How do I register on DragonTrail?
Go to www.careerservices.uab.edu and click on DragonTrail Employers. Click on Register for New Account and then Register Only. Complete the registration form.

When will I be able to login directly after initial sign-in?
You should receive your username and password within 24 hrs of submitting registration.

How do I post a job in DragonTrail?

Go to http://uab-csm.symplicity.com/employers. Click on For Employers. Enter your username and password. Click Jobs on the top navigation bar. Click on Add New. Fill in the information and click Submit when finished. Required fields are marked with a red asterisk.

How do I review student resumes?
You can contact the Career Services office for a Resume Referral OR click on Resume Books from your top menu heading. You will view a listing of any current resume books that have been published. You can then click on the title of the book to view the listing of students and their resumes. Keep in mind that this is not a complete listing of our students, they must opt in to these books from their own account.

How do I schedule On-Campus Interviews?
There are two methods in which you can access schedule requests:

Click on Home on the top navigation bar and then on the Create New On-Campus Interviewing Schedule Request heading from the Quick Links menu on the right of your screen.

Click on On-Campus Recruiting from the top navigation bar and then click on the Schedule Requests tab. Finally, click on the “Add New” button and enter in your information.

When finished, click Submit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


For additional information, contact Career Services at (205) 934-4324 or email careerservices@uab.edu.

UAB News

  • Research says ‘play value’ gap exists between playgrounds in affluent and nonaffluent communities
    Play is an important part of child development, and a UAB student research project shows that disparities exist between play spaces depending on where one lives.

    Parks with low play value have physical and social barriers for play activities. These include limited open areas with closely mown grass for open play, and lack of security fencing. Such park environments serve only limited play purpose, with static rather than dynamic features of play equipment, and do not support children’s daily requirements for physical activity. Parks with low play value often lack environmental biodiversity features or loose play materials for manipulation.The play value of parks, playgrounds and open play spaces is higher in affluent communities than in nonaffluent communities, according to research from occupational therapy students in the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Health Professions.

    The findings, published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, suggest that the disparity in play spaces can affect the physical and psychological health benefits that children receive from play.

    Play value refers to the usability of any environmental features or play areas as a setting for play, generating diverse play opportunities and experiences that suit various children’s needs, motivations and abilities.

    “Children learn through play, and studies have shown that access to safe, well-designed parks provides health benefits to children,” said Gavin Jenkins, Ph.D., OTR/L, assistant professor in the Department of Occupational Therapy who mentored the student research project. “Understanding the quality of play environments will help communities ensure that all children have access to imaginative, stimulating play environments.”

    The four UAB OT students, Amy Maher, Emily Rose, Kristina Gregory and Megan Cotton, studied six parks in Mountain Brook, Alabama, and five parks in Irondale, Alabama. According to the most recent United States Census Bureau American Community Survey, the median annual income for Mountain Brook ($131,281) is more than double that of Irondale ($50,157), which is below the U.S. average. 

    The students, paired in teams of two, conducted independent evaluations of each play park using the Playable Space Quality Assessment Tool, or PSQAT. The PSQAT provides scores based on location, play value, and care and maintenance. Mountain Brook’s median scores were nearly 50 percent higher in play value (61.00 vs. 43.50) and care and maintenance (76.43 vs. 53.57) and almost double Irondale’s location score (82.14 vs. 47.14).

    “The children who were actively using the Mountain Brook play spaces appeared to have all needs available, such as clean restrooms, accessibility to play structures and spaces, and cleared walking surfaces,” Maher said. “There was also a noticeable sense of safety as police or maintenance was present while the children engaged with other children in their play environments.”

    The student authors say parks with high play value draw children and young people to visit, and also provide opportunities for a variety of play activities, including allowing children to adapt park elements for their own play purposes and support free exploration.The student authors say parks with high play value draw children and young people to visit, and also provide opportunities for a variety of play activities, including allowing children to adapt park elements for their own play purposes and support free exploration. These characteristics of parks entice children and young people to return time and again for repeat visits.

    On the other hand, parks with low play value have physical and social barriers for play activities. These include limited open areas with closely mown grass for open play, and lack of security fencing. Such park environments serve only limited play purpose, with static rather than dynamic features of play equipment, and do not support children’s daily requirements for physical activity. Parks with low play value often lack environmental biodiversity features or loose play materials for manipulation, the authors suggest.

    “Studies like this could be used to help communities determine how well they are doing, but perhaps more importantly help them to prioritize the improvements needed to their sites,” Jenkins said. “This study provides a further window into the challenges of providing suitable play environments and opportunities for children and young people who live in low-income neighborhoods.”

    “Improving parks and playgrounds would encourage families to use the play spaces, and that in-turn would give children more access to active play, which is central to child development and social, emotional, cognitive and physical well-being,” Maher said.

    The students’ research was part of their final research project supported by their Occupations of Infants, Children and Adolescents class in the Master of Science in Occupational Therapy program. As part of the program, the students learn the importance of play, stages of play, functions of play, and more, for their careers as OTs.

    In the conclusion of this study, the students noted that their research provided them “a further window into the challenges of providing suitable play environments and opportunities for children and young people who live in low-income neighborhoods.”

  • UAB faculty recognized nationally for biomedical research
    Sorge honored as a young leader in the field of pain research and neuroscience by national organization.

    Robert Sorge, Ph.D., was named one of seven Rita Allen Foundation Scholars for 2015. Sorge is an assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Psychology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    The Rita Allen Foundation Scholars program supports basic biomedical research in the fields of cancer, immunology and neuroscience. Scholars are early-stage investigators and leaders in their respective fields who are advancing our understanding of the human condition.

    Sorge’s research is primarily in the field of neuroscience, specifically focused on pain. His lab explores the interplay between addiction and pain, as well as the role of the immune system in pain sensitivity. As a scholar in pain research, Sorge will be granted $50,000 per year for up to three years to support his work.

    The Rita Allen Foundation Scholars program has supported more than 140 scientists since 1976. The program embraces innovative research with above-average risk and groundbreaking possibilities. Scholars have gone on to win the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, the National Medal of Science, the Wolf Prize in Medicine, and the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences.

    “By investing in outstanding biomedical scientists at the early stages of their careers, we are providing resources to these scholars to pioneer new approaches and discoveries,” said Elizabeth Christopherson, president and chief executive officer of the Rita Allen Foundation. “Researching basic biological questions is essential to improving human health and alleviating suffering caused by cancer, chronic pain, mental illness and other maladies.”

    Sorge joins a prestigious class of scholars, with other recipients representing Columbia University, the University of Pennsylvania, New York University and others.

  • Collat School of Business to help CPAs earn continuing education credits
    Area CPAs can earn CPE credits at summer seminars hosted by UAB.

    The University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Collat School of Business is offering two daylong seminars July 30 and Sept. 18 at The Club to help working professionals stay current on accounting and auditing changes. CPAs who complete the seminars will be able to earn up to 16 hours of Continuing Professional Education credit.

    Steve Grice, Ph.D., CPA, the Botts Professor of Accounting and director of the Master of Accountancy program at Troy University, will provide the keynote address Thursday, July 30. Grice previously served as a professor of accounting at UAB and was director of its Master of Accounting program. He has written more than 40 journal articles and provided technical consultation to various CPA firms. He currently serves as the Scholar-in-Residence for Carr, Riggs & Ingram, LLC.

    Quinton Booker, Ph.D., CPA, professor and chairman of the Department of Accounting at Jackson State University, will provide the keynote address Friday, Sept. 18. Booker is a member of the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy’s Center for the Public Trust. He served as a member of the Mississippi State Board of Public Accountancy from 1992 to 2002, and recently completed a three-year term on the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants’ board of directors.

    Individuals can attend either session for $275, or for a discounted rate of $225 for those in groups of three or more. The fee covers the sessions and materials, as well as continental breakfast, lunch and refreshments.

    Learn more and register online.

More Items

UAB Career & Professional Development Twitter