Research - News
These microcarriers may offer an entirely different approach to treating solid human tumors of numerous pathologic subtypes by delivering their encapsulated drug cargo to a tumor and protecting against collateral tissue damage.
Just one month after major research findings showed dangerous PFAS present in more than one-third of fast food packaging tested, UAB and Notre Dame created a new technique to track PFASs in the body.

Antenatal corticosteroids given to high-risk moms are associated with better outcomes for babies born prematurely.

Unusual case of teen patient diagnosed with colorectal cancer receives innovative first-in-human clinical trial at UAB, reflecting a unique story of cancer and hope.

Overall, parents believe their teens are safer than other drivers.
Bevan, Locke, Saag are among 12 speakers who will speak at the annual, independently organized event which will challenge attendees to embrace the event’s theme of possibility.

A new study from UAB details the burden of sepsis — widespread infection in the body — in the United States.

UAB assays enabled the first genomewide association study of IgA1 O-glycosylation aberrancy in IgA nephropathy, a disease that frequently causes kidney failure.
A new mobile virtual reality system helps children learn to cross streets safely.
Inflatable braces? A new clinical trial at the UAB School of Dentistry is hoping to make metal braces a thing of the past.
UAB is a clinical site for the A4 Study of Alzheimer’s disease, recently featured in Newsweek magazine.
UAB’s School of Dentistry has ranked first in NIDCR funding since 2012.
Failure of hormone deprivation therapy used to slow prostate cancer in patients leads to castration-resistant prostate cancer, a lethal form of advanced disease with limited treatment options. Endostatin, used in combination therapy, may help delay onset of castration-resistant disease.
New data from the REGARDS study show that blacks with the sickle cell trait are more likely to develop kidney failure requiring dialysis.
UAB launches the Alabama Genomic Health Initiative, a statewide effort to use the power of genomics to improve health in Alabama.

New research from UAB sheds light on the connection between Parkinson’s disease and the trillions of bacteria in our guts. 

Increased longevity of those living with HIV means dealing with related health issues, including dementia and other cognition-related problems. An NIH grant supports development of interventions, treatments to improve everyday functioning, and quality of life.
The Blazer42 Capture the Flag Scholarship Competition provides valuable experience to high school students in an effort to inspire more to pursue careers in cybersecurity.
The findings suggest targeting specific T-cell subsets may be a therapeutic approach to prevent heart failure after a heart attack.
A UAB study shows children receiving early preventive dental care from a dentist had more frequent tooth decay-related treatment, a higher rate of visits and higher annual dental expenditures.
Matt Might, Ph.D., a strategic leader in the White House Precision Medicine Initiative, has been named the inaugural director of the Hugh Kaul Personalized Medicine Institute at UAB.
UAB will bring proton therapy, one of the most technically advanced forms of cancer-killing radiation, to Alabama with the new Proton Therapy Center.
A 90-ton machine called a cyclotron will accelerate protons to very high speeds to impact human tumors.
The function and structure of protein GARP2 in rod cells of the retina is still not clear, but researchers have shown that GARP2 accelerates retinal degeneration in mice, and have made an important step toward creating a standardized nomenclature between mice and humans for a measurement of retinal degeneration.
The Suki Foundation, Children’s of Alabama and UAB have established an endowed professorship in Rett syndrome.
Tuberculosis kills 1.8 million people a year, and 10 million more are infected. Development of host-cell directed therapies that could restore cellular function during M. tuberculosis infection, such as a “release and kill” strategy, could shorten drug treatment of TB patients.
It appears that new cells compete to ‘win’ synapse connections away from old cells, which promotes network plasticity.
Research from UAB suggests that nearly half of children with the most common type of leukemia or their parents say they took more medications than they actually did.
UAB engineers will serve in a consortium of 10 Southeastern universities to develop novel strategies for traffic problems.
Abnormal antibody production that allows inflammation leading to AIDS is detected by analysis of antibodies in gut fluid of HIV-1-infected people.
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