April 2003: The UAB Health Sciences bookstore location on South 20th Street was closed and the bookstore was relocated to the Hill University Center.

June 2003: Dr. John F. Amos became the fourth dean of the School of Optometry.

August 1, 2003: Dr. James B. McClintock became interim dean of the UAB Graduate School.

October 28, 2003: Dr. J. Russell Lindsey presented the fortieth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “A Celebration of Family.”

September 4, 2003: In the first home football game to be broadcast nationally (on ESPN television), the Football team was defeated by Southern Mississippi 17-12. National television and a half-time performance of Birmingham native and “American Idol” Ruben Studdard drew a crowd of 44,079 to Legion Field for the game; the largest crowd ever for a UAB Blazer home game.

September 19, 2003: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Center for Heart Failure Research. Drs. Louis J. Dell'Italia and Ahsan Hussain were named co-directors of the new center.

December 31, 2003: The UAB Capital Campaign officially ended with over $388.7 million raised, the largest fundraising effort by any university in Alabama. The campaign’s original goal had been $250 million.

2003: Dr. Louis Dale was named the first vice president for Equity and Diversity, becoming the first African American named to a vice presidential office at UAB.

2003: Dr. Sadis Matalon became the first vice president for Research; he served in an acting capacity.

2003: A major addition to Volker Hall was completed on the building’s west facade.

2003: Construction began on Parking Deck No. 11 at the corner of University Boulevard and South 12th Street. A building to be constructed along with the parking deck would provide space for several campus offices.

2004: For fiscal year 2003, UAB’s economic impact on the Birmingham metropolitan area reached a record high of $2.9 billion, with an impact on the state of Alabama of $3.2 billion.

January 1, 2004: Dr. Huw F. Thomas became the seventh dean of the School of Dentistry.

March 11, 2004: The UAB Health System announced that it would manage three Montgomery hospitals operated previously under Baptist Health of Montgomery. The three facilities were the Baptist Medical Center South (454 licensed beds), Baptist Medical Center East (150 beds), and Prattville Baptist Hospital (85 beds).

April 7, 2004: Audra Smith, an assistant coach at the University of Virginia, was named head coach of the Women's Basketball team. She was the first African American female named as a head coach at UAB.

April 11, 2004: University Hospital became a completely smoke-free environment for all staff and visitors in all hospital areas, including parking facilities and outside areas in the multi-block hospital complex.

April 16, 2004: The Center for Wine and Cardiovascular Health was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Dale A. Parks and Francois M. Booyse were named as center co-directors.

June 5, 2004: William S. “Sandy” White became CEO of the UAB Research Foundation, succeeding acting director Lucy Hicks.

June 18, 2004: The South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness, which had been initiated at UAB in 2002, received formal approval of The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Donna J. Peterson was the center's first director.

July 1, 2004: Dr. Michael E. Sloane became the second director of the UAB Honors Program.

August 5, 2004: David Hoidal became the third CEO of the UAB Health System after having served as interim CEO for three months.

October 1, 2004: Dr. Robert R. Rich became the dean of the School of Medicine and vice president for Medicine. His appointment had been announced on September 13.

November 5, 2004: The Center for Computational and Structural Biology was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Jere P. Segrest was named the center’s first director.

November 5, 2004: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute and the Institute of Oral Health Research as official research centers at UAB. Dr. Michael J. Friedlander was named first director of the brain institute, and Dr. Mary B. MacDougall was later recruited as first director of the oral health institute.

November 8, 2004: Dr. Albert D. Pacifico performed the first surgery in the new surgical suites in University Hospital’s North Pavilion.

November 11, 2004: Dr. William J. Koopman presented the forty-first Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Leadership in Academic Medicine.”

December 1, 2004: Dr. Michael R. Waldrum became chief operating officer for University Hospital, with responsibility for the day-to-day operations of the hospital.

December 24, 2004: In the Sheraton Hawaii Bowl in Honolulu, Hawaii, the Football team lost to the University of Hawaii 59-40 in the first post-season bowl appearance for the UAB Blazers. The season record was 7-5.

2004: The UAB Commission on the Status of Women established with a goal of maintaining a positive, equitable environment for all women at the university.

February 4, 2005: The Skin Diseases Research Center was approved by the University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Craig A. Elmets was named first director of UAB's newest center.

May 1, 2005: The Campus Recreation Center opened.

May 12, 2005: Dr. Eli Capilouto was named Provost after having served as acting Provost since 2002.

August 1, 2005: The UAB Health System took over management of the HealthSouth Medical Center while a $33 million sale of the center in Birmingham’s Southside remained pending. The center campus included the main hospital complex, two professional office buildings, parking for over 1,400 cars, and several outlying structures.

September 16, 2005: The UAB Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center and the UAB Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease Core Center were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Ernesto R. Drelichman and Lisa Guay-Woodford were named, respectively, as directors of the new centers.

September 2005: Anne Fadiman’s The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down was used as the inaugural campus-wide discussion book.

October 1, 2005: Dr. Ray L. Watts became the sixth president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

October 20, 2005: Dr. Jay M. McDonald presented the forty-second Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Survival on the Mission to Mars: Columbus had it Easy.”

November 1, 2005: Dr. Doreen Harper became the fourth dean of the School of Nursing.

November 1, 2005: Dr. Bryan D. Noe became the dean of the UAB Graduate School.

November 2005: The University Optometric Group, a faculty practice for the School of Optometry, opened in a new location in the renovated 9th Avenue Office Building.

December 13, 2005: Athletic Director Watson Brown stepped down to resume his position as Head Football Coach. He was replaced by Richard L. Margison, UAB's vice president for Financial Affairs and Administration, who became interim Athletic Director.

December 2005: Dr. Robert M. Centor became the second Associate Dean of the University of Alabama School of Medicine Huntsville Program after having served in that capacity on an interim basis.

February 3, 2006: The UAB Center for Glial Biology in Medicine and the Center for Nanoscale Materials and Biointegration were approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Drs. Harold W. Sontheimer and Yogesh K. Vohra were named directors of the new centers.

March 1, 2006: Dr. Cynthia G. Brumfield became University Hospital’s third chief-of-staff, the first female to be named to the position.

March 25, 2006: Mike Anderson, head coach of men's basketball, left UAB when he was hired as coach at the University of Missouri. Anderson left the university after four seasons with a record of 24-7, with three consecutive trips to the NCAA tournament, and with four 20-win seasons.

March 31, 2006: UAB finalized the purchase of the HealthSouth Medical Center and renamed the facility UAB Highlands. Prior to its acquisition by HealthSouth, the facility had been named the South Highlands Hospital and had been founded in 1910 as the South Highlands Infirmary.

April 3, 2006: A dedication ceremony was held for the Richard C. and Annette N. Shelby Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Building. The 12-story building contains over 323,000 square feet of space and is located at the corner of University Boulevard and South 19th Street.

April 6, 2006: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the Mucosal HIV and Immunobiology Center. Dr. Philip D. Smith was named director of the center.

April 6, 2006: The School of Health Related Professions was renamed the School of Health Professions. Dr. Harold P. Jones remained as dean.

April 7, 2006: Mike Davis became the fourth head coach of the men's basketball team. An Alabama native and former head coach at the University of Indiana, Davis brought to UAB a 115-79 record as Indiana's head coach.

June 12, 2006: Brian Shoop became the fourth head coach of the Men's Baseball team.

July 1, 2006: Dr. Keith A. Jones became chair of the Department of Anesthesiology, the first African American to become a full-time departmental chair in the School of Medicine.

July 2006: The School of Medicine increased the incoming first-year class to 176 students.

August 2006: Hixson Hall, an on-campus residence that had opened in 1962, was closed while the future of the building was being determined by UAB administrators. Demolition of the building later began in the fall of 2007.

September 12, 2006: A formal dedication ceremony was held for the new Blazer Hall and for the Commons on the Green, UAB's new campus dining facility.

September 15, 2006: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved three new centers at UAB, the Comprehensive Diabetes Center, the Center for Pediatric-Onset Demyelinating Disease, and the UAB Comprehensive Neuroscience Center. Drs. Edward Abraham, Jayne N. Ness, and Kevin A. Roth, respectively, were named directors of the three centers.

October 9, 2006: Anthony B. Purcell became the chief of the UAB Police Department.

October 30, 2006: Dr. Jack E. Lemons presented the forty-third Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Celebration of Opportunities: Evolution of Surgical Implant Devices.”

November 1, 2006: The Kirklin Clinic Patient Resources Library opened as a partnership between The Kirklin Clinic, the UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, and the Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences. Librarians and Cancer Center staff shared work hours in the second floor library.

December 17, 2006: C. Neil Callaway, assistant coach at the University of Georgia, was named as the third head coach of the Football team.

February 2, 2007: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the UAB Center for Neurodegeneration and Experimental Therapeutics. Dr. David Standaert was named director of the center.

February 14, 2007: Brian W. Mackin, a former Blazer baseball player and an alumnus of UAB, was named as the fourth Athletics Director at UAB.

July 30, 2007: Incoming freshman in the School of Medicine began class under a newly initiated curriculum organized around organ systems and called the “Curriculum for the 21st Century.”

August 15, 2007: Dr. Jean Ann Linney became the fourth dean of the School of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

October 11, 2007: Dr. Dale J. Benos presented the forty-fourth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "Science, Publications and Society: What Have You Done For Me Lately?"

2007: Entering freshmen in the School of Dentistry began their studies under a revised “vertically integrated” curriculum, where students are exposed to clinical training almost from the start and receive instruction and mentoring from faculty and upper classmen.

January 4, 2008: Dr. Ray L. Watts, chair of neurology and president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation, became interim CEO of the UAB Health System.

February 8, 2008: The UAB Center for Urban Education was approved by the University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Deborah L. Voltz was named director of the new center.

March 1, 2008: Dr. David R. Klock became fifth dean of the School of Business.

March 10, 2008: Dr. David Winwood became CEO of the UAB Research Foundation.

March 27, 2008: UAB announced that the Women's Synchronized Swimming team would be eliminated as a varsity sport at the end of the 2009 season.

April 29, 2008: A smoke breathing statue of the UAB dragon mascot was unveiled on the concourse in front of Bartow Arena. Created by T. J. Neil of Homosassa, Fla., the three-ton statue is nine feet tall and sixteen feet long.

June 20, 2008: The Pulmonary Injury and Repair Center was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. Dr. Sadis Matalon was named first director of the new center.

June 20, 2008: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the establishment of the Diabetes Research and Training Center with Dr. W. Timothy Garvey as first director.

June 20, 2008: The UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science was approved by The University of Alabama Board of Trustees. The center had been established earlier in the year following the receipt of a $26.9 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Lisa M. Guay-Woodford was named director of the new center.

September 2008: Dr. William Ferniany became CEO of the UAB Health System, an appointment which had been announced in August.

November 6, 2008: Dr. Robert P. Kimberly presented the forty-fifth Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "And Gladly Teach."

May 9, 2009: Due to the number of graduates and to better accommodate invited guests, UAB for the first time offered two commencement ceremonies. A morning ceremony was held for the graduates of the Schools of Arts & Humanities, Education, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, and Social & Behavioral Sciences. An afternoon ceremony was held for the graduates of the Schools of Business, Dentistry, Engineering, Health Professions, Public Health, Medicine, Nursing, and Optometry.

May 2009: UAB received an anonymous gift of $5 million to be used chiefly for scholarships for women or minorities. UAB’s gift was one of at least a dozen such bequests received by academic institutions across the country. The only known similarity was that each institution had a female president.

June 26, 2009: The Alabama Commission on Higher Education approved a proposal for UAB to offer two programs on the campuses of Jefferson State Community College. The programs, which were scheduled to begin in the fall, would lead toward a bachelor’s degree in business management (at the JSCC-Shelby campus) or a bachelor’s degree in early childhood education (at the JSCC-Jefferson campus).

August 18, 2009: When classes began, UAB had the largest enrollment in the school’s 40-year history. Freshman enrollment was up 19 percent and graduate student enrollment hit its largest number ever. Student enrollment stood at 16,874, with a total enrollment of 18,047 when the advanced professional schools were included.

September 24, 2009: In honor of the fortieth anniversary of UAB, President Carol Z. Garrison and Provost Eli Capilouto hosted a university-wide convocation at the Alys Robinson Stephens Performing Arts Center as part of the inaugural University Day celebration.

October 12, 2009: Dr. Suzanne M. Michalek presented the forty-sixth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “UAB and Mucosal Immunology: Past, Present and Future.”

October 14, 2009: President Carol Z. Garrison and Provost Eli Capilouto announced plans to merge four schools into a new College of Arts and Sciences effective January 1, 2010. The new College was comprised by the Schools of Arts and Humanities, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Social and Behavioral Sciences; the School of Education will be a distinctly identified component within the College. A search to name an interim dean of the College was initiated.

November 2009: Dr. Jean Ann Linney, dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences, was named as interim dean of UAB's new College of Arts and Sciences. This appointment became effective on January 1, 2010.

December 12, 2009: For the first time, the UAB commencement ceremony was streamed live via the internet.

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January 1, 2010: Dr. Rodney W. Nowakowski became interim dean of the School of Optometry.

January 1, 2010: The College of Arts and Sciences replaced the separate Schools of Arts and Humanities, Natural Sciences and Mathematics and Social and Behavioral Sciences. Dr. Jean Ann Linney became interim dean of the new College.

January 13, 2010: On a flight to carry a survivor of the earthquake in Haiti to a Miami hospital, UAB Hospital’s Critical Care Transport (CCT) jet became the first US aircraft in five decades to make an official flight through Cuban airspace.

February 21, 2010: UAB opened the new Women and Infants Center and five babies were born in the new facility its first day. In a random drawing, one of the five was selected to receive a full, undergraduate tuition scholarship to the university from the UAB Health System.

March 4, 2010: The UAB Ethics Bowl Team won the National Intercollegiate Ethics Bowl held in Cincinnati, Ohio, in only the team’s second year in existence.

July 1, 2010: Dr. Thomas M. DiLorenzo became the first dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, an appointment that had been announced in June.

August 2010: For the fall term, total enrollment at UAB increased by almost 4 percent over last year up to 17,543. Undergraduate and freshman enrollment both rose about 3.6 percent and graduate and advanced professional student enrollment grew 4.6 percent.

September 2010: Dr. Sergio Stagno, chair of the Department of Pediatrics, became seventh president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

October 1, 2010: Dr. Ray L. Watts became Senior Vice President for Medicine and dean of the School of Medicine. Dr. Watts, who was then chair of the UAB Department of Neurology and president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation, had been selected for the position in July.

November 9, 2010: UAB’s economic impact on the Alabama economy was reported at $4.6 billion annually. UAB supports 61,025 jobs and generates $302.2 million in tax revenue to state and local governments. Further, $1 in every $25 in the state's budget is generated by UAB, and every $1 invested by the state in UAB generates $16.23 in the total state economy.

November 11, 2010: UAB announced plans to add two more sports for women. Women’s bowling will begin in the fall of 2011 and women’s sand volleyball will begin in the spring of 2012

December 1, 2010: Dr. Arthur M. Boudreaux became interim chief-of-staff of University Hospital.

December 8, 2010: Dr. Edward E. Partridge delivered the forty-seventh annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Civil War, Civil Rights and the New Moral Imperative: Leadership of a Different Color.”

January 1, 2011: Dr. Deborah L. Voltz became fifth dean of the School of Education.

January 20, 2011: UAB National Alumni Society House was officially dedicated.

March 2011: Dr. Rodney W. Nowakowski was named as the fifth dean of the School of Optometry.

March 2011: The UAB Bioethics Team was named champions of the 2011 National Bioethics Undergraduate Conference held in Durham, North Carolina. Dr. Gregory Pence was the faculty sponsor of the team.

March 2011: UAB announced the establishment of the first two endowed deanships at the university, the James C. Lee, Jr., Endowed Chair for the Dean of the School of Medicine and the Fay B. Ireland Endowed Chair for the Dean of the School of Nursing.

May 18, 2011: Dr. Linda C. Lucas, dean of the Engineering school, became interim Provost.

May 20, 2011: Dr. Michael S. Reddy was named as interim dean of the School of Dentistry, to be effective on June 6, 2011.

May 2011: Dr. Melinda M. Lalor was named as interim dean of the School of Engineering.

July 1, 2011: Dr. Donna K. Arnett became the sixth UAB faculty member elected as president of the American Heart Association. Arnett, chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health, became president in July 2012, the first epidemiologist selected for the presidency of the AHA.

August 2011: For the third consecutive year, enrollment at UAB reached a record high, with a combined enrollment of 17,575 students in the undergraduate through graduate levels. A record 67 percent of incoming freshmen lived in on-campus housing.

October 10, 2011: Dr. David B. Allison presented the forty-eighth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “The Fire of Life.”

November 2011: UAB alumnus Joshua Carpenter became the university’s second recipient of the Rhodes Scholarship award. Carpenter graduated from UAB in 2010 with a double major in accounting and economics.

December 5, 2011: Garrick McGee was introduced as the fourth head coach of the UAB football team. Formerly the offensive coordinator at the University of Arkansas, the Oklahoma native had been a quarterback at the University of Oklahoma. His hiring had been announced the day before.

December 2011: John Fields, adjunct instructor in the Department of Art and Art History and a UAB alumnus, became interim director of the UAB Visual Arts Gallery.

March 5, 2012: The Board of Trustees of The University of Alabama System selected Dr. Robert E. Witt as the sixth Chancellor of the three-campus university system. Dr. Witt had previously served as president of The University of Alabama since 2003.

March 15, 2012: Dr. Michael S. Reddy became the eighth dean of the School of Dentistry.

March 27, 2012: Jerod Haase was introduced as the fifth head coach of the Men’s Basketball team. Haase played at Kansas and had served as an assistant coach at Kansas and at North Carolina prior to coming to UAB.

April 30, 2012: Dr. Linda C. Lucas, who had served as Interim Provost since May of 2011, was named Provost of UAB.

May 2012: Dr. Louise T. Chow, a professor of biochemistry and molecular genetics, was elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences, only the second UAB faculty member to be so honored.

July 1, 2012: Dr. Donna K. Arnett became the sixth UAB faculty member to serve as president of the American Heart Association. Arnett, chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health, was the first epidemiologist selected for the presidency of the AHA.

August 20, 2012: Dr. Eric P. Jack, associate dean, was named as interim dean of the School of Business, to be effective October first.

August 21, 2012: Dr. Richard B. Marchase, vice president for Research and Economic Development, was named as interim President of UAB following the departure of President Carol Z. Garrison.

August 27, 2012: Scott E. Hanley became General Manager of WBHM-FM Radio.

September 2012: For the fourth consecutive year, UAB had a record student enrollment with 17,999 students entering the fall term. Enrollment of incoming freshmen increased 4.4 percent and a record number of students lived in UAB’s on-campus housing.

October 1, 2012: Dr. Robert E. Palazzo became interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.

October 1, 2012: Dr. James A. Bonner became the president of the University of Alabama Health Services Foundation.

October 10, 2012: Dr. Stephen Barnes presented the forty-ninth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, “Science, Collaborations, Alternatives, and the Future.”

February 8, 2013:The University of Alabama Board of Trustees selected Dr. Ray L. Watts as the seventh president of UAB. Dr. Watts, who holds an undergraduate degree from the UAB School of Engineering, had joined the UAB faculty in 2003. He later served as chair of the Department of Neurology and at his selection as president was UAB's Senior Vice President and dean of the School of Medicine.

February 8, 2013: Dr. Anupam Agarwal, director of the Division of Nephrology, was named as interim dean of the School of Medicine following the appointment of Dean Ray L. Watts as the seventh president of UAB.

March 18, 2013: The UAB Marching Blazers won the International Band Competition in Limerick, Ireland, beating out 17 other bands from the US and Europe one day after performing in the St. Patrick's Day Parade in Dublin.

April 2, 2013: Dr. Eric P. Jack became the sixth dean of the School of Business.

April 2013: UAB created an area at 850 8th Court South, near the university’s soccer field, where associates could grow their own vegetables in a program coordinated by the office of Sustainability. Initially, 65 plots were made available to students, faculty and staff and the program had a 75-person waiting list.

June 1, 2013: Dr. Robert E. Palazzo became the second dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, after having served as interim since October 2012.

2013: UAB announced plans for a campus-wide in-house bus transportation system to begin operation in 2014. The 24-hour weekday system will operate a fleet of buses on six discrete lines with an aim to have all campus locations within a five-minute walk from a scheduled bus stop. In June of 2013 the system was named Blazer Express after a campus-wide "Name the Bus" contest.

August 1, 2013: Dr. J. Iwan D. Alexander became the sixth dean of the School of Engineering. Dr. Alexander, whose selection had been announced in February, came to UAB from Case Western Reserve University.

September 13, 2013: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees approved the renaming of the UAB School of Business as the Collat School of Business in recognition of a $25 million gift of longtime supporters Charles and Patsy Collat.

September 13, 2013: For the fifth consecutive year, fall enrollment at UAB set a record. Total enrollment increased 3.6 percent, up to 18,568 students. Enrollment of freshmen also reached a record for the fifth consecutive year, and more than 69 percent of freshmen lived in on-campus housing.

September 21, 2013: The Alys Stephens Performing Arts center hosted the world premiere of A More Convenient Season, a multi-media orchestral work composed by Yotam Haber and commissioned by Tom Blount to commemorate the Civil Rights Movement in Birmingham and the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church on September 15, 1963.

October 15, 2013: Dr. Selwyn M. Vickers became Senior Vice President for Medicine and dean of the School of Medicine.  Dr. Vickers, a native of Demopolis, Alabama, and a former member of the UAB surgery faculty, was chair of surgery at the University of Minnesota when his appointment was announced in August.

October 25, 2013: UAB announced the largest philanthropic campaign in university history, The Campaign for UAB: Give Something, Change Everything, with a goal of raising $1 billion by the end of 2018.

November 13, 2013: Dr. John F. Kearney presented the fiftieth annual Distinguished Faculty Lecture, "How One Year Turned Into Forty Years at UAB."

January 3, 2014: UAB Campus Ride and Campus Escort services were discontinued.

January 6, 2014: The Blazer Express Transit System, UAB's new campus-wide bus and shuttle system, launched with six routes available at no cost to UAB students, staff, and authorized campus visitors.

January 15, 2014: The Abroms-Engel Institute for the Visual Arts (AEIVA) was formally dedicated.  Named for UAB benefactors Hal and Judy Abroms and Marvin and Ruth Engel, the striking new facility houses the university's art galleries, administrative and faculty offices, and the Department of Art and Art History.  AEIVA was opened to the public on the following day.

January 22, 2014: In a press conference in Bartow Arena, Bill Clark was introduced as the fifth head coach of the Blazer Football team. Clark was hired away from Jacksonville State University, where he led the team to a record season of 11-4 and the NCAA Division I playoffs for the first time in school history.

April 2014: John M. Meador, Jr., was named as the inaugural dean of UAB Libraries. Meador, who was the dean of the library at SUNY Binghamton, will become the university's first library dean on August fifth.

May 22, 2014: UAB Medicine Urgent Care was opened at 125 South 20th Street, on the street level of the Cityville apartment complex adjacent to Birmingham's Railroad Park. The walk-in clinic will be open seven days a week for non-life-threatening illnesses.

June 1, 2014: Dr. Kelly K. Nichols, from the University of Houston, became the sixth dean of the School of Optometry. Her appointment had been announced in February.

June 1, 2014: Dr. J. Fred Olive, a long time member of the library faculty, became interim director of the Mervyn Sterne Library upon the retirement of Dr. Jerry W. Stephens.

June 3, 2014: Dr. Shannon Blanton was named as the inaugural dean of the UAB Honors College. Dr. Blanton comes to UAB from the University of Memphis.

 


Chronology maintained by Tim L. Pennycuff and last updated 18 June 2014.

Copyright: The University of Alabama Board of Trustees.



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