Displaying items by tag: department of physical medicine and rehabilitation

Pelvic floor therapy provides a conservative and holistic approach to pelvic floor dysfunction, but many women do not know about the treatment. JJ Fagen, UAB Medicine’s pelvic floor therapist, discusses the benefits of pelvic floor therapy and pelvic floor exercises
A TBI Model System is awarded based on demonstrated excellence in research and knowledge translation that promotes health and quality of life for people with TBI and their families.

This grant adds to 50 years of continuous funding for UAB’s Spinal Cord Injury Model System. With this grant, UAB will conduct research on how bowel function and metabolic health are affected by spinal cord injury and better understand how quickly this change happens and how long it may continue.

In these roles, Nguyen will continue working to improve function and quality of life for people with disabilities.
UAB Medicine will provide sideline physicians, preseason and postseason player physicals, mental health services, nutritionist consultations, clinical services, an employee health database and other services.

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation’s Yu-ying Chen, M.D., Ph.D., is being recognized for her research in spinal cord injuries. 

An independent life for spina bifida patients is still possible, thanks to programs like the UAB Transitional Spina Bifida Clinic.

UAB clinical psychiatrist Megan Hays walks through five strategies that can be used to manage pandemic anger and burnout. 

Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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UAB’s Rachel Cowan, Ph.D., explains how to assist a disabled neighbor in the event of dangerous weather. 

Vu Nguyen, M.D., MBA, will be the new chair for UAB’s Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, effective Jan. 1, 2022.

UAB’s Megan Hays, Ph.D., shares how to overcome common negative thinking traps by using cognitive behavioral therapy.
Arnoldo Vasquez Hernandez was pinned under an oak tree that fell on his house during a tornado in January 2021, requiring a rare, in-the-field amputation. After being fitted for a prosthetic leg, he is now able to take his first steps in nearly five months.
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