Displaying items by tag: department of pediatrics

The Zorro-Flow Inc. is the newest startup from the UAB Harbert Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship. The device is the first external catheter to collect urine effectively, safely and comfortably from critically ill female neonates and children.
Noninvasive ventilation is possible in infants at limits of viability. But unlike in slightly older preterm infants, noninvasive ventilation did not show an advantage in infants of 22 weeks-0 days to 23 weeks-6 days gestational age.
Implementing a consistent and simple routine can help with a smooth transition into a new school year and alleviate stress and anxiety in children and adolescents.
Car seats are documented to reduce injuries and deaths in children but are effective only if installed and used properly.
The Pediatric Pandemic Network will coordinate in future efforts to ensure that local and national responses to pandemics and disasters properly address the needs of children, adolescents and families.
Results published in the New England Journal of Medicine show the adenovirus was a common finding among nine pediatric hepatitis cases found in Alabama from October 2021 to February 2022. While adenovirus was identified in the blood of all nine hepatitis cases, causation has not been proved, and the role of adenovirus infection itself in this outbreak remains unclear.  
As the summer temperatures increase, so does the risk of heat-related illness and death. A UAB pediatrician shares best practices for parents to prevent child hot car deaths.
As parents navigate baby formula shortages across the nation, one UAB pediatrician shares advice and concerns that parents should keep in mind.
Based on information out of UAB and the ADPH, the CDC issued a health alert encouraging providers presented with pediatric patients with hepatitis of an unknown origin to screen for the adenovirus-41 strain.
UAB Medicine’s STEP program helps people with disabilities as they transition from pediatric health care to adult health care.
COVID-related acute kidney injury peaked in 10- to 15-year-olds and 70- to 75-year-olds, suggesting age is not the sole determinant in severity of illness from COVID-19.
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