Cutting-edge research
Exploring glaucoma via ocular biomechanics
Convenient clinic locations
The only ophthalmology residency in Alabama
Based in the renowned UAB Callahan Eye Hospital
  • UAB identifies functional biomarker for age-related macular degeneration

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    Adults whose eyes are slow to adjust to the dark have a greater risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, according to new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published online in Ophthalmology. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in older adults in the United States.

  • Downs receives a second R01 grant to study glaucoma

    Downs grant

    J. Crawford Downs, Ph.D., has received a four-year, $1.88 million grant from the National Eye Institute to further explore the underlying mechanisms of glaucoma and bring the relationship between age, intraocular pressure and glaucoma development into focus. This award is in addition to a three-year, $1.23 million grant Downs received in May 2015 to investigate the role of intraocular pressure fluctuations in glaucoma.

  • Eye site offers new insight on age-related macular degeneration

    ProjectMacula Curcio

    Over the past 14 years, Christine A. Curcio, Ph.D., a professor in the UAB School of Medicine’s Department of Ophthalmology, has collected images from hundreds of donor eyes in her search for the basic mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration. AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss and legal blindness in Americans age 60 or older, affecting up to 15 million people in the United States today and almost 200 million people worldwide by 2020. As the population ages, those numbers will only increase. AMD occurs when the central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates. But the exact cause is unknown, and new treatments are desperately needed.

  • UAB study looks to improve medication adherence in African-American glaucoma patients

    glaucomadevice v2

    Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are hoping a telemedicine-based health promotion intervention can improve medication adherence rates among older African-Americans with glaucoma. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness among African-Americans, who are more than three times more likely to develop glaucoma than are Caucasians.