On October 1, 2013 the UAB Research Foundation became a part of the UAB Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (IIE). The IIE was approved by the UAB Board of Trustees in February 2013. The Research Foundation, which managed intellectual property created by the UAB community, will now have an expanded presence, and operate as the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The Institute will serve to create and foster an entrepreneurial and innovative ecosystem integrating the UABRF’s existing strengths and capabilities, enhancing and facilitating service and technology commercialization. The mission will include engagement of faculty in creating new classroom and experiential learning opportunities for students across campus, as well as, encourage and cultivate interdisciplinary scholarly research and publication among faculty and clinicians, and serve as the resource center for UAB as it continues to advance its role in innovation and entrepreneurship. The Institute will provide an entry point for industries seeking to collaborate with this world class university. Read more about the IIE.

 

In The News at UAB

  • Indigo Girls set to perform at UAB’s Alys Stephens Center on Sept. 23
    The duo will perform classic hits and songs from their latest album “One Lost Day.”

    Photo credit: Jeremy CowartAmerican folk rock music duo Indigo Girls will take the stage at UAB’s Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center on Wednesday, Sept. 23, at 7 p.m. Concertgoers will have an opportunity to take a walk down memory lane as the duo performs old favorites like “Closer to Fine” and “Galileo” and introduces new classics from their June 2015 release, “One Lost Day.”

    The Indigo Girls began playing small shows in the 1980s. With 12 studio albums, three live records, numerous Grammy nominations and awards, gold and platinum certifications, and decades of touring, the Indigo Girls remain relevant and just as perfectly matched vocally as when they first took to the stage.

    Consisting of Amy Ray and Emily Saliers, the pair first met as fifth- and sixth-graders in Decatur, Georgia, and began singing together during high school. Originally billed as Saliers and Ray, they adopted the name Indigo Girls during their undergraduate days at Atlanta’s Emory University. The Indigos were attending classes by day and performing as an acoustic duo in local clubs by night when they made their first recording in 1985 with the single “Crazy Game/Everybody’s Waiting (for Someone To Come Home),” which they issued on their own label, followed by an EP and, in 1987, their first full-length LP, “Strange Fire.”

    Tickets are $45.50, $55.50 and $63.50. Student tickets are $21. For more information, call 205-975-2787 or visit www.AlysStephens.org.

    The duo has stood the test of time. More than 30 years later, with their husky voices and intimate, poignant lyrics, they are still going strong. While many artists who launched their careers in the 1980s have slipped from our collective memory, the Indigo Girls are still writing and recording, championing a number of social and environmental causes, and filling halls with devoted, multigenerational audiences. The iconic duo continues to challenge itself creatively, over and over again, adding to their body of work.

    Opening for the Indigo Girls is Georgia native Hannah Thomas. An up-and-coming artist, Thomas has shared the stage with the Indigo Girls before, along with other acts such as Kristian Bush of Sugarland and Zac Brown of the Zac Brown Band. Thomas was named best country act in the Georgia Lottery’s All Access Music Search in 2011.

    The UAB Alys Stephens Performing Arts Center is located at 1200 10th Ave. South. Tickets are $45.50, $55.50 and $63.50. Student tickets are $21. For more information, call 205-975-2787 or visit www.AlysStephens.org.

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UAB Research News

  • NIH awards nearly $34 million to UAB Center for Clinical and Translational Science
    This renewing of UAB’s prestigious Center for Translational Science Award will bolster research and workforce development at UAB and throughout its regional partner network in the Southeast.

    Written by Christina Crowe

    The National Institutes of Health has awarded the University of Alabama at Birmingham Center for Clinical and Translational Science $33.59 million over four years to continue the center’s programs advancing translational research.

    Since its initial funding in 2008 through Alabama’s only Center for Translational Science Award to work toward innovative discoveries for better health, the UAB CCTS has nurtured UAB research, accelerating the process of translating laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, training a new generation of clinical and translational researchers, and engaging communities in clinical research efforts.

    The CCTS will continue to advance its mission to accelerate the delivery of new drugs, methodologies and practices to patients at UAB and throughout a partner network of 11 institutions in the Southeast.

    “We are excited by the capacity to continue to enhance our institution’s and our region’s innovative research and medical care,” said Robert Kimberly, M.D., UAB CCTS director. “Through internal and external partnerships, as well as a robust clinical environment and cutting-edge informatics and clinical trial resources, we look forward to working with our patients over the course of their lifespan.”

    Congress launched the CTSA program in 2006, which is overseen by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences.

    The amount of this award, more than double its previous funding awarded in 2008 and one of the largest at UAB, reflects an unmatched enthusiasm for the CCTS and its affiliated programs. It includes funding for 10 annual pre-doctoral training awards, 10 summer training awards, and eight career development awards for senior postdoctoral fellows or faculty-level candidates.

    “Our training programs continue to foster a culture of responsible, ethical practice among students, faculty and clinicians conducting human subjects research,” Kimberly said. “The NIH’s support of our expansive partner network, encompassing 11 regional academic and medical institutions throughout Alabama, Louisiana and Mississippi, will allow us to further grow our scope of practices and research resources as we look to tackle health disparities in the Southeast.”

    Through One Great Community, the CCTS’ community engagement enterprise, and the Community Health Innovation Awards, the CCTS engages Greater Birmingham­­-area residents in innovative programs designed by community members to improve their neighborhoods.

    “UAB is fully committed to the goals of the CCTS and to its continued development as a hub for clinical and translational research in the Southeast,” said UAB President Ray L. Watts. “This significant renewal speaks to the tremendous work and vision of our CCTS leadership and team, as well as our clinical infrastructure, scientific strengths, informatics expertise, training programs, and biostatistical and research design assistance.

    “The CCTS touches researchers in all UAB schools and across the partner network, and we are thrilled that this important work will continue with the confidence and support of the NIH.”

    Click to enlargeState and regional impact

    “The growth of the Center for Clinical and Translational Science at UAB will foster economic development in the state and throughout the region,” said Senator Richard Shelby. “With a history of providing optimal clinical care and innovation in human health, UAB’s receipt of this prestigious award enables the continued development of the workforce that is necessary to meet the needs of future research advancement.”

    Alabama Governor Robert Bentley, himself a physician, voiced his appreciation for the CCTS’ initiatives. “The center has been highly effective in providing assistance in the state’s efforts to eliminate the health disparities seen throughout our region,” Bentley said. “Whether across the life course or in underserved groups disproportionately affected by cancer, stroke, heart conditions and other diseases prevalent in our state, the center has been exemplary in reaching out to our citizens.”

    UAB Vice President, Research and Economic Development Richard Marchase, Ph.D., says he is particularly pleased that the CCTS is building on UAB’s history of serving populations burdened by health disparities through its partnerships with other state and regional institutions committed to advancing health through translational research. “It is through this culture of commitment and collaboration,” he said, “that we have become a national leader in biomedical research.”

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