Department of History

  • History students author stories for “Alabama Heritage” blog

    Kaye Cochran Nail, instructor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of History, is finding innovative ways for her History of Alabama (HC-116 2C) students to craft and share public history stories with audiences across the state.

    Kaye Cochran Nail, instructor in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of History, is finding innovative ways for her History of Alabama (HC-116 2C) students to craft and share public history stories with audiences across the state.

    Prior to the Fall 2021 semester, Nail connected with Rebecca Minder, director of Alabama Heritage magazine, to co-create a new learning opportunity for undergraduate students at UAB. Minder quickly noted that the magazine—which is officially co-published by UAB, the University of Alabama, and the Alabama Department of Archives and History—has a popular blog that regularly needs well-researched and engaging content. Together, Nail and Minder decided the students were well-positioned to support this valuable storytelling effort.

    “It has turned out to be a great way for our UAB students to join with other students to publish blogs on interesting topics related to Alabama history,” said Nail.

    So far, her students have published eight blogs on topics including the Tuskegee syphilis study, the Battle of Mobile Bay, and Lewis Smith Lake. Throughout the remainder of the semester, students will continue to author and publish pieces for the website.

    "We are honored and excited to be working with the young scholars in Kaye Cochran Nail's Alabama history course this semester,” said Susan E. Reynolds, Ph.D., editor of Alabama Heritage magazine. “Their contributions to our blog have been valuable to our readership, and we think it is wonderful that these students are taking an interest in our state's history. We hope to continue this partnership in the future so that more students will be able to engage in the Alabama history community.”

    Moving forward, Nail hopes to deepen the partnership with Alabama Heritage magazine and create more opportunities for students to obtain hands-on experience with public history.

    According to Jonathan Wiesen, Ph.D., chair of the Department of History, “It is inspiring to see our students so engaged in Public History with these blog entries. This is exactly the kind of community engagement that I love to see at UAB—students using their knowledge of history in service of educating our fellow Alabamians.”

    Read the Alabama Heritage blog.

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  • Learn about the rise of anti-Western Islamism from award-winning historian

    UAB Department of History is hosting an event that will explore the French occupation of Syria and its impact on anti-Western radical Islamism.

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  • 1850s horror Twitter, recursive propaganda, mapping mutations: Faculty grants seed new projects and nurture careers

    Projects selected for the UAB Faculty Development Grants Program offer an intriguing look into the creativity and range of research and scholarship on campus.

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  • UAB grad and filmmaker reaching bigger audiences

    Anissa Latham nurtured her storytelling and filmmaking skills during her time at University of Alabama at Birmingham — now, with new partners and supporters investing in her work, she’s bringing her creative vision to the world.

    Anissa Latham nurtured her storytelling and filmmaking skills during her time at University of Alabama at Birmingham — now, with new partners and supporters investing in her work, she’s bringing her creative vision to the world.

    Latham earned a B.A. in African American Studies and a B.A. in Cultural Digital Storytelling (an individually designed major) from UAB's College of Arts and Sciences in 2017. She was also a member of the UAB Honors College. As an undergraduate student, Latham found many opportunities to write and share stories across campus and the community. She served as a staff writer for Kaleidoscope — UAB's student-run digital news outlet — and, during her time as an intern and fellow with UAB Digital Media, she wrote content and managed social media for the African American Studies program, giving her a chance to further connect with the program and its director, Kay Morgan, Ph.D.

    Recently, Latham reconnected with Dr. Morgan for a conversation on Juneteenth with UAB School of Medicine Dean Selwyn Vickers, M.D., for his podcast, “The Checkup.” The episode will air on June 18, 2021 and will be available here.

    June will be an exciting month for Latham. She will also premiere her new film “Missing Magic” at the American Film Institute (AFI) DOCS Film Festival, which will take place the week of June 22-27. She directed and co-produced — along with UAB alumna Kelsey Harrison — the film which will be included in the festival’s Spotlight on the Hindsight Project series. "Missing Magic" will be screening free throughout the duration of the AFI DOCS Film Festival, and ticket reservations are available here.

    When asked to summarize the film, Latham offered the following description: “As uprisings spread across the country, a young poet in Birmingham, Alabama, becomes involved in local protests against decades of police brutality. As he tries to reconcile the city’s modern image as a diverse and welcoming metropolis with its violent and complex civil rights history, he suddenly becomes a part of the story when he’s arrested at a demonstration.”

    "Missing Magic'' was one of 77 films selected by the AFI for the 2021 AFI DOCS Film Festival. Latham received support for the film from the Hindsight Project, an initiative that supports Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) filmmakers living in the American South and U.S. Territories. Through the Hindsight Project, six filmmakers — including Latham — received production support from Firelight Media, the Center for Asian American Media, and Reel South.

    Reel South — a documentary series reckoning with the South’s past, present, and future — will also premiere all six Hindsight Project films on its respective public media platforms. “Missing Magic” will be featured on Alabama Public Television (APT).

    Along with support from the Hindsight Project and APT, Latham also received mentorship from celebrated filmmaker and producer Daphne McWilliams.

    Latham lends her talents to other outlets and platforms too. She edits and produces content for Meredith Corporation, creating video content for AllRecipes, Cooking Light, and Southern Living. And she’s a video producer for Red Clay Media, generating content for the "It's a Southern Thing" brand. One of her recent works for “It’s a Southern Thing” connects back to her recent conversation with Dr. Morgan — it’s entitled, Juneteenth: America has Two Independence Day.

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  • UAB history students use Birmingham newspaper archives to create powerful project with the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center

    Emma Herr and Chris Bertolini examined Birmingham Public Library newspaper archives from the Nazi period of 1933-1945, focusing on key Holocaust events. Their work will be used by the BHEC and United Stated Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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  • Celebrate 23 books authored by CAS faculty in 2020

    Writing a book isn’t easy, but faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences produced nearly two-dozen — for the second year in a row. Twenty faculty from 13 departments wrote books on police violence, John Milton, democracy in Bangladesh, addiction, postcommunist theatre and more.

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  • UAB history journal for student scholarship wins a national award

    The annual Vulcan Historical Review was honored in the 2020 Gerald D. Nash History Graduate Online Journal Competition.

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  • More than 1,100 employees to be honored with annual service awards

    This year, the university recognizes 50 years of service by Jeanne Hutchison, Ph.D., and Ferdinand Urthaler, M.D., and 45 years of service by Robert Kim M.D., and Joseph Lovetto. In addition, 294 employees with 20 or more years and 904 with five, 10 and 15 years will honored for their longevity.

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  • A passion for films helps Gareth Jones inspire honors students

    Jones has attended the Sundance Film Festival for more than 20 years and uses his experiences to spark students’ analytical skills in film studies classes at UAB.

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  • Watch, listen to these Birmingham stories during Black History Month

    Find out how a local DJ passed coded messages to protestors, what life was like in a company town, why Black workers flocked to Birmingham’s steel mills and more in short films and oral histories from UAB students and faculty.

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  • Winners of the 2020-2021 “Building a Multicultural Curriculum” grants

    Congratulations to the winning proposals for the 2020-2021 academic year.

    This fall, all tenured, tenure-track, and non-tenure-earning College of Arts and Sciences faculty were invited to submit proposals for a new grant titled, “Building a Multicultural Curriculum.” The goal of these awards is to support faculty in developing new courses or revising existing classes in order to expand the College’s offerings that will support students’ diversity awareness and build their multicultural competence.

    Congratulations to the winning proposals for the 2020-2021 academic year.

    • Dr. Erin Borry, Department of Political Science and Public Administration: “Isms in Public Administration”
    • Dr. Olivio J. Clay, Department of Psychology: “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Research and the Workplace”
    • Prof. Michele Forman, Department of History: “Our Histories: Documentary Film and Public History in Birmingham”
    • Dr. Reginald Jackson, Department of Music: “African American Music from 1619-Present”
    • Dr. Dione Moultrie King, Department of Social Work: “The Health and Well-being of Black Americans: A Social Work Approach”
    • Dr. Angela Lewis-Maddox, Department of Political Science and Public Administration: “Social Justice and Pop Culture”
    • Dr. Samiksha Raut, Department of Biology: “Building a Multicultural Curriculum”
    • Prof. Ana Maria Santiago, Department of English: “Themes in Lit with a Latina-o-x American Identity Focus”

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  • UAB’s Department of History hosts “A Black Woman Discovers her Family’s Nazi Past” lecture on Nov. 9

    Join UAB’s Department of History and the Birmingham Holocaust Education Center for a Zoom lecture with Jennifer Teege as she discusses her Nazi family ties.

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  • UAB hosts “History of Birmingham” on Facebook Live, Sept. 10

    Join UAB’s Institute for Human Rights for a Facebook Live discussion on the civil rights history of Birmingham that explores the effects of racist policies both past and present.

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  • 7 honored as emeritus faculty

    David Chaplin, Harriett Amos Doss, Stuart Frank, William Grizzle, Wendy Gunther-Canada, Robert Kleinstein and Andrew Rucks have been designated emeritus professors for exceptional service to the university and their profession.

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  • UAB National Alumni Society Top 25 Excellence in Business Awards

    The 2020 UAB Excellence in Business Top 25 event was a little different this year, but the celebration, held via Zoom on Thursday, June 25, was just as meaningful as previous award ceremonies.

    The 2020 UAB Excellence in Business Top 25 event was a little different this year, but the celebration, held via Zoom on Thursday, June 25, was just as meaningful as previous award ceremonies. Nine College of Arts and Sciences alumni were honored as members of the 2020 class—we are very proud of their achievements.

    These deserving graduates were among 25 UAB alumni recognized for their success at a company they founded, owned, or managed. The UAB National Alumni Society has ranked and verified the nominated companies based on the annual growth rate for the three most recent reporting periods.

    Companies being considered for an Excellence in Business Award must meet the following criteria:

    1. The company must be owned, managed or founded by a UAB graduate (or group of graduates) who meets one of the following:
      • Owned 50 percent or more of the company during the most recent eligible period.
      • Served on the most senior/division leadership team (chairman, CEO, president, partner, vice president, broker, etc.) during the eligible period.
    2. The company has been in operation for a minimum of three years prior to December 31, 2019.
    3. The company has verifiable revenues of at least $150,000 for its most recent 12-month reporting period.

    Congratulations to our deserving graduates!

    ADAM ALDRICH

    Aldrich is the president and co-founder of Airship, a software development firm in Birmingham. Airship deploys a wide array of technologies to service clients in 11 states and across a range of industries, including healthcare, construction, retail, insurance, real estate, non-profit, and fitness. Aldrich graduated with a B.S. in computer and information sciences in 2008.

    JOSHUA BAKER

    Baker is the owner and managing director of Baker Camp Arnold Capital Management, a premier, full-service financial advisory firm located in Hoover, Alabama, with a nationwide presence. The firm offers clients concierge-quality advisory and planning services customized for their individual needs and goals. Its approach is to centralize clients’ diverse financial strategies and life plans to provide a coordinated, efficient, and effective road map for financial security. Baker graduated with a B.A. in history in 2004.


    JOHN BURDETT

    Burdett graduated with a B.S. in computer and information sciences in 2000. Today he is the CEO of Fast Slow Motion, which offers expert Salesforce guidance for growing businesses. The company focuses on implementing Salesforce as a platform to run businesses so companies can focus on growth—not managing technology or worrying about operations. Its team has expertise across a wide range of businesses and industries.

    DAVID FORRESTALL

    Forestall founded SecurIT360 in 2009. The full-service, cybersecurity and compliance consulting firm has grown consistently year after year. With offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Birmingham, SecurIT360 has partnered with hundreds of organizations nationwide and abroad to measure, monitor, and respond to cyber risk. Forrestall graduated with a B.S. in physics in 1996.


    JOE MALUFF

    Maluff graduated with a B.S. in Psychology in 1996. Today, he is an owner of Full Moon Bar-B-Que, one of the Southeast’s most popular restaurants. Joe and his brother David bought the original restaurant and have grown the business while still maintaining the landmark restaurant’s family feel. Full Moon employs 345 people across Alabama.

    BRADY McLAUGHLIN

    McLaughlin is CEO of Trio Safety CPR+AED, a family of four life-saving brands designed to prepare the general public to save lives with AEDs, CPR, first-aid training, and bleeding control kits. They employ 13 team members in Birmingham and have nearly 40 contractors nationwide. McLaughlin graduated in 2009 with a degree in Communication Studies.


    CHRISTINA SMITH

    Smith graduated in 2009 with a Masters in Public Administration, and today she is the owner and principal of Smith Strategies Association Management, which provides resources to help member associations succeed. Smith began in 2016 with the Alabama chapter of the American College of Cardiology. Four years later, the company manages seven membership associations that collectively have more than 3,500 members and a budget of more than $7 million.

    CORY WAGGONER

    Waggoner is CEO of Higher Yields Consulting, a cannabis consulting firm located in Denver, Colorado. Higher Yields provides assistance for businesses seeking guidance and advice in this highly competitive industry. The company provides government support, compliance training, garden management, commercial facility build and design services, branding, and business development services. Waggoner graduated with a B.S. in Justice Sciences in 2009


    JAMES WU

    Wu is Co-Founder and CEO of DeepMap, which has a goal to provide the world’s best HD mapping and localization services for autonomous vehicles and smart cities. Founded in 2016, DeepMap employs about 140 people, including a growing team of experienced engineers and product visionaries. It partners with global companies including Ford, Honda, SAIC Motor, Bosch, Daimler, and Einride. Wu graduated with an M.S. in computer and information sciences in 2001 and a Ph.D. in 2003.

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  • Maigen Sullivan awarded the 2020 Society of American Archivists Innovator Award for Invisible Histories Project

    UAB graduate student Maigen Sullivan has been recognized for her leadership, creativity and community-outreach impact.

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  • UAB hosts “Human Rights in Times of COVID-19” on Facebook Live, May 21

    Join UAB’s Institute for Human Rights for a Facebook Live discussion on human rights during the novel coronavirus pandemic.

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  • Faith, determination and resilience pushed graduating student Cheqana Jervey to the finish line

    One UAB student conquered her circumstances with dedication and grace in order to graduate in spring 2020.

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  • History Professor Publishes New Book

     
    Andrew S. Baer, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of History, has published a new book entitled, “Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police Torture Scandal and Social Movements for Police Accountability in Chicago.”
     

    Andrew S. Baer, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of History, has published a new book entitled, “Beyond the Usual Beating: The Jon Burge Police Torture Scandal and Social Movements for Police Accountability in Chicago,” (University of Chicago Press).

    Baer studied the Civil Rights Movement early in his career, but over time he began to focus on cities in the northern United States, including Chicago.

    “My research interests lie on the intersection of race, policing, and social movements,” Baer says. “While this book focuses on Chicago from the 1970s to the present, these issues are timeless, and I hope my arguments are transportable to other contexts. I decided to study police torture in Chicago and social movements for police accountability because I wanted to join scholars who have pushed research on the Civil Rights Movement into new directions, namely by focusing on the period after 1970, on issues other than voting rights and desegregation, and locations beyond the South.”

    Baer says the book is applicable beyond a specific city or time frame. “The Chicago police torture cases remain relevant for both abstract and concrete reasons. On an abstract level, many of the general themes of my work—racial disparities in law enforcement, police violence, and grassroots resistance—remain prevalent in cities across America today. Activists and policymakers might draw lessons from this history to improve policing and ensure accountability in the present day. On a more concrete level, the survivors of police torture in Chicago continue to suffer the effects of their abuse.”

    Baer is now working on his second book, “Black and Missing,” which explores the intersection of race, law enforcement, and missing persons.

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  • Catch up on your reading with one of these 13 books authored by CAS faculty

    Do you have more time on your hands while social-distancing? Faculty and staff in the College of Arts and Sciences published 13 books in 2019 on subjects ranging from lifestyles and aging to advancements in satellite archaeology.

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