The UAB Department of Occupational Health & Safety's mission is to ensure that our customers have a safe workplace by providing them with the service and knowledge necessary to protect themselves, the UAB community, and the environment.

Heat is one of the leading weather-related killer in the U.S., resulting in hundreds of fatalities each year and even more heat-related illnesses.

Learn about the health dangers of heat from the National Weather Service and how you can practice heat safety wherever you are.

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Each Fourth of July, many celebrate the holiday with barbeque, parties, boating, and generally having fun. It is, after all, a celebration of the country's independence. After the sun has set and the day's parties are winding down, another round of celebration cranks up by shooting off fireworks.

Enjoy the celebration of our country's independence but do so safely and responsibly. The misuse of fireworks account for a significant number of emergency room visits. Make sure you are around to see them this year and in the future.

View the Fireworks Safety Checklist
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Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

Temperatures are rising across the country and many cities are feeling the heat of 100 degrees or more. With the addition of humidity, some areas will begin to experience extreme heat. During extreme heat, it is important to stay cool.

Extreme heat causes more deaths than hurricanes, tornados, floods and earthquakes combined. Heat related illnesses occur when the body is not able to compensate and properly cool itself. The great news is extreme heat is preventable by following a few tips: