Research - News
This link suggests that pollutants in the environment that mimic estrogens may have a deleterious effect on heart function.
New UAB research says sensory adjustments, such as turning down the lights and reducing noise levels, can improve behavior on high-acuity psychiatric units.
ECMO and autoantibody reduction through plasma exchange, experimental therapies not available everywhere, help end an Alabama woman’s five-month medical ordeal.
Researchers suggest combining a calorie-restricted diet with high-intensity interval training could be a solution for reducing weight regain after weight loss.
This more comprehensive approach may be needed to find ways to delay the progressive heart failure.
Such basic research supports the goal of using stem cells in therapy, where an important hurdle is efficient differentiation.
A new study suggests complex solutions to gun-related deaths and goals to decrease rates based on the type of death.
Inhibition of this microRNA might improve response to newer diabetes drugs, such as Byetta, Victoza, Trulicity, Januvia, Onglyza and Tradjenta.
A two-drug combination therapy for cystic fibrosis is shown to be effective. Triple combination therapy is close behind.
Jeremy Blackburn, Ph.D., and collaborators reveal fringe communities within 4chan and Reddit have a surprisingly large influence on alternative news shared on Twitter.
A group from UAB engineering will serve as one of 16 contractors competing for upcoming space station delivery orders.
The new grants will help a UAB Biology lab further research into how metabolic derangements impact diseases such as Alzheimer’s.
UAB will examine cognitive behavior therapy, a form of psychotherapy, that may help reduce the severity of non-epileptic seizures induced by traumatic brain injury.
New research from UAB shows that maintaining healthy dendritic spines — a component of neurons — may be protective against Alzheimer’s disease.
UAB is the first in the country to use novel HyperArc High-Definition Radiotherapy on brain cancer patients.
Cancer is a disease with a thousand faces. Oncologists like Eddy Yang have to recognize which one they’re seeing with each new patient. Yang leads a pioneering new kind of cancer program at UAB: the Molecular Tumor Board.
UAB gets a CDC grant to set up a sentinel surveillance system to track an antibiotic resistant infectious agent responsible for many cases of pneumonia.
In two new studies, a UAB oncologist explores questions of choice and cost in metastatic breast cancer.
This structure will further explain how the virus infects human cells and how progeny viruses are assembled, and it may be a point of attack to disarm the virus.
A UAB study suggests that psychedelic drugs have a positive effect on antisocial, criminal behavior, warranting investigation of psychedelics as a crime reduction therapy.
Overexpression of CCND2 increased growth and division of grafted heart muscle cells, resulting in better heart function and decreased size of dead tissue.
A UAB researcher is investigating antihypertensive drugs in search of those that not only treat high blood pressure, but also boost mobility and independence in older Americans.
These results, seen in animal models, represent a potentially novel therapeutic target for the treatment of seizure disorders.
UAB now has far and away the fastest supercomputer in Alabama, accelerating the volume and speed at which transformational education, research and medical care can occur.
The $2.5 million gift from Medical Properties Trust begins a campaign that will ultimately raise $7.5 million in resources to expand and accelerate the center’s research efforts.
With an economic impact now exceeding $7.15 billion, according to Tripp Umbach, Alabama’s largest single employer’s influence on the state’s economy has grown by more than 50 percent since the last study.
Developers and educators at UAB have developed a solution to meet the challenges of getting educational resources to underserved populations by providing software and hardware programs to better train students in Ethiopia and Zambia.
Four multidisciplinary studies will focus on genetics and associated mechanisms of hyperuricemia gout, an inflammatory arthritis.
Low dietary potassium leads to calcified arteries and aortic stiffness, while increased dietary potassium alleviates those undesirable effects in a mouse model, suggesting dietary potassium may protect against heart disease and death from heart disease in humans.
Chad Thomas Hagwood, Edward E. Partridge, Catherine Danielou, Michelle Cardel and Raymond Thompson were bestowed the awards by the NAS for their personal, academic and professional achievements, service to the community, and philanthropy.
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