• Department of Computer Science will host annual high school programming contest

    High school programming contest for Alabama students to be held April 6 at UAB.

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  • Study: Low-carb diet provides relief from knee osteoarthritis

    The diet increased quality of life, and it decreased serum levels of the adipokine leptin and a marker of oxidative stress.

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Nancy Love

    On June 5, 1971, Nancy Love became the first woman to receive a master’s degree from the Department of Biology.

    First Woman to Graduate with a Master’s Degree

    Nancy Love, a Gadsden, Ala. native, arrived at UAB in spring 1968. She had completed a Bachelor of Arts degree, cum laude, at Vanderbilt University and was eager to delve deeper into biology. Under Dr. Patrick Dagg’s mentorship, Nancy joined the UAB Department of Biology graduate program and began research on early developmental events of mouse embryos. The program had just been established, and she was one of only a few female students. Even so, she recalls UAB feeling like a breath of fresh air after spending four years in Vanderbilt’s high-pressure environment. She enjoyed the opportunities UAB offered, particularly the graduate classes she took in UAB’s medical school and serving as a teaching assistant for the undergraduate introductory biology course. One special opportunity was provided by Dr. Dagg who arranged for Nancy to spend the summer of 1969 doing research at Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. On June 5, 1971, Nancy became the first woman to receive a master’s degree from the Department of Biology.

    Nancy went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Cell Biology from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and later joined the faculty at the University of Maryland’s Zoology Department. She spent thirteen years at the University of Maryland, eventually transitioning into an administrative role where she served as the Assistant Provost of Behavioral and Social Sciences and later as the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies. After relocation to Charlottesville, Virginia, and marriage to a University of Virginia faculty member, Nancy joined the faculty of the University of Virginia’s School of Medicine, where she spent 10 years in research administration before retiring in 2000. Nancy and her husband Tom currently enjoy a calm life in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley. In her spare time, she works away at a fiction book she’s writing – a murder mystery at a medical school – using all her experiences during graduate school to describe faculty and graduate students and their misadventures.

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Janice Roberts

    In August 1971, Janice Roberts became the second woman to graduate with a master’s degree from UAB’s Department of Biology.

    One of the First Women to Graduate with a Ph.D.

    Upon graduating from nearby Judson College, Janice Roberts took a research position at Birmingham’s Southern Research Institute. Confident in her desire to pursue a career in research, she enrolled in graduate school at the Extension Center for the University of Alabama (soon to become UAB) researching ribosomes under Dr. Donald Fattig’s mentorship. During that time, something unexpected happened: Janice developed a love of teaching. Since childhood, she declared she would never become an educator, but the teaching assistantship that helped fund her graduate studies sparked her passion for teaching and changed the trajectory of her career. In August 1971, Janice became the second woman to graduate with a master’s degree from UAB’s Department of Biology.

    Later that year, Janice accepted a position as an instructor in the Biology Department at Jefferson State Community College (known then as Jefferson State Junior College). She thrived in the classroom, teaching courses in microbiology and freshman biology, as well as the interdisciplinary honors science course. In 1980, Janice took a leave of absence from JSCC to return to UAB to pursue her Ph.D. Janice’s doctoral research, performed under Dr. Patrick Dagg’s mentorship, studied caffeine-urethane interactions in mouse embryos. She was happy to be back at UAB among the close-knit group of graduate students. In 1983, Janice received her doctorate from UAB’s Department of Biology (only the second woman to do so) and then returned to her teaching career at JSCC. During her time at JSCC, Janice received many local, regional, and national accolades, including a Fulbright Teacher Exchange Fellowship in England, as well as the state of Alabama’s first ever Outstanding Junior College Faculty Award.

    Janice retired from Jefferson State Community College in 2010 after 38 years of service. A long-time supporter of Birmingham’s arts scene, Janice is a docent for the Birmingham Museum of Art and leads tours of the museum. As a lay member of the Board of the American Pulmonology Medicine Institute, she helps promote scholarship programs for medical students. Since retirement, Janice has indulged her love of travel and has visited six of the seven continents. In her down time, she enjoys playing bridge and spending time with her family, especially her great nieces and nephews.

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Dr. Vithal Ghanta

    In 1986, Dr. Vithal Ghanta joined the Department of Biology as an Associate Professor, making her the department’s first female tenured faculty member. In 1989, she was promoted to full professor. Dr. Ghanta has spent the past 33 years advancing the department’s research and teaching.

    First Female Tenured Faculty Member

    In 1986, Dr. Vithal Ghanta joined the Department of Biology as an Associate Professor, making her the department’s first female tenured faculty member. In 1989, she was promoted to full professor. Dr. Ghanta has spent the past 33 years advancing the department’s research and teaching.

    Prior to joining the Department of Biology, Dr. Ghanta worked in the Department of Microbiology for 15 years as a postdoctoral fellow and an Assistant Professor researching immunology and cancer in mouse models. Over the span of her career, Dr. Ghanta’s research has primarily focused on tumor immunology, the immunology of aging, and regulation of the immune system by the central nervous system. Several years ago, she ceased her research efforts to focus on teaching.

    Since her early days in the department, Dr. Ghanta has been a staple in our classrooms, teaching courses such as Immunology, Biology of Aging, and Evolutionary Medicine. She is known and beloved by many students, going above and beyond to help them grow—not just as students, but as people. One student says, “Dr. Ghanta is a fantastic professor. She consistently makes herself available for questions and goes out of her way to ensure students understand the material if they approach her. She has definitely become one of my favorite teachers at UAB.”

    After almost 50 years at UAB and more than 30 years in the Department of Biology, Dr. Ghanta reflects back on her career with affection. She has cherished her time at UAB and says she is appreciative to have worked in a unified department with colleagues who were always supportive, respectful, friendly, and caring. Outside of work, Dr. Ghanta can be found tending to her garden and spending time with her husband of 43 years, Dr. Subbarao Vadlamudi.

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  • Pioneering Women in UAB Biology: Mary Shepherd

    In June 1970, Mary Shepherd received her diploma from UAB, making her the first woman to ever graduate with a bachelor’s degree from the Department of Biology!

    First Woman to Graduate with a Bachelor’s Degree

    After graduating from Birmingham’s Samuel Ullman High School (known today as UAB’s Ullman-Bell Complex), Mary Shepherd packed up her belongings and headed to Tuskegee University to pursue a degree in the sciences. During her junior year of college, she found out she was eligible to attend a state-supported school due to her husband’s status as a disabled veteran. In 1969, Mary and her husband moved back to Birmingham, and Mary transferred to UAB for her senior year. Adapting to UAB’s environment and academic requirements proved challenging. Being one of only a few African-American women in the program, she felt isolated and excluded, a far cry from her experience at Tuskegee. When her professor, Dr. Charles Crispens, saw her struggling, he stepped in to offer support—something Mary says she will never forget. Dr. Crispens inspired her stay in the program and encouraged her to focus on her course work and matriculation. In June 1970, Mary received her diploma, making her the first woman to ever graduate with a bachelor’s degree from the Department of Biology!

    With her degree in hand, Mary had her heart set on teaching, so she returned to UAB to get a master’s degree in education. After receiving her certification, Mary spent 29 years teaching science in the Alabama public school system. Her longest tenure was at Hewitt-Trussville High School. In 2000, with her first grandchild on the way, Mary retired so that she could focus on her family. Nineteen years later, she and her husband are the proud grandparents of 10 grandkids. Outside of family time, Mary enjoys participating in her church, traveling, and serving her community.

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  • Eight students selected Fulbright Scholarship semifinalists

    Eight UAB students have been selected as semifinalists and one awarded for the Fulbright Scholarship Program.

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  • Seven UAB students receive top awards at Alabama Academy of Science competition

    Students receive recognition for research posters and papers at statewide presentation.

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  • 2019 NSF CAREER Award Training

    The UAB College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to again offer campus-wide training to junior faculty planning to apply for a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award.

    The UAB College of Arts and Sciences is pleased to again offer campus-wide training to junior faculty planning to apply for a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award. The NSF awards CAREER research grants to new faculty at universities who are at the rank of Assistant Professor (or equivalent) in any of the broad science and social science disciplines that are eligible for NSF grants.

    Training will be led by NSF CAREER awardee Dr. Eugenia Kharlampieva (Department of Chemistry), with support from current and previous awardees in multiple College of Arts and Sciences departments. The two-session training program will walk applicants through the process of applying for and winning prestigious CAREER Awards from the NSF. All UAB faculty members are invited to attend.

    Sessions will be held in Heritage Hall Room 500 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on April 5 and 19. The second session builds off knowledge from the first, so attendance at both sessions is recommended. Lunch will be provided.

    To assist with catering plans, please RSVP your intention to attend by Wednesday, March 25 to Veronica Speight at vspeight@uab.edu.

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  • Celebrate Women's History Month with the women who shape UAB

    From traveling to Antarctica to publishing children’s books, from taking biology educational tools to India to planting pollinator gardens on campus, women have been integral to shaping UAB’s reputation its 50-year history. As part of its annual coverage of Women’s History Month, the UAB Reporter has gathered examples of its more recent coverage of women at UAB.

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  • Experience a historic night with nationally recognized poet Nikki Giovanni

    UAB African American Studies will be sponsoring Nikki Giovanni at the Spring Colloquium, where she will share her poetry and advice as an educator and activist.

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  • Smith’s ‘How to Know the Flowers’ explores natural dyeing, healing processes

    English Instructor Jessica Smith wrote the book of poetry as she was leaving a job, helping a student learn to trust again, and discovering a new skill.  

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  • Madden-Lunsford’s new book pays homage to her ‘mountain mother’

    “Ernestine’s Milky Way” tells the story of a determined 5-year-old girl in the early 1940s, who sets off on a journey to deliver two Mason jars of milk to her neighbors in the holler.

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  • More than 1,160 employees to be honored during annual service awards

    More than 300 employees with 20-plus years of service to UAB will be honored March 1.

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  • Faculty save students $1.1 million on course materials

    By creating online assets in Canvas, using rental textbooks or older editions and seeking out free online resources, 17 UAB faculty, powered by AIM grants, have saved students more than $1.1 million on instructional materials.

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  • The Constant Gardeners

    Plant biologists dig for discoveries to protect crops worldwide
    Story by Brett Bralley • Photography by Steve Wood

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  • A Good Turn

    Molly Clay twists dyslexia into a drive to help others with disabilities
    Story by Alicia Rohan and Charles Buchanan • Photo/illustration by Steve Wood and Hagen Stegall

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  • Security Detail

    Blake Pritchett helps save the world through trade
    Story by Charles Buchanan • Photo courtesy of Blake Pritchett

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  • The Power of One

    Precision medicine unlocks the answers inside you
    By Matt Windsor and Charles Buchanan • Illustrations by Christopher Davis • Photos by Steve Wood • Web design by Tyler Bryant

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  • Casting the Net for Crooks

    Undergraduates fight on cybercrime’s front lines
    By Josh Beech

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