Displaying items by tag: division of molecular and cellular pathology

These changes, seen in a mouse model, are a likely proteome signature for reductive stress cardiomyopathy. About one in six heart failure patients shows reductive stress, according to a 2018 clinical study.
To facilitate gene-level queries of data from more than 10,000 cancer patient transcriptome sequences and proteomics data from 2,000 patients, researchers have developed a user-friendly cancer data analysis web platform called UALCAN.

After years of researching the SON gene, Erin Eun-Young Ahn, Ph.D., may have found the cause behind an extremely rare disease. 

The drug Vismodegib, tested in a breast cancer model, is an inhibitor of hedgehog signaling, a form of cell communication manipulated by the tumor microenvironment.
Elizabeth Brown, Ph.D., has received a $3.1 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study epigenetic contribution to the excess risk of a precursor of multiple myeloma in African Americans.
Altered epigenetic marks on ribosomal RNAs appear to create a pool of specialized ribosomes that can differentially regulate translation of specific messenger RNA.
UAB researchers have identified a subgroup of heart failure patients with reductive stress who may be less responsive or even harmed by antioxidants, which could lead to personalized treatment and better outcomes.
Mitochondrial DNA determines oxidant levels and may further explain why some people get sick and others don’t.