• The smart-dumb question, a key to writing about — and understanding — immunology

    The smart-dumb question, a key to writing about — and understanding — immunology

    The UAB freshman immunology honors seminar recently held a Q&A with Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper reporter Matt Richtel.

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  • DREAM Challenge to automate assessment of radiographic damage from rheumatoid arthritis

    DREAM Challenge to automate assessment of radiographic damage from rheumatoid arthritis

    UAB is helping develop automated technology to assess joint damage from rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • Research points to possible target to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF

    Research points to possible target to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF

    This study included preclinical experiments and use of bronchoalveolar cells from IPF patients.

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  • Out of the Curricular Shadows: Revolutionizing Undergraduate Immunology Education

    Out of the Curricular Shadows: Revolutionizing Undergraduate Immunology Education

    Immunology has traditionally been studied at graduate levels, but faculty at UAB think that giving undergraduates the ability to study this interdisciplinary field will lead to greater numbers of immunologists entering the field. You can read their study in Frontiers of Immunology.

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  • Sleckman to lead O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Sleckman to lead O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center

    Harvard-trained physician and clinician-scientist will begin his new role Jan. 6, 2020.

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  • Max Cooper receives Lasker Award for immunology

    Max Cooper receives Lasker Award for immunology

    Cooper spent 40 years at UAB, where he made countless discoveries in immunology.

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  • Alumni Spotlight: Eric Meyer, Owner and Founder of Cahaba Brewing

    Alumni Spotlight: Eric Meyer, Owner and Founder of Cahaba Brewing

    Cahaba Brewing is one of the most popular and successful breweries in Birmingham. “When I began brewing, I started looking at what the science of brewing is,” says Eric. “A lot of people relate brewing beer more to cooking than anything else, but there’s so much more to it.

    by Morgan Burke

    In 1996, Huntsville-native Eric Meyer arrived at UAB with his sights set on a career in medicine. Like any good pre-health track student would do, he registered as a biology major and started on the path to medical school. In the Biology Department, he was introduced to professors who broadened his experiences and introduced him to new ways of thinking. Dr. Dan Jones and Dr. Ken Marion shared their love of botany and wildlife with Eric and included him in field research studies.

    “As a young person, you just have to hold on and be ready to grab hold of small bits of what Dr. Marion has to offer,” Eric says.

    Photo credit: Cary Norton.By his junior year, Eric had a change of heart. Over the past two years, he had fostered his passion for the environment, botany, and natural sciences and had developed a curiosity in geographic information systems (GIS). With dwindling interest in medical school, Eric worked with his academic advisor to create an Individually Designed major with a minor in Biology. This new course of study landed him an internship with the Jefferson County Storm Water Management Authority canoeing and hiking the Cahaba River while mapping the entire river with GPS. Eric graduated in 2001 and continued his GIS work with Jefferson County while completing Emergency Medical Technician classes at UAB to be a firefighter. For the past 16 years, Eric has worked as a full-time firefighter in the city of Mountain Brook.

    When he wasn’t at the firehouse, Eric spent his downtime experimenting with home beer brewing. After years of refining his craft, he and a group of friends devised a plan to open a brewery. In 2011, Cahaba Brewing Company was born. Eight years in, and Cahaba Brewing is one of the most popular and successful breweries in Birmingham. At Cahaba, Eric is able to put his scientific background to good use.

    “When I began brewing, I started looking at what the science of brewing is,” says Eric. “A lot of people relate brewing beer more to cooking than anything else, but there’s so much more to it. Any little change [in ingredients or process] can alter the beer’s flavor and appearance.”

    He relies on research methods honed during his years at UAB to improve upon the production process and create a clean and consistent product.

    Though Eric’s two full-time jobs and family life keep him busy, he has continued to stay active in the UAB community. Over the past couple of years, he has collaborated on beer-related grant proposals and research with Dr. Jeff Morris, Microbiologist and Assistant Professor of Biology, and Elliott Greene, a recent graduate of the Department of Biology. Elliott now works in Cahaba’s lab running tests on beer to search for wild yeast and bacteria that can harm their product.

    In 2015, Eric was recognized by the UAB National Alumni Society as a member of the UAB Excellence in Business Top 25 class. In 2017, he was honored with the College of Arts and Sciences’ (CAS) Distinguished Young Alumni Award, and he is a current member of the UAB CAS Alumni Board. Eric also regularly provides a lending ear and mentorship to UAB undergraduate students aspiring to be entrepreneurs and scientists.

    In addition to supporting UAB, Eric supports the greater Birmingham community by donating a portion of Cahaba’s proceeds to local charities and organizations during their ‘Goodwill Wednesdays’ and other special events. Eric appreciates the support and foundation he received as a UAB undergraduate student, and now he’s doing his part to pay it forward and help his community.

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  • Amsler, Kempin Reuter receive mentorship award

    Amsler, Kempin Reuter receive mentorship award

    The UAB Graduate Dean's Excellence in Mentorship Award recognizes full-time regular UAB faculty members who have demonstrated exceptional accomplishments as mentors of graduate students and/or postdoctoral fellows.

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Nancy Love

    Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Nancy Love

    On June 5, 1971, Nancy Love became the first woman to receive a master’s degree from the Department of Biology.

    First Woman to Graduate with a Master’s Degree

    Nancy Love, a Gadsden, Ala. native, arrived at UAB in spring 1968. She had completed a Bachelor of Arts degree, cum laude, at Vanderbilt University and was eager to delve deeper into biology. Under Dr. Patrick Dagg’s mentorship, Nancy joined the UAB Department of Biology graduate program and began research on early developmental events of mouse embryos. The program had just been established, and she was one of only a few female students. Even so, she recalls UAB feeling like a breath of fresh air after spending four years in Vanderbilt’s high-pressure environment. She enjoyed the opportunities UAB offered, particularly the graduate classes she took in UAB’s medical school and serving as a teaching assistant for the undergraduate introductory biology course. One special opportunity was provided by Dr. Dagg who arranged for Nancy to spend the summer of 1969 doing research at Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. On June 5, 1971, Nancy became the first woman to receive a master’s degree from the Department of Biology.

    Nancy went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and later joined the faculty at the University of Maryland’s Zoology Department. She spent thirteen years at the University of Maryland, eventually transitioning into an administrative role where she served as the Assistant Provost of Behavioral and Social Sciences and later as the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies. After relocation to Charlottesville, Virginia, and marriage to a University of Virginia faculty member, Nancy joined the faculty of the University of Virginia’s School of Medicine, where she spent 10 years in research administration before retiring in 2000. Nancy and her husband Tom currently enjoy a calm life in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. In her spare time, she works away at a fiction book she’s writing – a murder mystery at a medical school – using all her experiences during graduate school to describe faculty and graduate students and their misadventures.

    More Pioneering Women in UAB Biology

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Janice Roberts

    Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Janice Roberts

    In August 1971, Janice Roberts became the second woman to graduate with a master’s degree from UAB’s Department of Biology.

    One of the First Women to Graduate with a Ph.D.

    Upon graduating from nearby Judson College, Janice Roberts took a research position at Birmingham’s Southern Research Institute. Confident in her desire to pursue a career in research, she enrolled in graduate school at the Extension Center for the University of Alabama (soon to become UAB) researching ribosomes under Dr. Donald Fattig’s mentorship. During that time, something unexpected happened: Janice developed a love of teaching. Since childhood, she declared she would never become an educator, but the teaching assistantship that helped fund her graduate studies sparked her passion for teaching and changed the trajectory of her career. In August 1971, Janice became the second woman to graduate with a master’s degree from UAB’s Department of Biology.

    Later that year, Janice accepted a position as an instructor in the Biology Department at Jefferson State Community College (known then as Jefferson State Junior College). She thrived in the classroom, teaching courses in microbiology and freshman biology, as well as the interdisciplinary honors science course. In 1980, Janice took a leave of absence from JSCC to return to UAB to pursue her Ph.D. Janice’s doctoral research, performed under Dr. Patrick Dagg’s mentorship, studied caffeine-urethane interactions in mouse embryos. She was happy to be back at UAB among the close-knit group of graduate students. In 1983, Janice received her doctorate from UAB’s Department of Biology (only the second woman to do so) and then returned to her teaching career at JSCC. During her time at JSCC, Janice received many local, regional, and national accolades, including a Fulbright Teacher Exchange Fellowship in England, as well as the state of Alabama’s first ever Outstanding Junior College Faculty Award.

    Janice retired from Jefferson State Community College in 2010 after 38 years of service. A long-time supporter of Birmingham’s arts scene, Janice is a docent for the Birmingham Museum of Art and leads tours of the museum. As a lay member of the Board of the American Pulmonology Medicine Institute, she helps promote scholarship programs for medical students. Since retirement, Janice has indulged her love of travel and has visited six of the seven continents. In her down time, she enjoys playing bridge and spending time with her family, especially her great nieces and nephews.

    More Pioneering Women in UAB Biology

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  • Welcome back: Information for our students

    Welcome back: Information for our students

    Are you ready for Spring 2018? Our online newsletter is full of information for our students, from class registration information to research opportunities.

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  • New Degrees in Computer Science, Digital Forensics, Immunology and Genetics and Genomics Sciences

    New Degrees in Computer Science, Digital Forensics, Immunology and Genetics and Genomics Sciences

    The College of Arts and Sciences is proud to offer new degrees in Computer Science, Digital Forensics, Immunology, and Genetics and Genomics Sciences.

    The College of Arts and Sciences is proud to now offer a Bachelor of Science degree in Digital Forensics. This interdisciplinary degree program, a joint offering from the Department of Criminal Justice and the Department of Computer Science, will prepare graduates for a professional career in the field of digital forensics and cybersecurity.

    “The program is a mixture of criminal justice and computer science,” said Jeffery Walker, Ph.D., chair of Department of Justice Sciences. “The goal is to provide students with the tools they need in computer programming to work effectively within a computer environment and understand the behavior of those who may be a threat to computer systems or engage in cybercrime. Students will also develop an understanding of the legal system and processes necessary to gather digital evidence and support a computer investigation in court if necessary.”

    In addition, the College also provides students with a new Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science, the only B.A. in computer science in the state. Bachelor of Arts degree programs in computer science are emerging across the country in response to industry growth and demand. The Department of Computer and Information Sciences joins a short list of computer science programs in the Southeast to offer the degree.

    “One of our goals is to offer innovative interdisciplinary programs that span the traditional boundaries of science, arts and humanities,” said Dean Palazzo. “With the ever-increasing use of computers and computer software in all aspects of life, computer science is becoming an integral part of many fields of study. This new degree will give students a unique opportunity to combine their interests and maximize career prospects.”

    And two degrees offered in partnership with the School of Medicine are also available to undergraduates in fall 2017: the Bachelor of Science in Immunology, and the Bachelor of Science in Genetics and Genomics Sciences

    “The B.S. in Immunology is a cutting-edge major,” says Louis Justement, Ph.D., director of the Immunology program, and a professor in the microbiology department in the School of Medicine. “Students will get comprehensive experience in the scientific process, critical thinking, problem solving, scientific methodology and in communicating science. Our goal is to prepare students for the challenges and opportunities of the future — and build up a pipeline of young immunologists to tackle the pressing problems of the 21st century.”

    Likewise, the Genetics and Genomics program is one of only of a small group of undergraduate programs available at American universities and offers a rich environment of research, training, and education. The degree is offered in partnership between the Department of Biology and the Department of Genetics in the School of Medicine. Students will receive strong educational and research experiences and will have the opportunity to develop skills in leadership, teaching, research, providing professional services, and scholarship.

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