Cutting-edge research
Exploring glaucoma via ocular biomechanics
Convenient clinic locations
The only ophthalmology residency in Alabama
Based in the renowned UAB Callahan Eye Hospital
  • UAB identifies functional biomarker for age-related macular degeneration

    owsley da

    Adults whose eyes are slow to adjust to the dark have a greater risk of developing age-related macular degeneration, according to new findings from the University of Alabama at Birmingham published online in Ophthalmology. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in older adults in the United States.

  • Downs receives a second R01 grant to study glaucoma

    Downs grant

    J. Crawford Downs, Ph.D., has received a four-year, $1.88 million grant from the National Eye Institute to further explore the underlying mechanisms of glaucoma and bring the relationship between age, intraocular pressure and glaucoma development into focus. This award is in addition to a three-year, $1.23 million grant Downs received in May 2015 to investigate the role of intraocular pressure fluctuations in glaucoma.

  • Eye site offers new insight on age-related macular degeneration

    ProjectMacula Curcio

    Over the past 14 years, Christine A. Curcio, Ph.D., a professor in the UAB School of Medicine’s Department of Ophthalmology, has collected images from hundreds of donor eyes in her search for the basic mechanisms underlying age-related macular degeneration. AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss and legal blindness in Americans age 60 or older, affecting up to 15 million people in the United States today and almost 200 million people worldwide by 2020. As the population ages, those numbers will only increase. AMD occurs when the central portion of the retina, known as the macula, deteriorates. But the exact cause is unknown, and new treatments are desperately needed.

  • UAB study looks to improve medication adherence in African-American glaucoma patients

    glaucomadevice v2

    Researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are hoping a telemedicine-based health promotion intervention can improve medication adherence rates among older African-Americans with glaucoma. Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness among African-Americans, who are more than three times more likely to develop glaucoma than are Caucasians.

  • UAB Renews Vision for Renowned Sculptor Frank Fleming

    flemingfeature web

    Vision is precious to all of us, but for people who are especially oriented toward visual stimulus, or whose livelihood is dependent upon exceptional visual acuity, healthy vision has perhaps a deeper significance. UAB Medicine patient and Birmingham artist Frank Fleming can attest to that.

  • End-of-Summer and Back-to-School Eye Safety

    childreneyecare

    August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month, which emphasizes healthy vision for children by encouraging eye examinations to detect vision problems, and by preventing eye injuries at home and at school.

  • A lifetime of insights gained from a few hours without sight

    For 23 diners in Birmingham last Thursday, Dinner in the Dark was a real eye-opening experience, especially since the diners were blindfolded. The event gave sighted individuals some understanding of what it means to be visually impaired.

  • UAB researcher awarded $1.23 million grant for glaucoma research

    Downs newwebJ. Crawford Downs, Ph.D., vice chair of Research in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Ophthalmology, was awarded a three-year, $1.23 million grant from the National Eye Institute to explore intraocular pressure fluctuation as it relates to the development and progression of glaucoma, a potentially blinding disease that affects more than 2.2 million Americans.

  • Colorful Agam sculpture returns to Callahan Eye Hospital

    by Bob Shepard

    “Complex Vision” has returned to its place on the side of the Callahan Eye Hospital at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The kinetic sculpture, originally installed in 1976, was taken down for restoration last April. The sculpture was created by famed artist Yaacov Agam, often called the father of kinetic art.

    “Alston Callahan, the founder of the hospital and the primary force behind acquiring ‘Complex Vision,’ had a passion for art, and a passion to help people with eye disease,” said Brian Spraberry, CEO of Callahan Eye Hospital. “He wanted to give them an experience that they could appreciate.”

  • J. Waid Blackstone, M.D., joins faculty

    Blackstone webportrait

    J. Waid Blackstone, M.D., joins the UAB Department of Ophthalmology as an assistant professor. Dr. Blackstone, an alumnus of the UAB Ophthalmology residency program, has more than ten years experience as an eye care specialist. Dr. Blackstone is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Medical Association, the Alabama Academy of Ophthalmology and the Medical Association of the State of Alabama.

  • As glaucoma cases soar, researchers focus on solutions

    Lindsay Rhodes

    Ernest Murry saw glaucoma steal his mother’s vision, just as it had robbed sight from many other family members. There was a time when it seemed the same might happen to him. “When I went outside to walk, I would have to pat in front of me to keep from falling,” he says.

  • UAB Seeks Answers to Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Zhang AMD

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) causes central vision loss in millions of Americans, interfering with everyday tasks such as driving, reading, and recognizing faces.

  • What you need to know about pediatric glaucoma

    by Bob Shepard

    One evening, five years ago, Brittni Powell did what a lot of young mothers do and gazed into her 2-month-old son’s eyes. What she saw had Brittni and her husband Byron heading immediately to a Montgomery-area hospital emergency department.

    “We looked into his eyes and they had this gray, glazy tone to them,” Powell recalled. “We knew that wasn’t right.”

  • Diabetic eye screenings via telemedicine show value for underserved communities

    DR Screening

    by Bob Shepard

    Eye screenings of people with diabetes in underserved communities revealed that one in five had early stage diabetic retinopathy, according to a new study by a research consortium including investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    The findings, published today in JAMA Ophthalmology, also indicated that nearly half of the mostly minority populations screened had additional vision conditions such as glaucoma or cataract. The study, which used a telemedicine screening approach, also provided early validation of the efficacy of telemedicine in reaching underserved populations.

  • Complex contact lenses from UAB Ophthalmology keep disabled vet rolling

    by Bob Shepard

    Jeff Henson has been riding bikes for years. In 2012, he rode a bike coast to coast across the United States. Before that, the Army veteran did a long bike ride in France, and several in the American Northwest, always on a tandem bike and always from the back seat. He was not allowed to ride on the front seat, the steering seat.

    Jeff Henson was legally blind during those rides.

    Henson, a native of Heflin, Alabama, who served as a demolition specialist in the Army for nine years, developed vision issues caused by arthritis and inflammation that first struck his right eye in 2000.

  • A Bold Vision

    PresidentWatts-TorreyDeKeyser-DrHofland-DrGirkinA unique and dynamic philanthropic collaboration has resulted in a gift commitment to establish the Research to Prevent Blindness/Susan and Dowd Ritter Endowed Chair in Ophthalmology Research in the UAB Department of Ophthalmology. The $3.75-million endowment, one of the largest in UAB history, will enable the department to recruit a world-class scientist to join its existing roster of international experts in the study of blinding diseases like age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma.

  • Leave fireworks to the pros, UAB eye doctors say

    Fourth of July 2013: Family members were shooting fireworks in the backyard of Dianne Peterson’s home in Vincent, Alabama, as she walked out of the house.

    “As I stepped out the back door, they were saying a firework went off; but they didn’t know which way it went,” Peterson said. “Then it hit my eye.”

    The damage to her left eye was severe. Peterson suffered a full laceration of the cornea along with bleeding and debris in the back of the eye and damage to the iris. She had a cataract caused by the trauma of the bottle rocket’s impact.

  • UAB pilot program brings glaucoma screenings closer to home


    By Bob Shepard

    Glaucoma is a silent disease. It does not hurt, symptoms are slow to develop, and most people do not notice any loss of vision until it is too late. A project by ophthalmologists at the University of Alabama at Birmingham will examine whether a partnership with community-based optometrists will improve detection and treatment of glaucoma, especially for high-risk populations.

    Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, the cable that connects the eye to the brain. The nerve breaks down in some people, usually older adults, causing irreparable vision loss.

  • A ticket to ride: UAB program opens doors to drivers who are sight-impaired


    By Bob Shepard

    To Dustin Jones, the bioptic driving program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham provides one very important benefit: freedom. Jones, a 24-year-old recent UAB graduate who works in information technology, is a typical young professional.

    But he has a congenital eye disease called optic atrophy, which had prevented him from getting a driver's license at age 16.