Displaying items by tag: neuroscience

Examination of a larger group of patients extends the clinical manifestations first described 11 years ago.
UAB was part of a national, multisite study that showed a drug for multiple sclerosis was effective in slowing down brain atrophy, or shrinkage.
The goal is an early warning system to block incipient seizures for patients where medications have failed.
UAB research suggests protein misfolding, perhaps caused by a reduction in a regulatory protein, could be associated with Parkinson’s disease.
These newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus become less excitable after three weeks, a crucial step for mature functioning.
Early results for a UAB-developed viral immunotherapy to treat brain tumors in children demonstrate safety and tolerability in Phase I studies.
A neuron model of Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementias shows defects that could suggest treatments to halt or reverse cognitive impairments before the neurons die.

Constraint-Induced Therapy, developed as a rehabilitation technique following stroke, appears beneficial for patients with multiple sclerosis, according to new findings from UAB.

UAB, home of one of four McKnight Brain Institutes, hosted the group’s annual inter-institutional meeting in April.
A business officer in the UAB Dept. of Neurosurgery becomes a patient when co-workers diagnose a blood clot in his brain.
The award honors his distinguished contributions to neuroscience, particularly for discovery of gliotransmission.
UAB will examine cognitive behavior therapy, a form of psychotherapy, that may help reduce the severity of non-epileptic seizures induced by traumatic brain injury.
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