Displaying items by tag: department of epidemiology

UAB epidemiology expert will evaluate genetic risk scores that can help predict personal risk for cardiovascular and renal diseases, as well as African Americans’ treatment responses to common antihypertensive therapies.

A new study finds there are multiple ways to achieve the same health benefits from exercise — as long as your exercise “cocktail” includes plenty of light physical activity but not too much sitting.

Final results of the UAB-led national study on high blood pressure confirm a target goal of less than 120 mm Hg reduces adverse events.

Preserving brain health in an aging population is a growing concern in the United States. An estimated one in five Americans 65 years and older has mild cognitive impairment, and one in seven has dementia.
Allowing family members back into your home is a challenging thought for many, but UAB experts share ways we can safely reintegrate under one roof.
Funding from the American Heart Association will help promote preventive attitudes regarding cardiovascular health through a virtual campaign.
The study suggests that depressive symptoms are a nontraditional risk factor for stroke, something medical professionals need to take into account when talking with their patients.
American Heart Association special report highlights trends in awareness among women in the United States regarding heart disease.
This study of ischemic stroke patients is the first to associate the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio in patients with COVID-19 and ischemic stroke and stroke severity.
This is the first comprehensive genomic study of cervical cancers in sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on tumors from 212 Ugandan patients. The findings can lead to better treatments.
Epidemiologists answer questions about what reopening the state means, the impact it may have on people in urban and rural areas, and what you can do to protect yourself and your family.
The coronavirus crisis has introduced a lot of new words into daily vocabulary. Get translations to better understand how the disease spreads and what can be done to stop it.
People who spent their childhood or early adulthood in the Stroke Belt are more likely to develop cognitive impairment later, even if they have moved away.
The findings emphasize the importance of wide-reaching public health interventions to prevent hypertension among this population.
Olivia Affuso, Ph.D., was taken to the hospital after being stung more than 50 times by the bees.
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