Career planning is more than just finding a job; it is a multi-phased process that involves steps to be taken during your entire time at UAB. The following plan lays out these steps by class year, but please realize the steps could also be laid out in progressive phases, regardless of your classification. Begin these phases as early as possible to ensure your career/job goals are met.


Phase I or Freshman: Assess & Explore

Register with Career & Professional Development Services (CPDS) on DragonTrail Jobs
Take career inventories (will be required during your FYE class)
  ° Explore majors (includes all UAB majors)
  ° Explore suggested career areas that match your Inventory results
Learn UAB academic requirements behind each major you've chosen
Schedule a follow up meeting with your academic advisor to discuss findings on majors and related occupations
Begin exploring various occupations aligned with your interests, skills, and values
Other resources for exploration include the following:
  ° Occupational Outlook Handbook
  ° What Can I Do With A Major In...
  ° UAB's Sterne Library online resources
Talk with faculty, alumni, advisors and professionals in the field for further occupational information
Explore and join student and professional organizations
Start a journal or portfolio (clubs, activities, events, etc.) reflecting on experiences
Attend UAB career fairs, seminars, and events
Attend CPD part-time job fair
Make an appointment with a career counselor to discuss next steps

Phase II or Sophomore: Research & Prepare

Revisit all steps for freshmen as they apply to sophomores
Reflect on and adjust previous career/academic plan based on experiences & knowledge
Discuss with your academic advisor how your academic plan integrates with your career goal
Register for ECG 300, "Strategies for Effective Career Development"
Make an appointment with your career counselor to discuss career goals and appropriate experiential learning opportunities
Continue involvement in student organizations, community, civic and/or service leqarning opportunities
Develop your resume and upload it into DragonTrail Jobs
Begin a search for summer jobs/internships/co-ops (experiential learning opportunities)
Schedule a mock interview with CPD
Research requirements for graduate/professional school and begin studying for admission
Attend UAB's fall and/or spring career fairs

Phase III or Junior: Validate & Experience

Revisit all steps above as they apply to juniors
Update your resume in DragonTrail Jobs
Reflect on and adjust previous career/academic plan
Consult with your academic advisor to confirm degree requirements
Assume leadership roles in student organizations
Continue developing skills and relationships to increase your employability
Research careers thoroughly to target job options and career areas within the major that fit your career goals
Use community business forums and professional organizations for networking and information gathering
Attend all career seminars and events, some of which include the following:
  ° Resume Writing
  ° Interview Skills/Preparation
  ° Job Search Strategies
  ° Skills Employers Value
  ° Business Major Options
  ° Special programs-panels, etc.
Attend UAB's fall and spring career fairs
Begin application process fro graduate/professional school and take exams
Develop your target list of employers and begin outreach
Talk with supervisors, faculty, and key leaders about serving as references, providing them with a copy of your resume

Phase IV or Senior: Implement & Succeed

Revisit all steps above as they apply to seniors
Update your resume in DragonTrail Jobs
Reflect on career/academic plan
Meet with a career counselor to have all job search materials reviewed: positioning statement, cover letters, resumes, target lists, job search plan
Identify on- and off-campus interview opportunities
Schedule mock interview(s) to improve interview skills
Sign up for on-campus interviews through DragonTrail Jobs
Apply for jobs or entrance into graduate/professional schools
Gather information on salaries and relocating
Attend career fairs if needed
Cultivate job and graduate school offers and negotiate for the optimal fit
Continue to build and keep in touch with your network & references
Update or complete journal/portfolio entries
Contact UAB CPD to advise of employment

UAB News

  • Grants available for community health projects
    UAB’s Community Health Innovation Awards available to fund local projects aimed at community health issues.

    Grants ranging from $5,000 to $25,000 are available from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Community Health Innovation Awards, part of the One Great Community program. The awards will be given to local individuals and organizations that have good ideas for solving community health issues.

    The Community Health Innovation Awards’ annual grant competition is a way for participants to think boldly and creatively about solutions to health challenges communities face. The awards are a way for UAB, local leaders and area communities to share resources and expertise.  

    One Great Communityis the community engagement component ofUAB’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science. Its goal is to connect basic science and clinical researchers with the multiple communities in the state and region. This collaboration will ensure that research efforts respond to and reflect the needs of the community through an active process of community involvement, dialogue and mutual understanding.  

    All applicants for a 2015 CHIA grant must attend an innovation workshop Saturday, Sept. 19. Click here for registration information for the workshop.

    Draft proposals will be due Monday, Oct. 19, by 5 p.m., and final proposals will be due Monday, Nov. 16 by 5 p.m.

    For more information, please contact the CHIA Project Team at: chiateam2015@gmail.com.

  • Songs for Sight holds fun fair for children and teens with low vision
    Children and teens with low vision can enjoy a special event at McWane Center sponsored by Songs for Sight.

    Songs for Sight, an organization benefiting low-vision and eye research, will host an event for children and teens with low vision at Birmingham’s McWane Center on Saturday, Sept. 12. The event will feature structured learning opportunities and a resource fair, along with a picnic supper, IMAX movie and McWane Center’s adventure exhibits.

    Songs for Sight was created to raise awareness and funds for the UAB Center for Low Vision Rehabilitation. The organization was started by Alie B. Gorrie, a patient of the center, and since its inception in 2008 Songs for Sight has raised $1 million. In addition to youth support-group activities, Songs for Sight helps the center provide eligible patients with electronic video magnification devices and orientation and mobility services, as well as funding for low-vision research. 

    The resource fair will introduce attendees to organizations that provide services to those with low vision, including Sight Savers America, the Vocational Rehabilitation service of the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services, Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, and Alabama Disabilities Advocacy program.

    Low vision is a loss of eyesight that makes everyday tasks difficult. A person with low vision may find it difficult or impossible to accomplish activities such as reading, writing, shopping, watching television, driving a car or recognizing faces.

    The free event runs from 2:15-8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 12, at McWane Center, 200 19th Street North, Birmingham. Interested attendees must RSVP to Lisa Forte, 205-488-0788 or lowvision@UAB.edu.

  • UAB’s Oh receives prestigious lifetime award from AANEM
    Oh honored with lifetime award from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    Shin J. Oh, M.D., professor in the Department of Neurology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, will receive a lifetime achievement award from the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine. The award recognizes the breadth and depth of his contributions to the electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular fields.

    “Dr. Oh is internationally recognized as a pioneer in electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular medicine, and has contributed significantly to our clinical diagnosis and treatments in the field over the last four decades,” said Eroboghene E. Ubogu, M.D., professor of neurology and neurobiology and director of the UAB Division of Neuromuscular Diseases. “His legacy at UAB is unquestionable, and he is richly deserving of the 2015 AANEM Lifetime Achievement Award, which formally recognizes his career long excellence in patient care, education and research.”

    Oh obtained his medical degree from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, followed by residency in neurology at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. In 1970, he joined the faculty of the UAB School of Medicine, becoming chief of Neurology at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, as well as the director of the electromyography and evoked potential laboratory, and director of the Muscle and Nerve Histopathology Laboratory, titles he would hold for the next 40 years — one of the longest such tenures in the history of American medicine. 

    “It is humbling to receive the highest honor given by the AANEM — the one professional organization I have treasured most throughout my career,” said Oh. “I can proudly show this to my grandchildren, telling them that their grandpa has played a small but significant role in the development of electrodiagnostic medicine.”

    Oh has served in many capacities for the AANEM, including chairing numerous committees, courses and workshops over the last four decades. Through his continuous involvement with the AANEM, he has broadened knowledge of electrodiagnostic and neuromuscular medicine by identifying unresolved clinical and research issues, designing and performing research, and publishing conclusions. 

    A prolific author, he has produced 230 articles, 28 books and book chapters, and 237 abstracts. He is an exceptional educational writer with a particular gift for clearly and directly explaining even the most complex of physiological and histological methods. He has also written numerous texts that have become classics of the field.

More Items

UAB Career & Professional Development Twitter