Displaying items by tag: regards

Gargya Malla, M.D., Ph.D., used the UAB REGARDS study to evaluate the effect of living in a disadvantaged area on heart failure risk. She was awarded second place in a data challenge hosted by the American Heart Association® and the Association of Black Cardiologists.
Vacuuming, mopping, walking a pet or playing catch may be enough activity to avoid a stroke, according to a national study published in JAMA Network Online.
UAB epidemiology expert will evaluate genetic risk scores that can help predict personal risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases, as well as African Americans’ treatment responses to common antihypertensive therapies.
The first study to evaluate whether differences between men and women in the risk of stroke varies by race and age found that some risk factors were more important for white women than white men, but the risk factors for black women and black men had similar associations with stroke risk.  
Eating a southern-style diet, which is high in fried and processed foods, is the leading factor to explain why African-Americans have a higher risk of hypertension than whites.
Adults who consume large amounts of sugary drinks may have a higher risk of dying from heart disease or other causes.
A study to better understand racial and regional differences in deaths from strokes will be funded through 2023 by a $20.4 million grant.

A new study from UAB details the burden of sepsis — widespread infection in the body — in the United States.

New data from the REGARDS study show that blacks with the sickle cell trait are more likely to develop kidney failure requiring dialysis.
Those living in more advantaged neighborhoods are less likely to have a stroke than are their counterparts who live in less advantaged neighborhoods, according to a UAB study.
Older adults can develop cardiovascular risk factors later in life, according to a study from UAB.
UAB’s Virginia Howard has been honored for her work to find novel and powerful approaches to reduce the burden of stroke and heart disease.
While it is well-known that nonsmokers can get cancer from inhaling smoke, the amount of risk associated with secondhand smoke and stroke has remained unclear until now.
Virginia Wadley, Ph.D., says until this new JAMA study, whether or not stroke survivors are at-risk over the long term was an unknown.
The importance of preventing hypertension is reinforced by a study showing anti-hypertension medicines can increase stroke risk by 248 percent, according to new UAB School of Public Health research published in the journal Stroke.
REGARDS investigators have responded with a letter published in the AHA journal Circulation, saying it is premature to draw firm conclusions about potential overestimation of risk using the new risk formula.
A new study from UAB researchers is one of the first to study the relationship between exercise and stroke in a large biracial cohort of men and women in the U.S.
Research from the UAB School of Public Health shows that patients with chronic kidney disease may improve their health by making lifestyle behavior changes.
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