Jeff Hansen

Jeff Hansen

| This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(205) 975-3914

Communicates UAB research discoveries and initiatives from across the university for a variety of audiences. Also has beats in biochemistry, cell biology, microbiology, pathology, the Alabama Drug Discovery Alliance and the Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.
UAB assays enabled the first genomewide association study of IgA1 O-glycosylation aberrancy in IgA nephropathy, a disease that frequently causes kidney failure.
Failure of hormone deprivation therapy used to slow prostate cancer in patients leads to castration-resistant prostate cancer, a lethal form of advanced disease with limited treatment options. Endostatin, used in combination therapy, may help delay onset of castration-resistant disease.
The findings suggest targeting specific T-cell subsets may be a therapeutic approach to prevent heart failure after a heart attack.
A 90-ton machine called a cyclotron will accelerate protons to very high speeds to impact human tumors.
The function and structure of protein GARP2 in rod cells of the retina is still not clear, but researchers have shown that GARP2 accelerates retinal degeneration in mice, and have made an important step toward creating a standardized nomenclature between mice and humans for a measurement of retinal degeneration.
Tuberculosis kills 1.8 million people a year, and 10 million more are infected. Development of host-cell directed therapies that could restore cellular function during M. tuberculosis infection, such as a “release and kill” strategy, could shorten drug treatment of TB patients.
It appears that new cells compete to ‘win’ synapse connections away from old cells, which promotes network plasticity.
The award recognizes a significant paper by Cui in Cell Death and Differentiation.
Abnormal antibody production that allows inflammation leading to AIDS is detected by analysis of antibodies in gut fluid of HIV-1-infected people.
Cardiac muscle patches in this proof-of-concept research may represent an important step toward the clinical use of 3-D-printing technology, as researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer.
Page 1 of 12
Back to Top