Modern Healthcare GraphicIn crafting Modern Healthcare’s cover story “Racism still a problem in healthcare’s C-suite”, reporter Shelby Livingston spent almost two hours speaking with a diverse group of students from the UAB School of Health ProfessionsExecutive Master of Science in Health Administration program.

The conversation between Livingston and the students who are working as clinicians and leaders in health care from around the country was open and lively, but most of all – it was honest. The students spoke without fear about their personal experiences, in part because they have spent time together in UAB’s cohort model of executive graduate education in health administration and have been learning about leadership together.

“Diversity and inclusion – in particular, assessing our biases and having difficult, often uncomfortable conversations about topics such as race are essential for leaders in health care today,” said Christy Harris Lemak, Ph.D., chair of the Department of Health Services Administration and instructor for the leadership course the students were taking when the Modern Healthcare reporter visited. “This year, the conversation was particularly emotional - for the students of color and other students who realized for the first time the barriers some of their classmates face every day.”

bill featheringillWilliam W. Featheringill, a key contributor to Birmingham’s ascent as an internationally recognized center for health care, has been honored by one of his former companies with a UAB scholarship in his name.

The William W. Featheringill Scholarship in Health Informatics, established by his daughter Elizabeth Pharo, was endowed by SuccessEHS to honor Featheringill’s legacy as a visionary in health informatics.The endowment will support students in the UAB School of Health ProfessionsMaster of Science in Health Informatics program.

“My dad and I always thought it was unreal to have a school in Birmingham with the perfect graduates for our business and for years we relied on the UAB MSHI program graduates to fill positions with highly trained people that could help us be first to market with new health IT products,” said Elizabeth Pharo, daughter of William Featheringill and chair of Momentum Telecom. “I knew he would want to give back to the place that provided us people like Tiffani Collins – who is the solutions director at PointClear Solutions – and so many others that were perfect for the support we needed and who were a match for our company mission.”

Neeysa BiddleNeeysa Biddle is the first female
to endow an HSA scholarship
Neeysa Biddle, longtime healthcare leader of Ascension and St. Vincent’s Health Services, becomes the first female to endow a scholarship in the UAB School of Health ProfessionsDepartment of Health Services Administration with the establishment of the Neeysa Davis Biddle Endowed Scholarship in Health Administration.

Biddle is a double alumna having earned a B.S. in Allied Health (currently Health Care Management) and an M.S. in Health Administration (MSHA Class 26).

“I have been incredibly fortunate throughout my career to have worked for really great organizations, and one reason for that was the foundation of quality knowledge to navigate and succeed in the healthcare industry that I received at UAB,” said Biddle. “I am delighted to give back to the programs that helped me, and even more so, I feel strongly about helping future generations of health administration students.”

Biddle is a member of the UAB School of Health Professions “Fab 40 Alumni” which recognized the School’s Top 40 alumni in conjunction with the School’s 40th anniversary in 2011. And is an ex-officio member of the SHP Dean’s Advisory Board. She has regularly earned placement in the Birmingham Business Journal’s “Who’s Who in Health Care” list as well as their “Most Influential Executives List.” She previously was also honored as a “Woman of Distinction” by the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama.

Beasley Beyond the HKen Beasley at "Beyond the H"Ken E. Beasley, FACHE, an alumnus of the UAB School of Health ProfessionsMaster of Science in Health Administration program, has established the Beasley-Hall Endowed Scholarship in Health Administration. The scholarship, which honors Beasley’s family, will support students in the MSHA Residential program.

The scholarship is named Beasley-Hall to honor his entire family. His mother, Mary Lowrey Hall and his stepfather William E. Hall, as well as his father C.D. Beasley, Jr.

“My parents and grandparents did not have the benefit of college education and most did not have envious careers, yet they were unknowingly viewed as being among the most successful individuals in our community because of both their work ethic and the things they did for others,” said Beasley, MSHA Class 19. “They lived an understated life quietly espousing the values of hard-work, selflessness and often anonymous service to others, and integrity. The principles that define the Beasley-Hall family have led me to give back through the creation of this scholarship.”

InnoHack Team 01Opioid overdoses killed more than 40,000 Americans in 2016 – more than five times the number who died in 1999. InnoHack 2018 chose the opioid crisis as the biggest healthcare crisis facing Alabama and assigned the 80 competing professionals and students with the task to “hack” for 24 hours and find solutions to the opioid crisis in Jefferson County.

The 80 competitors were randomly divided into sixteen teams and spent January 19 – 20, 2018, at Innovation Depot developing solutions that were pitched to experts in the field. The best ideas survived a preliminary round of judging and then faced off in the finals.

The top three teams earned prize money and their ideas are being considered for implementation by healthcare organizations across Jefferson County, with hope that parts of the team’s ideas can be implemented.