Jeff Hansen

Jeff Hansen

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Research Editor

jeffhans@uab.edu • (205) 209-2355

Communicates UAB research discoveries and initiatives from across the university for a variety of audiences.

Specific beats include: biochemistry; cell, developmental and integrated biology; microbiology; molecular genetics; neurobiology; pathology; pharmacology and tocixology; Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance; Bill L. Harbert Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Yabing Chen, Ph.D., is the first researcher at the Birmingham VA to receive this highest honor for a non-physician scientist.

The higher infectivity correlates with mutations that increase viral binding to a cell surface glucosaminoglycan, heparan sulfate.

This finding upends the long-held paradigm that priming during lung infections takes place only in the draining lymph nodes, and it will be key to developing more efficient vaccinations and therapies for respiratory challenges.

The John B. Barnwell Award for outstanding achievement in clinical science research is the highest honor of the VA’s Clinical Science Research and Development Service.

A Bcl-2 inhibitor that has FDA approval for treatment of several leukemias reversed lung fibrosis in a bleomycin mouse model.

In this arteriolar niche, breast cancer stem cells and arteriolar endothelial cells cross-talk using a well-known signaling pathway. Targeting this pathway may offer therapeutic potential.

The drug Vismodegib, tested in a breast cancer model, is an inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, a form of cell communication manipulated by the tumor microenvironment.

Understanding how reductive stress is controlled may help personalize treatment of heart failure patients, leading to better outcomes.

The histone methyltransferase DOT1L — the potential target — is overexpressed in ovarian cancer, and high levels of expression correlate with reduced progression-free and overall survival.

MicroCT of infected human lung tissue, along with histology and immunohistochemistry, was used to construct images of TB granulomas, airways and vasculature.

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