Displaying items by tag: oneal comprehensive cancer center

UAB O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center, Morehouse School of Medicine and Tuskegee University collectively receive $18 million U54 grant from the National Cancer Institute.

A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer is devastating. But with the help of UAB, Steve Young is now cancer-free.

The largest registry of U.S. children with cancer who were diagnosed with COVID-19 found an increased risk of having severe infection and having their cancer therapy modified because of COVID, underscoring the urgency of vaccinations for these children, the authors say.

Young cancer survivors are at higher risk of developing subsequent HPV-related cancers than the general population, but less likely to receive the HPV vaccine. Findings from the first clinical trial of its kind support making HPV vaccination a routine part of oncologic care for all young cancer survivors, researchers say.

Treating blood disorders and cancers cannot be done alone. It requires the strong will of a patient, the support of family, and the compassion and expertise of a world-renowned health care team, like those with the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB’s Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy program.
Preclinical experiments show how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, using two investigational new drugs that are permitted for human use. Physicians could immediately start investigational research in patients to test the effectiveness of this personalized approach.

Join UAB’s Dr. Mona Fouad to hear a discussion on implicit and explicit bias in the field of science and medicine. 

Because the beam of photons is so tightly focused, proton therapy has little effect on surrounding healthy tissue, making it especially beneficial for young patients.
The new grant links UAB researchers with colleagues at two other institutions to search for ways to advance therapies from bench to bedside.
The O’Neal Invests program funds UAB investigators starting new cancer-related projects to initiate key, preliminary work needed to enable competitive R01 applications from the NIH.

Blood and marrow transplantation strategies have changed significantly over the past four decades; but recipients still experience excess mortality that translates into 8.7 years of life lost, according to researchers in UAB’s Institute for Cancer Outcomes and Survivorship.

Limiting neuroinflammation may represent a promising new approach to treat neurological diseases driven by neuroinflammation, such as stroke, spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain.

This finding upends the long-held paradigm that priming during lung infections takes place only in the draining lymph nodes, and it will be key to developing more efficient vaccinations and therapies for respiratory challenges.

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