Copy of MOST Symposium Banner Final

  • What: Featuring the Meredith Kilgore Endowed Lecturer, Gbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH, this half-day hybrid symposium is designed to provide local and national attendees with a general overview, recent developments, and current projects regarding scientific methods to support health equity research.

    Who:
     This symposium will be of interest to researchers across the topical spectrum and who are at any career stage.

    When:
     Thursday, January 19, 2023, from 8am-12pm

    Where:
     The Edge of Chaos (1700 University Blvd, 4th Floor of Lister Hill Libary) with Hybrid Option

    2023 Sponsors: 

    Symposium Sponsors 2023 2

  • Registration is closed

  • 2023 Agenda

    • 8:00am - 9:00am

      Incorporating Photovoice into adolescent and young adult (AYA) social and behavioral health research
      Dione King, PhD
      University of Alabama at Birmingham

    • 9:00am - 10:00am

      Collective Well-being: A Framework to Improve Population Health
      Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS
      NYU Grossman School of Medicine

    • 10:00am - 1:000am

      Metrics for monitoring PrEP uptake: An equity-based approach
      Patrick Sullivan, DVM, PhD
      Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health

    • 11:00am - 12:00pm

      Having Impact Through Research: You See My Glory But You Don’t Know My Story

      Meredith Kilgore Endowed Lecturer
      Gbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH
      NYU Grossman School of Medicine

     

  • 2023 Speakers

    • Olugbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH
      Olugbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH

      Gbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH

      NYU Grossman School of Medicine

      Gbenga Ogedegbe, a physician, is Professor of Population Health & Medicine, Chief Division of Health & Behavior, and Director Center for Healthful Behavior Change at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Gbenga is a leading expert on health disparities research; his work focuses on the implementation of evidence-based interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction in minority populations. He is Principal Investigator on numerous NIH projects and has expanded his work globally to Sub-Saharan Africa where he is funded by the NIH to strengthen research capacity and reduce the burden of non-communicable diseases. He has co-authored over 250 publications and his work has been recognized by receipt of several research and mentoring awards including the prestigious John M. Eisenberg Excellence in Mentorship Award from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Daniel Savage Science Award. He has served on numerous scientific panels including the NIH, CDC, World Health Organization, and the European Union Research Council. Prior to joining NYU, he was faculty at Cornell Weill Medical School and Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

      Read more

    • Patrick Sullivan, DVM, PhD
      Patrick Sullivan, DVM, PhD

      Patrick Sullivan, DVM, PhD

      Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health

      Patrick Sullivan is the Charles Howard Candler Professor of Epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, and Co-Director of the Prevention Sciences Core at Emory’s Center for AIDS Research (CFAR). He has worked in HIV prevention for 26 years. Before coming to his current position at Emory, Patrick worked at CDC as an EIS officer and in HIV Surveillance programs.

      Dr. Sullivan’s research focuses on HIV among men who have sex with men, including behavioral research, interventions, implementation, and surveillance, and he is a PI in the UNC/Emory Adolescent Trials Network Center and a member of the HPTN SGM Scientific Committee.

      Read more

    • Dione King, PhD
      Dione King, PhD

      Dione King, PhD

      University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Dione King is an Associate Professor in the Department of Social Work at UAB's College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. King’s long-standing commitment to disadvantaged, vulnerable, and marginalized populations is evidenced through her professional and research experiences working with children and families in juvenile justice, child welfare, education, nonprofit, and homeless/transitional housing settings. Her research focuses on health behaviors and health disparities that impact the adolescent and young adult life experience including dating violence, delinquency, substance use, mental health, and sexual risk behaviors while giving attention to social determinants of health and the promotion of health behaviors.

      Dr. King lives by the motto, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” This quote taken directly from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 Letter from a Birmingham jail has resonated with her as a social worker and reflects the impact she seeks to make in the lives of individuals, families, communities, and systems.

      Read more

    • Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS
      Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS

      Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS

      NYU Grossman School of Medicine

      Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS is Associate Professor of Population Health and Medicine and Director of Community Health and Clinical Outcomes for Beyond Bridges.

      Dr. Roy is a clinician-investigator who uses epidemiology, complex systems modeling, and community-engaged approaches to investigate the effect of positive psychosocial factors on health outcomes at the individual, community, and clinic/health system levels. She co-authored an evidence-based, actionable, community-level theoretical framework defining and describing collective well-being and its drivers and outcomes. She works to implement programs and processes to improve health outcomes equitably across our health system and communities that we serve. Finally, Dr. Roy also enjoys teaching health professions students and internal medicine residents in the classroom while taking care of a diverse array of patients on the inpatient general medicine service.

      Read more

    2022 Speakers

    • Linda M. Collins, PhD
      Linda M. Collins, PhD

      Linda M. Collins, PhD

      NYU School of Global Public Health

      Linda M. Collins is Professor of Global Public Health in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Biostatistics. She earned her B.A. in Psychology at the University of Connecticut and her Ph.D. in Quantitative Psychology at the University of Southern California.

      Collins’ research interests are focused on the development, dissemination, and application of the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), a framework for the optimization of behavioral, biobehavioral, and social-structural interventions. The objective of MOST is to improve intervention effectiveness, efficiency, economy, and scalability. She is currently collaborating on research applying MOST in the areas of smoking cessation, the prevention of excessive drinking and risky sex in college students, and HIV services.

      Read more

    • Kate Guastaferro, PhD, MPH
      Kate Guastaferro, PhD, MPH

      Kate Guastaferro, PhD, MPH

      Penn State College of Health and Human Development

      Kate Guastaferro, Ph.D. is an Assistant Research Professor in the Center for Healthy Children, and an affiliate of the Child Maltreatment Solutions Network as well as the Edna Bennett Pierce Prevention Research Center, at The Pennsylvania State University. Kate’s program of research sits at the intersection of prevention science and innovative methods.

      Kate is committed to the prevention of child maltreatment. Her focus during her time at Penn State has focused predominantly on the prevention of child sexual abuse. Kate led the development of a parent-focused child sexual abuse prevention module designed to be added to existing evidence-based programs. She also collaborates with Dr. Jennie Noll on the implementation and evaluation of a state-wide child sexual abuse prevention strategy.

      She is also interested in innovative methods for intervention development, optimization, and evaluation. She is an expert in the multiphase optimization strategy (MOST), an engineering inspired framework for building interventions that are effective, efficient, economical, and scalable. Kate has experience applying MOST to a variety of public health problems, including STI prevention among first year college students.

      Kate received her PhD in Public Health from Georgia State University in 2016, receiving the Public Health Achievement Award recognizing her scholarship and academic success. She completed her undergraduate work at Boston University in 2008 and received her MPH from Georgia State in 2011. Kate’s vision is to integrate her substantive and methodological interests to develop, optimize, evaluate, and disseminate child maltreatment prevention programs that are effective, efficient, economical, and scalable.

      Read more

    • Drew Sayer, PhD
      Drew Sayer, PhD

      Drew Sayer, PhD

      The University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Dr. Sayer is Assistant Professor in the Department of Nutrition Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His clinical research relies heavily on the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) Framework and, in particular, the Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial (SMART) experimental approach. Using these approaches, Dr. Sayer is conducting 3 ongoing SMARTs with an overarching goal of developing effective, efficient, and personalized adaptive treatment strategies for improving the health and wellbeing of people with obesity.

      Read more

    • Rachel Wells, PhD, MSN, RN, CNL
      Rachel Wells, PhD, MSN, RN, CNL

      Rachel Wells, PhD, MSN, RN, CNL

      University of Alabama at Birmingham

      Dr. Rachel Wells is a NIH/NINR-funded (1K99NR019854) postdoctoral fellow at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing. She received a BS in Microbiology, English, and Latin/Greek (2006) from the University of Alabama and MSN (2010) and PhD (2019) in Nursing from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She has an extensive clinical background in critical care and adult cardiovascular health.

      Dr. Wells’ cardiovascular nursing practice, experiences in seeking specialty care as a rural dweller, and research experiences as a palliative nurse coordinator inspire her research interest in optimizing early palliative care models for under-resourced advanced heart failure patients and their family caregivers in the rural Deep South. She is interested in improving cardiovascular outcomes and pain management disparities and access to care for those living with advanced heart failure and other serious illness through innovative behavioral intervention development.

      Read more

  • For more information, please contact Amber Ganoe
    aganoe@uabmc.edu
  • 2023 Recordings:

    Incorporating Photovoice into adolescent and young adult (AYA) social and behavioral health research
    Dione King, PhD
    University of Alabama at Birmingham

    Collective Well-being: A Framework to Improve Population Health
    Brita Roy, MD, MPH, MHS
    NYU Grossman School of Medicine

    Metrics for monitoring PrEP uptake: An equity-based approach
    Patrick Sullivan, DVM, PhD
    Emory University, Rollins School of Public Health

    Having Impact Through Research: You See My Glory But You Don’t Know My Story
    Meredith Kilgore Endowed Lecturer
    Gbenga Ogedegbe, MD, MPH
    NYU Grossman School of Medicine