Postdoctoral Training at UAB

The University of Alabama at Birmingham is committed to the development and success of outstanding postdoctoral scientists. Here at UAB, nearly 250 postdocs are training currently in a variety of disciplines, including but not limited to engineering, medicine, natural sciences & mathematics, public health, and optometry.

The UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education and the UAB Postdoc Association work together to develop career opportunities that enhance and define the training experience for all postdoctoral scholars at UAB. Past and continuing events include:

  • Courses in Grant Writing, Lab Management, Translational Science, & Job Skills
  • Structured programs in teaching and business entrepreneurship
  • Awards for career enhancement, travel, grant incentives, and internships


Because of its commitment to the success of postdoctoral fellows, UAB ranks consistently as one of the top locations among US universities for training postdoctoral scholars. Read more

Postdocs in UAB News

  • Increased risk of major adverse cardiac events after the later surgery persists for one year.Carla HolcombA patient who has noncardiac surgery sometime after a stent is put into a coronary artery to open up a blockage has a greater risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) following the operation, but the optimal time to delay such elective surgery after stenting was not known. In a study of more than 28,000 patient records, first author Carla Holcomb,...

  • UAB School of Public Health research published in the journal Obesity shows seeing, hearing and smelling others’ eating foods can cause low birthweight in offspring among mice.While studies have shown that what a mother eats during pregnancy can affect her offspring, it could be that what she sees others eating can also affect her offspring. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health explores the influence it has in a...

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UAB Research News

  • Patients awaiting liver transplant who have primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) had higher wait-list mortality compared with other patients on the liver transplant list, said researchers.

  • Stylish but dangerous? UAB study looks at injuries caused by wearing high-heeled shoes.Americans love high-heeled shoes. One survey in 2003 reported that 62 percent of American women wore shoes with a 2-inch or greater heel on a regular basis. Those shoes are taking a toll. New research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that high-heeled-shoe-related injuries doubled between 2002 and 2012. The findings were published online May 12 in the Journal of Foot and...