Welcome

Welcome to the UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education!

lisa_schwiebert_2009_3Lisa Schwiebert, Associate Dean for Postdoctoral EducationThe University of Alabama at Birmingham is committed to the development and success of outstanding postdoctoral scientists. Here at UAB, nearly 250 postdoctoral fellows are training currently in a variety of disciplines, including dentistry, engineering, health professions, medicine, natural sciences and mathematics, public health, optometry, and social and behavioral sciences. Career development opportunities to enhance and define the training experience are available to all postdoctoral fellows. Because of its commitment to the success of postdoctoral fellows, UAB ranks consistently as one of the top ten locations among US universities for training postdoctoral scholars.

The UAB Office of Postdoctoral Education (OPE) was established in 1999 and was one of the first Postdoctoral offices in the country. Since its inception, the OPE has been instrumental in establishing and maintaining competitive terms, benefits and training programs for all postdoctoral fellows. It works closely with the University's academic administration, the UAB Council on Postdoctoral Education and the UAB Postdoctoral Association to address the needs and concerns of postdoctoral fellows in a timely and professional manner.

The goal of the OPE is to provide postdoctoral fellows with the opportunities and skills they need to be successful in their chosen careers. The possibilities for academic and research-related careers are ever changing; as such, we strive to prepare postdoctoral fellows for these possibilities. In doing so, the OPE is dedicated to making UAB the first choice among postdoctoral fellows as a place to work, live and succeed!

If you are considering a postdoctoral position here at UAB or are already in residence, we welcome your suggestions and look forward to working with you!

Best regards,

Lisa M. Schwiebert, Ph.D. 
Associate Dean for Postdoctoral Education

UAB News

  • It was this symbol of the classical Western hero of yore that led researchers Drs. Mark B. Cope and David B. Allison of the University of Alabama at Birmingham to label a specific kind of bias, “White Hat Bias,” that they first identified in their review of the literature on obesity.

  • They're also subject to normal cognitive aging, which brings with it a decline in numeracy skills, processing speed, flexible decision-making and short-term memory, says Daniel Marson, a professor of neurology and director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.