Displaying items by tag: department of radiology

The facility will produce a reliable supply of isotopes for the United States Department of Energy Isotope Program.
Preclinical experiments show how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, using two investigational new drugs that are permitted for human use. Physicians could immediately start investigational research in patients to test the effectiveness of this personalized approach.
The new technology allows health care personnel to observe movement of the lungs, diaphragm and joints.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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Adaptive radiation therapy allows for more precise treatment by fine-tuning the treatment regimen based on up-to-date imaging.
Researchers find a role for citrullinated vimentin as a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, or DAMP, that is generated by lung macrophages in response to environmental cadmium/carbon black.
If these hollow capsules are modified to target a solid tumor, PET imaging and therapeutic ultrasound can be used to rupture them and release an anticancer drug at ground zero.
In advance of public vaccination, a quick and accurate COVID-19 antibody test will help determine the presence of neutralizing antibodies, the molecules that aid in protection against the virus.
The O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center at UAB is recruiting Alabama women who have never had breast cancer for the study, to test a personalized approach to breast cancer screening.
A local early-stage startup has been approved for low-cost, low-risk, non-invasive procedures for patients with chronic liver disease.
Benjamin Larimer, Ph.D., has received a $1.5 million award to conduct research on a PET-based diagnostic tool that could identify patients who will respond to immunotherapy.
An O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center scientist presents at a major oncology meeting about a novel artificial intelligence software tool to assist evaluating tumor response in advanced cancers.
The procedure takes 30-45 minutes, and the patient is able to go home a few hours after it is over.
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