Postdoctoral Training at UAB

 

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The University of Alabama at Birmingham is committed to the development and success of outstanding postdoctoral scientists. Here at UAB, nearly 250 postdocs are training currently in a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to engineering, medicine, natural sciences & mathematics, public health, and optometry.

The UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education and the UAB Postdoc Association work together to develop career opportunities that enhance and define the training experience for all postdoctoral scholars at UAB. Past and continuing events include:

  • Courses in Grant Writing, Lab Management, Translational Science, & Job Skills
  • Structured programs in teaching and business entrepreneurship
  • Awards for career enhancement, travel, grant incentives, and internships


Because of its commitment to the success of postdoctoral fellows, UAB ranks consistently as one of the top locations among US universities for training postdoctoral scholars. Read more

 

Postdocs in the Spotlight

Current Postdoc
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Megan Ruiter, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow in Psychology

Alumni Postdoc
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Christine Sestero, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biology at the University of Montevallo


 

UAB Research News

  • The Quad Rider makes it easy to shift gears and brake, enabling people with poor grip-control to safely cycle.The University of Alabama at Birmingham and the Lakeshore Foundation are partnering with InvoTek, Inc., to create a gear and braking device that helps people with disabilities who have limited or no use of their hands operate a handcycle safely. InvoTek, a research and development company in Alma, Arkansas, has received a $175,000 Phase I Small Business Innovation...

  • New drugs to slow or even prevent Parkinson’s could be in human studies as early as 2015.Written by Matt Windsor An enzyme closely associated with genetic forms of Parkinson’s disease appears to play a larger role in its progression than previously thought, say investigators at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The new research offers encouraging evidence that drugs to block this enzyme, known as leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 or LRRK2, could slow — or even...