Displaying items by tag: department of otolaryngology

The biodegradable nanovehicles accumulated in human breast cancer tumors in mice after systemic injection, and they inhibited oncogene expression and extended survival of the mice.
The ALA Award is a mark of recognition and esteem for outstanding achievement.
This innovative procedure provides qualifying otology patients with a less invasive treatment option than traditional ear surgery.
According to the Alabama Department of Public Health, Alabama ranks fifth in the United States for oral cavity and pharynx cancer incidence and seventh among the states for oral cavity and pharynx cancer deaths.
Thyroid nodules are not usually cancerous, but can cause pain and discomfort, as well as thyroid complications.
UAB’s Jessica Grayson, M.D., clears the confusion on how to tell COVID-19 from other respiratory illnesses.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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The Delta variant poses a new threat to pregnant women. UAB women’s health and infectious disease experts discuss the effects of COVID-19 and the vaccines on pregnancy.   

The National Cancer Institute awarded Jason Warram, Ph.D., $2.7 million for his research project using disease-targeted fluorescent antibodies to better guide surgeons and pathologists during oncologic surgery.
Masking can prevent more than COVID-19 from spreading this spring: Allergic rhinitis symptoms have shown to be significantly reduced with facemask usage during the pandemic.
The OHDRC Pilot Program facilitates emerging research ideas, explores new methodologies and approaches and facilitates transdisciplinary research as it relates to obesity-related health disparities.
A rare brain tumor caused facial paralysis for a local award-winning theater actress, but thanks to UAB doctors she is ready to get back on stage.
Many individuals with hearing impairment, no matter the degree, use some degree of lip-reading while communicating.
UAB’s Jessica Grayson, M.D., digs deeper into the mysterious phenomenon of losing your sense of smell after becoming infected with COVID-19.
Kenny Mayfield lost his sense of smell in early March. Months later, it still has not returned, a side effect of COVID-19 that he is working to regain.
Research suggests categorizing sinus conditions by inflammatory subtypes of chronic rhinosinusitis can lead to improved delivery and effectiveness of treatment.
Patrick and Myra Perault have struggled with sleep apnea most of their lives, but thanks to UAB doctors, restless nights are now a thing of the past.
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