Welcome to UAB Obstetrics and Gynecology, a department of the University of Alabama School of Medicine at UAB.  Since its establishment in 1945, the UAB Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology has been dedicated to the highest quality clinical, research and training programs.  The department has grown into a national leader in obstetrics and gynecology, with innovative educational programs, groundbreaking research initiatives and a robust clinical practice.

DeborahDixonDeborah Dixon Honored as OB/GYN’s July Employee of the Month

With a beautiful smile and a pleasant personality, Deborah Dixon graces the halls of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) clinic. The sentiment is that she is a staple in the team - “Like the glue that holds this unit together,” said co-worker Rebecca Ellison. It is therefore no surprise that she was nominated and chosen as the OB/GYN July Employee of the Month.

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holly richterThe American Urogynecologic Society and the International Urogynecological Association have honored the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology for work in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development-sponsored Pelvic Floor Disorders Network, with the 2014 Best Paper in Basic Science award.

The award is given annually and was presented at the AUGS/IUGA Scientific Meeting.
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TitaThe University of Alabama at BirminghamDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Department of Biostatistics have been awarded a $19.31 million R01 grant by the National Institutes of Health’s Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to coordinate the most comprehensive study of chronic hypertension in pregnancy ever undertaken.

The Chronic Hypertension and Pregnancy Project (CHAP) is a multicenter, randomized trial which will enroll between 4,700 and 5,700 pregnant women during the next six years with a primary aim to evaluate the benefits and potential harms of pharmacologic treatment of mild chronic hypertension in pregnancy, a decades-old question that has remained unanswered.  Read more ...

Rodney Edwards 300As a baby slides out of the birth canal, on the way to its first breath, its body becomes coated in its mother's microbes. This first interaction with outside organisms could be key to shaping the development of the baby's immune system.

Our microbes, collectively called the microbiome, most often live in harmony with our bodies. They support the immune system, help to digest food and keep the metabolism on track, and fight off disease-causing bacteria. But researchers suspect that mom's microbiome could play a role in when her children are born, and what happens to them as they grow.  Read more ...