Research - News
UAB contributes data as part of the Alabama Autism Surveillance project, led by School of Public Health Associate Professor Martha Wingate, Dr.PH
Two endocrinology societies, under the direction of a UAB obesity expert, have laid out an action plan to tackle the nation’s obesity epidemic.
National Public Health Week presents an opportunity for public health and clinical health professionals to help individuals and communities navigate the changing world of public health.
A grant for up to $35 million over five years has helped form the Antiviral Drug Discovery and Development Center.
Experts from UAB and other leading institutions will discuss mood disorders and suicide at an April symposium.
Two student R&D projects at UAB attract international attention.
The UAB Excellence in Business Top 25 award program identifies, recognizes and celebrates the success of the top 25 businesses owned or operated by UAB alumni.
Three-year, $2 million PCORI grant will randomize 500 patients in a clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a medication adherence intervention delivered by a community health worker.
Brain scans dispel assumptions about Internet safety, as well as show that critical-thinking skills and impulsivity are at work as users identify spam and phishing sites.
Repeating easy passwords can leave users vulnerable, but new UAB research offers increased sophistication and ease with a second security factor.
UAB joins four other research universities as the most recent recipients of national education grant to address the shortage of highly trained STEM teachers in Alabama and beyond.
A new study from the UAB School of Public Health suggests that hallucinogens may help reduce criminal recidivism.
In October, UAB kicked off the walking bus program for adults, the first of its kind. The first paper associated with this project was published in the Open Journal of Preventive Medicine.
The UAB Department of Ophthalmology has been awarded a grant to support research into the causes, treatment and prevention of blinding diseases.

Seed funding generates major UAB research projects geared toward treating lung injury from chemical attacks

An interdisciplinary collaboration at UAB recently established a research method that has expanded the institution’s capacity to expand initiatives addressing diseases including cancer, autoimmune diseases and degenerative diseases.
Gary Warner is an expert in phishing attacks and international cybersecurity fraud.
Seniors who undergo cognitive training show increased and sustained capabilities for reasoning and speed of processing.
The annual summit explores new and ongoing threats to cybersecurity and potential safeguards against them.
After the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, invertebrates like shrimp, oysters and crabs were the subject of the majority of testing by federal and state agencies. One UAB expert analyzed fish caught a year after the spill to determine safety.
UAB researchers say that antibiotics continue to be inappropriately used in emergency rooms despite worries over antibiotic resistance.
The UAB SPIES Lab research on two facets of user-centered Internet security will be presented at the Network and Distributed Systems Security Symposium.
Early registration ends Jan. 31 for The Bruce A. Harris Symposium: Progress in OB/GYN 2014 for Physicians and Nurses to be held 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Feb. 20-21 in The Wynfrey Hotel at Riverchase Galleria.
UAB health policy experts recently completed a survey of 601 Alabama residents on issues of the ACA, the Exchange and Medicaid expansion.
Newfound details of rare disease may advance understanding of brain tumors.
Gel form of a medication for Parkinson’s disease speeds response time over traditional pills.
A genetic variant that shapes each person’s immune response contributes to the chances of developing autoimmune disease.
Change in key protein unleashes natural defense against major kidney disease mechanism.
A UAB study shows early maturing in adolescent girls can increase aggressive and delinquent behavior.
REGARDS investigators have responded with a letter published in the AHA journal Circulation, saying it is premature to draw firm conclusions about potential overestimation of risk using the new risk formula.
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