Confidential, one-on-one career counseling is available to all UAB postdocs and Graduate Biomedical Science Students. With individualized career counseling, we can help you:

  • Clarify and define your career goals
  • Research and explore career options
  • Identify your strengths and weakness
  • Implement a plan for skills development
  • Develop an effective self-marketing campaign, including job search materials (i.e., CV, resume, cover letter)
  • Prepare for upcoming interviews (academic and industry)

Career Services

Career and Professional Development Services offers a varietyof programs, services and resources to prepare you to enter the competitive market. Collaborate with us and gain the knowledge and confidence to make wise career decisions and achieve career success.

Career Consulting

Confidential career consultants are available by appointment to help address individual and group needs.

The process helps you:

•    Increase awareness of self and of suitable occupations and trends
•    Integrate the two areas to make meaningful career decisions
•    Discuss ways to gain relevant experience depending on your career goal
•    Develop a career and academic plan
•    Perfect your career story, as you integrate experiences into your resume and interviews

Assessments

Assessments help you identify suitable matches and options based on your responses. To learn more about assessments, visit uab.edu/phdcareers Explore Tab.

Experiential Education

Gaining experience increases your value to employers.It demonstrates your interest and commitment to the career field and gets your foot in the door with increased abilities, contacts, and/or understanding of the career’s relevance in the organization.

Job Listings (DragonTrail)

Postings of full-time and part-time job openings (both on-campus and off), internships, cooperative education and other professional opportunities are available through DragonTrail, our online career management site.

Career Fairs

The Job and Internship Fair and the Graduate and Professional Schools Fair in the fall, along with fairs dedicated to the individual schools in the spring, provide valuable opportunities for networking, information gathering, part-time and full-time employment, and intern and co-opemployment. For dates and more information, check the calendar of events on uab.edu/phdcarrers and uab.edu/careerservices.

Career Workshops/Presentations

From “Resume Writing” to “How To Dress For An Interview,” there are a variety of workshop/ presentation topics offered to help you with their career goals. See the events calendar at uab.edu/careerservices for upcoming workshops/ presentations. Student groups and faculty may request a career presentation by completing the online request form at uab.edu/careerservices.

To schedule an appointment, please contact Jami Armbrester at JamiA@uab.edu or the UAB Office of Career and Professional Development Services, 205-934-4324 or email careerservices@uab.edu.

UAB Research News

  • Crowdsourcing science: How Amazon’s Mechanical Turk is becoming a research tool
    A growing number of researchers, from computer scientists to philosophers, are taking an interest in the "artificial artificial intelligence" offered by Amazon's microwork platform.

    Written by Matt Windsor

    This spring, Chris Callison-Burch, Ph.D., was in town to share an unusual approach to machine learning. This is one of the hottest topics in computer science: It is behind everything from Google’s self-driving cars to Apple’s Siri personal assistant.

    Callison-Burch, an assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania, is building a system that can automatically translate foreign languages into English — especially obscure dialects (from an American point of view) that can be of great interest to national security. He was in Birmingham at the invitation of Steven Bethard, Ph.D., a machine learning researcher and assistant professor in the UAB College of Arts and Sciences Department of Computer and Information Sciences.

    In order to teach a computer to do something, Callison-Burch explained, you need to give it examples. Lots of examples. For a French-English translation, there are millions of sample texts available on the Internet. For Urdu, not so much.

    Crowdsourced corpus

    One way around this problem would be to pay professional translation services thousands of dollars to create the “corpus” of words you would need to train a computer to translate Urdu automatically. Callison-Burch has pioneered another approach: He paid some random folks on the Internet a few bucks at a time to do the work instead.

    Callison-Burch is one of a growing number of researchers using Amazon Mechanical Turk, a service of the giant Internet company that bills itself as a “marketplace for work.” Mechanical Turk, or MTurk, as it is known, “has almost become synonymous with crowdsourcing,” Callison-Burch said. Anyone in need of help with a “human intelligence task” (Amazon’s term) can post a job description, and the “reward” they are willing to pay. One recent afternoon, some of the 255,902 tasks available on MTurk included tagging photos on Instagram (4 cents per picture), typing out the text visible in distorted images (1 cent per image) and rating test questions for a biology exam for a researcher at Michigan State University (a penny per question — this is a popular price point).

    Callison-Burch started out by giving Turkers and professional translators the same tasks. He encountered some trouble at first — respondents copying and pasting their assigned sentences into Google Translate, for example. “Quality control is a major challenge,” Callison-Burch said. “It is important to design tasks to be simple and easy to understand.”

    In order to teach a computer to do something, you need to give it examples. Lots of examples.
    That’s where Mechanical Turk can shine.

    So he tweaked his assignments to filter out people who weren’t really native speakers, and added in some clever quality control mechanisms, such as getting additional Turkers to pick the best translations out of multiple versions of the same sentence. Callison-Burch was able to get remarkably close to the professional quality, for “approximately an order of magnitude cheaper than the cost of professional translation,” he said.

    Turk-powered translation could be particularly helpful in translating regional Arabic dialects, Callison-Burch noted. “Because standard machine translation systems are trained on written text, they don’t handle spoken language well,” he said. In a recent study, Callison-Burch and his collaborators found that “comments on Arabic newspaper websites were written in dialect forms about 50 percent of the time.” A machine learning system trained in these dialects could offer vital clues about where a writer is from in the Middle East, for example, or about “his or her informal relationship with an interlocutor based on word choice.”

    Applications from obesity to philosophy

    MTurk’s brand of “artificial artificial intelligence” (Amazon’s Turk tagline) could also be applied to other machine learning research at UAB, notes Steven Bethard. “Chris’ work is fascinating,” with applications from medicine to the social sciences, Bethard said.

    UAB researchers are already putting MTurk to use. Andrew Brown, Ph.D., a research scientist in the Office of Energetics in the School of Public Health, has tested Turkers’ ability to categorize biomedical research studies. “We like to do some creative looks at what’s been published and how,” Brown said. For arecent paper, Brown and colleagues were interested in systematically evaluating nutrition-obesity studies. They wanted to find out whether studies with results that coincide with popular opinion are more likely to draw attention in the scientific community than studies that contradict the conventional wisdom. (They used citations as a proxy for the scientific community’s opinion of a paper.)  

    The first step was to identify all the studies of interest. But “the problem is, there are 25 million papers in PubMed, and sometimes the keywords don’t work very well,” Brown said. “It helps to have a human set of eyes take a look at it.” Instead of giving Ph.D.-level scientists the job, the researchers turned to MTurk. The Turkers successfully evaluated abstracts to identify appropriate studies and categorize the studied foods, then gathered citation counts for the studies in Google Scholar. (There was no significant link between public and scientific opinion when it came to the papers.)

    “We found it to be useful,” Brown said. “Expecting a perfect rating or an exhaustive rating from microworkers is probably a little premature, but on the other hand even trained scientists make mistakes.” Brown plans to use crowdsourcing for future studies. “This is just one more tool to add to our research toolbox,” he said.

    Josh May, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the UAB College of Arts and Sciences Department of Philosophy, has been using MTurk for several years — asking Turkers to solve thorny moral dilemmas. “I present participants with hypothetical scenarios and ask them to provide their opinion about them — ‘Did the person act wrongly?’” May said. “Then I see whether responses change when the scenarios are slightly different, e.g., when a harm is brought about actively versus passively, or as a means to a goal versus a side effect. Statistical analysis can reveal whether the differences are significant — providing evidence about whether the slight changes to the scenarios make a real difference in everyday moral reasoning.”

    “Expecting a perfect rating or an exhaustive rating from microworkers is probably a little premature, but on the other hand even trained scientists make mistakes…. This is just one more tool to add to our research toolbox.” —Andrew Brown, Ph.D.

    Social justice and microwork

    May, Brown and Callison-Burch share an interest in social justice for Turkers as well. “The main ethical issue with MTurk is exploitation,” May said. “The going rate is often around a quarter for a few minutes of work, which typically adds up to less than the federal minimum wage, even when working quickly. This apparently isn’t illegal given certain loopholes, but that doesn’t make it moral. Just because someone will work for pennies doesn’t mean we should withhold a living wage.”

    May’s solution for his own research “is to estimate the time it will take most workers to complete the task and then pay them enough so that the rate would amount to at least minimum wage.” Brown takes a similar approach — and when the Turkers work more slowly than expected, which drives down their overall wage, “there are bonus systems in place where you can give them something extra,” he said.

    Callison-Burch is using his programming skills to help Turkers earn fair wages. He has created a free browser extension (available at crowd-workers.com) that identifies high-paying jobs and makes it easier to identify job posters who have a large number of complaints.

    Crowdsourcing operations such as MTurk represent an untapped resource for scientists of all stripes, Callison-Burch concluded. “Individual researchers now have access to their own data production companies,” he said. “Now we can get the data we need to solve problems.”

  • NIH awards nearly $34 million to UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science
    This renewing of UAB’s prestigious Center for Translational Science Award will bolster research and workforce development at UAB and throughout its regional partner network in the Southeast.

    Written by Christina Crowe

    The National Institutes of Health has awarded the University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Clinical and Translational Science $33.59 million over four years to continue the center’s programs advancing translational research.

    Since its initial funding in 2008 through Alabama’s only Center for Translational Science Award to work toward innovative discoveries for better health, the UAB CCTS has nurtured UAB research, accelerating the process of translating laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, training a new generation of clinical and translational researchers, and engaging communities in clinical research efforts.

    The CCTS will continue to advance its mission to accelerate the delivery of new drugs, methodologies and practices to patients at UAB and throughout a partner network of 11 institutions in the Southeast.

    “We are excited by the capacity to continue to enhance our institution’s and our region’s innovative research and medical care,” said Robert Kimberly, M.D., UAB CCTS director. “Through internal and external partnerships, as well as a robust clinical environment and cutting-edge informatics and clinical trial resources, we look forward to working with our patients over the course of their lifespan.”

    Congress launched the CTSA program in 2006, which is overseen by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

    The amount of this award, more than double its previous funding awarded in 2008 and one of the largest at UAB, reflects an unmatched enthusiasm for the CCTS and its affiliated programs. It includes funding for 10 annual pre-doctoral training awards, 10 summer training awards, and eight career development awards for senior postdoctoral fellows or faculty-level candidates.

    “Our training programs continue to foster a culture of responsible, ethical practice among students, faculty and clinicians conducting human subjects research,” Kimberly said. “The NIH’s support of our expansive partner network, encompassing 11 regional academic and medical institutions throughout Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi, will allow us to further grow our scope of practices and research resources as we look to tackle health disparities in the Southeast.”

    Through One Great Community, the CCTS’ community engagement enterprise, and the Community Health Innovation Awards, the CCTS engages Greater Birmingham­­-area residents in innovative programs designed by community members to improve their neighborhoods.

    “UAB is fully committed to the goals of the CCTS and to its continued development as a hub for clinical and translational research in the Southeast,” said UAB President Ray L. Watts. “This significant renewal speaks to the tremendous work and vision of our CCTS leadership and team, as well as our clinical infrastructure, scientific strengths, informatics expertise, training programs, and biostatistical and research design assistance.

    “The CCTS touches researchers in all UAB schools and across the partner network, and we are thrilled that this important work will continue with the confidence and support of the NIH.”

    Click to enlargeState and regional impact

    “The growth of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at UAB will foster economic development in the state and throughout the region,” said Senator Richard Shelby. “With a history of providing optimal clinical care and innovation in human health, UAB’s receipt of this prestigious award enables the continued development of the workforce that is necessary to meet the needs of future research advancement.”

    Alabama Governor Robert Bentley, himself a physician, voiced his appreciation for the CCTS’ initiatives. “The center has been highly effective in providing assistance in the state’s efforts to eliminate the health disparities seen throughout our region,” Bentley said. “Whether across the life course or in underserved groups disproportionately affected by cancer, stroke, heart conditions and other diseases prevalent in our state, the center has been exemplary in reaching out to our citizens.”

    UAB Vice President, Research and Economic Development Richard Marchase, Ph.D., says he is particularly pleased that the CCTS is building on UAB’s history of serving populations burdened by health disparities through its partnerships with other state and regional institutions committed to advancing health through translational research. “It is through this culture of commitment and collaboration,” he said, “that we have become a national leader in biomedical research.”

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