Displaying items by tag: uab medicine

Approximately 136 blocks were completed by members of the community through sewing days. This year’s theme is the 50th anniversary of the Loving v. Virginia U.S. Supreme Court ruling.
Authors conclude that the relationship between the complexity of left main coronary artery disease and clinical outcomes varies over time and lay out approaches for individualized strategy of revascularization.
The interdisciplinary approach aims to accelerate clinical innovation by training STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — students and clinicians to collaborate.
A photojournalist turned U.S. Army nurse is a shining example of nursing school’s commitment to providing quality health care for veterans.
One of the most common types of cancer is skin cancer. A UAB dermatologist shares background information, risks and how to protect your skin.
Ashley Hodges, Ph.D., has served in many leadership roles over the course of her 27-year nursing career, and her leadership in nursing extends to daughter, son.
UAB neurosurgery’s commitment to quality care is reflected in outcomes that beat national averages in key measurements.
Take a night to celebrate and embrace some of the hardest-working people in health care.
Advances in brain imaging allowing early detection of the plaques implicated in Alzheimer’s disease have pushed prevention strategies in the fight against dementia.

Unusual case of teen patient diagnosed with colorectal cancer receives innovative first-in-human clinical trial at UAB, reflecting a unique story of cancer and hope.

The Alabama Organ Center will co-host the event and help those who attend learn more about organ donation, as well as register anyone interested in becoming a donor upon death.
The new UAB Medicine Telehealth team of Bart Kelly and Eric Wallace aim to steadily grow telehealth providers across the UAB health care spectrum “one program at a time.”

Becker’s Hospital Review again names UAB Medicine as one of the 150 great places to work in health care.

Some people inherit a condition that elevates their cholesterol to an excessive degree, and no amount of diet or exercise can bring the numbers down. UAB researchers are developing and testing a new peptide that may lead to better treatment options.
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