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As parents of graduates facing the toughest job market in years, what can you do to assist your son or daughter in transitioning from the secure world of classes and residence halls to the unknown reality of what lies ahead? Here are some suggestions:

Ask how you can help
Your daughter may have specific ideas about ways you can assist her. Your editing skills may be the second pair of eyes needed to critique a resume; your managerial skills could be useful as a mock interviewer; your research skills might uncover some new job leads. Think about how your role as something other than mom or dad could be helpful. But don't be pushy: Let her take the lead.

Suggest a visit to the campus career center
The campus career center provides a wealth of job search resources: Job postings, career fairs, resume assistance, and career counseling, just to name a few. Make sure your son or daughter is aware of the office. If your new grad isn't near his alma mater, suggest that he call the career services offices at local colleges and ask if help is available.

Offer networking contacts
Networking is the most effective way to find jobs in the hidden job market—where many opportunities are discovered. With your son's permission, talk to your co-workers about your son's job search. Discuss it with neighbors and friends. You never know who may know of a job opportunity.

Be ready to hear new ideas
Your son may mention attending graduate school. Or, your daughter, who has discussed a career in journalism for years, may suddenly talk about sales. Listen to your new grad's ideas with an open mind, making positive suggestions when appropriate.
Ask your new grad open-ended questions: This will show your son or daughter that you're interested—and the answers will help your new grad think through the new ideas they're considering.

Provide a sounding board when frustrations overflow
The nightly news about unemployment is stressful. Imagine trying to complete your studies and conduct job search, too. If your daughter calls to talk, but she really needs to vent, listen to her. Sometimes the best thing you can say is nothing at all.

Give an early graduation present with the job search in mind
Don't wait until May to say congratulations. Now is a great time to give a graduation present that will be used during the job search and first year on the job. Looking for ideas? Interview suits, briefcases, portfolios, and memory sticks are great gifts for the new grad.

Reassure your new grad that this bad job market is temporary
The ebb and flow of the economy is constant, and brighter days lie ahead. You've likely experienced similar ups and downs. Convey your experience to them.

Look and listen for signs of depression
If your son or daughter talks about skipping class, exhaustion, or loss of appetite, he or she might need some help. If your student is still on campus, contact appropriate campus representatives (residence life offices, counseling centers, etc.) for help.

Remind your new grad that you are proud of his or her accomplishments
A sour economy should not take away the success of earning a college degree. Be sure your son or daughter knows that you are proud of this achievement. Send a card or make a phone call to specifically convey this message.

From an article by Kelli Robinson

UAB News

  • UAB’s Joseph wins prestigious award in pediatrics
    David Joseph, M.D., lauded by UAB, Children’s of Alabama at the American Academy of Pediatrics for Excellence.

    David B. Joseph, M.D., professor in the Department of Urology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has won the 2015 Wallace Alexander Clyde Distinguished Service Award for Excellence in Pediatrics from the UAB Department of Pediatrics, Children’s of Alabama and the Alabama Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Joseph joined the faculty at UAB and the staff of Children’s of Alabama in 1986. He is chief of pediatric urology at Children’s, holding the Beverly P. Head Endowed Chair in Pediatric Urology. Joseph has a special interest in pediatric genitourinary reconstruction and neuro-urology. He has been active nationally with the Spina Bifida Association for more than 18 years and serves on its Board of Directors.

    A native of Wisconsin, Joseph has an undergraduate degree from Johns Hopkins University and completed medical school and urology residency at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He went on to fellowship training in pediatric urology at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School.

    He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and of the American College of Surgeons. He is a past president of the Society for Pediatric Urology. He is a trustee of the American Board of Urology and member of the ACGME Urology Residency Review Committee.

  • Williams earns grant to study perceptions of discrimination in health care
    Jessica Williams, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UAB Department of Health Services Administration, received a $100,000 New Connections grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to examine perceptions of discrimination in health care settings.
    Written by Kevin Storr

    Jessica Williams, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Health Services Administration, received a $100,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through the New Connections program.

    The grant will allow Williams to look at factors that influence perceptions of discrimination in health care settings, the management of hypertension in African-Americans, and how these perceptions influence medication adherence.

    “The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is deeply committed to improving health for all communities, so I am honored to receive this grant and this incredible opportunity that will establish me as an independent investigator and move me toward my research vision of communities where health care outcomes are independent of race and class,” Williams said. “I believe that the only way we can begin to improve the quality of health care encounters is to understand patient perceptions, and in many ways I feel this is a missing piece to the disparities puzzle.”

    New Connections is a national program designed to introduce new scholars to RWJF and expand the diversity of perspectives that inform the Foundation’s programming. New Connections seeks early- to mid-career scholars who are historically underrepresented ethnic or racial minorities, first-generation college graduates, or individuals from low-income communities.

    “Jessica Williams is doing important work that has the potential to influence practice and improve access to care, and this award will provide important funding for this emerging scholar,” said Christy Harris Lemak, Ph.D., chair of the UAB School of Health Professions Department of Health Services Administration. “We are proud of her and look forward to supporting her research and learning from this important work.”

    The grant also includes a mentorship component. Williams’ mentors on this project include Andrea Cherrington, M.D., associate professor in the UAB Division of Preventive Medicine and a researcher with the UAB Nutrition Obesity Research Center, and Robert Weech-Maldonado, Ph.D., professor and L.R. Jordan Chair of the HSA department who is a national authority in health disparities.

    “We are so excited to welcome Jessica Williams into the ninth cohort of New Connections grantees,” said Catherine Malone, DBA, MBA, and program officer at RWJF. “The program connects first-time grantees to the Foundation, and the new perspectives they bring are essential to solving the critical, complex issues affecting our nation’s health.”

    Williams’ grant began Sept. 1. She hopes to publish the results of her findings in the summer of 2017.

  • UAB men's basketball picked to win Conference USA
    The Blazers were picked to win Conference USA by the conference's coaches, garnering 11 of 14 first-place votes.
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