Displaying items by tag: department of neurology

With the number of Americans with dementia expected to increase dramatically, UAB’s new brain health clinics point the way to improving brain health over a lifespan.
Adeel Memon will be the first graduate of the UAB neuroengineering Ph.D. program during the 2022 spring graduate commencement ceremony on April 29.
The investigational drug masitinib appears to inhibit parts of the immune system that may be overactive in ALS.
The fields of neuroengineering and brain-computer interfaces could have a tremendous impact on a number of neurologic conditions, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease, dementia and other brain diseases.
Consortium led by UAB researchers in the UAB Heersink School of Medicine and School of Public Health received additional funding to further study chronic hypertension and preeclampsia epigenetics participants enrolled in the CHAP trial.
Modeled on the state’s trauma system, the Alabama Statewide Stroke System will help improve emergency response for stroke patients.

The PPMI study is looking for biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease, which would help identify those at risk and track the progression of the disease.

Recent studies have shown that formal exercise training can help boost memory, and memory deficit is relatively common in people with epilepsy.

The grant links researchers from different disciplines, institutions and locations to study basic mechanisms that contribute to Parkinson’s disease.

UAB’s Standaert elected vice president of a leading neurological professional organization.

The new grant links UAB researchers with colleagues at two other institutions to search for ways to advance therapies from bench to bedside.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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Limiting neuroinflammation may represent a promising new approach to treat neurological diseases driven by neuroinflammation, such as stroke, spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.

Pharmacogenomics has become a valuable tool for optimizing treatments and is poised to play an increasing role in clinical care.

UAB is participating in a nationwide study to treat clinically depressed patients with a VNS device — originally created for treatment of seizure disorders.
New results suggest the answer is no, implying that the role of tau in the pathogenesis of Lewy body dementias is distinct from Alzheimer’s disease.

The first new medication for Alzheimer’s disease in almost 20 years seems to reduce the amount of amyloid peptide in the brain, which may slow the progression of the disease.

Physicians treating heart disease with anti-coagulants should factor the presence of kidney disease into their decisions on medications.
The University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Dr. Michelle Gray has been elected to be a member on the Scientific Board of the Hereditary Disease Foundation.
The Gwen Claussen, M.D., ALS Research Fund was created to provide research opportunities for undergraduate students in the neurosciences.
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