Displaying items by tag: division of maternal fetal medicine

UAB women’s health experts found that prophylactic anticoagulation guidelines did not reduce risk of venous thromboembolisms but did increase the risk for bleeding complications in the general obstetric population.
UAB-led national study shows using blood pressure medication to treat pregnant women with chronic hypertension improves pregnancy outcomes, including a decrease in severe preeclampsia and preterm birth.
UAB maternal-fetal medicine specialists partner with the DCH Health System to provide specialized care for high-risk pregnancy patients in West Alabama.
Consortium led by UAB researchers in the UAB Heersink School of Medicine and School of Public Health received additional funding to further study chronic hypertension and preeclampsia epigenetics participants enrolled in the CHAP trial.
Death or severe brain bleeding in the first week after birth dropped from 27.4 percent to 15 percent after introduction of a bundle of evidence-based, potentially better practices for preterm infants. Median weight of the 820 infants studied was 1 pound, 10 ounces.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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The genetic counseling field has become an important component of medicine in the past decade. Alabama law now mandates all genetic counselors practicing in the state be licensed by fall of 2021.
In October 2020, amid a global pandemic, the UAB Comprehensive Transplant Institute launched the Southeast’s first uterus transplant program — only the fourth of its kind in the United States.
Researchers from UAB are working with the NIH and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to study a potential antibiotic to treat maternal and infant sepsis in low-income countries.
For mothers with substance abuse disorders, UAB is helping to provide crucial care for them and their child.
In light of new study results, guidelines for early gestational diabetes screening in obese pregnant women will need reassessment.
Women who delay pushing during labor face higher risks for infection and bleeding without reducing the likelihood of having a cesarean delivery.
A UAB maternal-fetal specialist led a secondary analysis to determine factors relating to frequency of C-sections across 25 American hospitals.
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