• ‘Resistance can be fun’



    Angela Davis speaks on activism, recent events surrounding her human rights award




    PHOTO BY AMY LAWHON/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
    angela davis

    Angela Davis answers questions at a press conference on February 16 at Tuggle Elementary.




    Myles Womack
    CityLifestyle Editor
    mjw3@uab.edu


    Controversy has followed Angela Davis, civil rights activist and academic, for nearly her entire adult life.  Over the past month, activists in the Birmingham community organized a sold out event giving Davis the opportunity to respond to the decisions made by the board of directors of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI). 

    On Saturday, Feb 16, the Birmingham Committee of Truth and Reconciliation hosted, “A Conversation with Dr. Angela Davis” at the Boutwell Auditorium.

    The event was announced back in early January as an alternative honor ceremony after the BCRI originally rescinded the Fred Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award. The BCRI re-invited Davis back again in late January.   Earlier in the day, for the first time since the events of the past several weeks have unfolded, Davis spoke publicly on the issue in a press conference held at Tuggle Elementary, the school at which she attended as a youth.  

    “It’s important that we recognize that no communities are homogeneous,” Davis said. “There are political differences in black communities and I think that what was damaging to the history of the involvement of Jewish people in progressive struggles was what happened with true award.”  

    Davis said the BCRI has still yet to give an explanation behind why the award was first rescinded or later why that decision has been repealed.  

    “If I accept the award it would be a good move to engage in conversations about the issues [regarding the decision to rescind the award],” Davis said. 

    Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University discussed several topics with Davis. 

    “I will never love Birmingham as much as I love Birmingham this moment,” Davis said.  

    During the conversation, Davis further elaborated on her reaction to the BCRI’s decision.  

    “Reverend Shuttlesworth has always been one of my heroes,” Davis said. “I have always admired those especially Odessa Woolfolk who lead to the creation of the institute.”  

    Davis said that she was first “overcome with joy” upon hearing the news of the Civil Rights Institute’s award and then was “surprised” after the rescission.  

    “It became clear to me that this might be a teachable moment,” Davis said. “As much as the whole controversy might have at least for the moment damaged the reputation of those who made that decision that we might seize this moment to reflect on what it means to live in this climate of the 21st century.”  

    Davis also touched on her scholastic career, her role in Palestinian rights, prison reformation and her upbringing in Birmingham.  

    “Those of you who know the history of Birmingham know that Center Street divided the black neighborhood from the area that was zoned for white people,” said Davis. “You know about the bombs that happened on the other side of Center Street.” 




    PHOTO BY KRISTINA BALCIUNAITE/EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
    angela davis line

    Attendee line stretches from Boutwell Auditorium around the corner to 19th St N.





    Davis said as kids her friends would play a game were they would dare each other to run across the street and run on the porch then ring the door of a white family in the East Thomas neighborhood she was raised in. 

    “It was fun,” Davis said. “One of things that I learned growing up in Birmingham is that resistance can be fun. It can bring us pleasure and joy.”  

    Davis has yet to respond to the BCRI or accepting the offer a second time.  

    “I don’t want to do anything to damage the reputation of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute,” Davis said.

  • A vintage voyage


    Photo by Amy Lawhon/Staff Photographer
    IMG 9855
    Manitou Supply owners Luciana Giovinazzo and David Brown, in addition to selling vintage items, host monthly events open to everyone at their store.


    As older pieces of clothing, shoes and accessories make a comeback, local stores in Birmingham offer spots for classic trends. As older pieces of clothing, shoes and accessories make a comeback, local stores in Birmingham offer spots for classic trends. 

    Manitou Supply is a vintage clothing store that has a collection of outfits and accessories for various styles and occasions.  


    “We have a curated selection of 70s, 80s and 90s casual apparel, including a nice collection of vintage denim pieces,” Luciana Giovinazzo said, co-owner of Manitou Supply. “We also carry some modern items, such as designer toys, bags and handmade jewelry.”  


    This past weekend Manitou featured one of its many events located in its shop in the MAKEbhm space, located on 4000 3rd Ave S. 


    “We have a wall dedicated to art, where we feature a different artist every month, with an opening night event,” Giovinazzo said. “We also do vintage markets, pop-ups and more.” 

    David Brown, co-owner of Manitou, first opened the store on Etsy in 2009. 

    “You can come to shop, or just hang out and see some of the art on our walls,” said Brown, “We truly enjoy being able to promote our own aesthetic voice and outsider fashion and design interests. It’s a blast.” 

    Brown, who was born and grew up in Birmingham said he feels that they are a part of “a new wave of artistic entrepreneurship” in Birmingham.  

    “I think it’s a trend that is growing pretty fast now, especially among college students,” said Giovinazzo, “But older people also know how to appreciate vintage, especially if it’s a piece they remember from their childhood, like David and I do.”  


    Zoe’s in Forest Park, located on 3900 Clairmont Ave S, has a wide selection of vintage clothing for women’s fashion, costume design and accessories.  


    “We have clothing from the 30’s and 40’s to the 80’s, 90’s and 2000’s,” said Jackie Folk, store volunteer. “We also have a lot of soft, gently worn clothing. We have a small selection for guys but we do have cool and funky t-shirts and jackets.” 

    Folk said that the store has a large selection of Halloween costume inspired items as well. 


    Chris Smoot, owner of Memory Lane, offers vintage clothing that is focused on sports, television and pop culture.  

    “Space Jam was my favorite movie growing up so mostly everything even the store’s logo is Space Jam themed,” said Smoot.  Smoot, whose hometown is Bessemer, wants to provide “affordable” prices for younger people that may not be able to buy the more expensive pieces of clothing and shoes.  


    “I don’t see it [vintage clothing] going anywhere because everything is already old,” said Smoot.



    PHOTO COURTESY BY MEMORY LANE
    IMG 1146
    Memory Lane specializes in sporty and pop culture items, with 



    Photo by Amy Lawhon/Staff Photographer
    IMG 9895
    Manitou Supply collects colorful and playful vintage items to sell.


    Photo by Amy Lawhon/Staff Photographer
    IMG 9880

  • Abortion is a right



    ILLUSTRATIONS BY JOHN HILLER/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR
    Clinic Infographic





    Katie 41

    Katie Kyle
    Opinion Columnist
    katiek11@uab.edu



    Alabama has a distinct history of violence when it comes to abortion. In 1993, an anti-abortion activist shot and killed Alabama physician David Gunn, M.D., who became the first doctor in the nation to be murdered for performing abortions.  Twenty years ago, Birmingham was the site of the first fatal bombing of an abortion clinic in the United States, in which an off-duty police officer was killed and a nurse critically injured. 

    For many women, obtaining an abortion in Alabama may be more difficult than imagined, as state legislation continues to restrict the practice in an attempt to limit access. In 2001, there were twelve abortion clinics in the state of Alabama. Due to excessive restrictions, the number has dwindled over the years, and today, there are only five facilities in Alabama that perform abortions.  They are located in Tuscaloosa, Huntsville, Montgomery, Birmingham and Mobile.

    Guttmacher Institute found that 93 percent of Alabama counties had no clinics in 2017, resulting in diminished access for the 59 percent of Alabama women that live there. Alabama has tried several times to limit access to abortion by placing severe restrictions on clinics and physicians. For example, the Women’s Health and Safety Act of 2013 required physicians to have admitting privileges at a hospital in the same “metropolitan statistical area” as the clinic.  

    The requirement would have shut down the only abortion clinics in Montgomery, Mobile and Birmingham. A federal judge struck down the legislation in 2014 on the grounds that it was unconstitutional and imposed an “undue burden” on women seeking abortion services. The law also stated that abortion facilities located within 2,000 feet of a public K-8 school were not eligible to receive a license or renew an existing license.  

    The bill was intended to close the Tuscaloosa and Huntsville locations, which performed more than half of the abortions in the state in 2014, according to the Alabama Department of Public Health. These targeted restrictions on abortion providers, often referred to as TRAP laws, are medically unnecessary.

    According to the Committee on Health Care for Underserved Women of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), “legislative restrictions fundamentally interfere with the patient-provider relationship and decrease access to abortion for all women, and particularly for low-income women and those living long distances from health care providers.”  But Alabama lawmakers continue to interfere with women’s fundamental right to access abortion, which was guaranteed by the Supreme Court’s ruling in Roe v. Wade in 1973. Last November, Alabama amended its constitution by passing Amendment 2, which was supported by 59 percent of voters, according to Ballotpedia.  

    The Amendment sent a clear message: Alabama’s state policy is to “recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, including the right to life.” It also states that the law does not recognize a right to an abortion or require funding of abortions.  In 2014, the mandatory waiting period to receive an abortion was increased from 24 to 48 hours. One bill proposed to ban abortions if a fetal heartbeat is detected, which can occur as early as six weeks, but was fortunately struck down.  

    This interference is outrageous and needs to stop. Morally, individuals have the right to reach their own conclusions about the practice of abortion. But religious and moral objections do not change the law. Legally, the issue is very plain.  Abortion is a fundamental right afforded by the Constitution, and the personal views of Alabama lawmakers should not dictate women’s access to abortion services.



  • Angela Davis speaks at Boutwell Stadium




    Photo by Amy Lawhon/Staff Photographer
    5z9a4736
    Angela Davis, social activist and Birmingham native, at press conference at Tuggle Elementary on Saturday, February 16.


    Myles Womack
    CItyLifestyle Editor
    mjw3@uab.edu


    On Saturday, February 16, the Birmingham Committee of Truth and Reconciliation hosted, “A Conversation with Dr. Angela Davis” at the Boutwell Auditorium. 

    The event was announced back in early January as an alternative honor ceremony after the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI) originally rescinded the Fred Shuttlesworth Human Rights Award. The BCRI re-invited Davis back again in late January. 

    “It’s important that we recognize that no communities are homogeneous,” Davis said. “There are political differences in black communities and I think that what was damaging to the history of the involvement of Jewish people in progressive struggles was what happened with true award.”

    Earlier the day, for the first time since the events of the past several weeks had unfolded, Davis spoke publicly on the issue in a press conference held at Tuggle Elementary, the school at which she attended as a youth.

    Davis said the BCRI has still yet to give an explanation behind why the award was first rescinded or later why that decision has been repealed.

    “If I accept the award it would be a good move to engage in conversations about the issues [regarding the decision to rescind the award],” Davis said.

    Dr. Imani Perry, the Hughes-Rogers Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University discussed several topics with Davis.

    “I will never love Birmingham as much as I love Birmingham this moment,” Davis said.

    During the conversation, Davis further elaborated on her reaction to the BCRI’s decision. 

    Davis said that she was first “overcome with joy” upon hearing the news of the Civil Rights Institute’s award and then was “surprised” after the rescission. 


    Davis also touched on her scholastic career, her role in Palestinian rights, prison reformation and her upbringing in Birmingham. 

    Davis has yet to respond to the BCRI or accepting the offer a second time.

    “I don’t want to do anything to damage the reputation of the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute,” Davis said.

  • Sanders campaigned for a packed-out Bartow on Monday, Jan. 18. (Photo by Johnathon Patrick).Sanders campaigned for a packed-out Bartow on Monday, Jan. 18. (Photo by Johnathon Patrick).Gregory Williams - Contributing Writer
    gwill626@uab.edu

    Lines stretched around the Boutwell Auditorium last Monday evening as supporters and skeptics alike prepared to hear the underdog of the 2016 presidential race, Bernie Sanders, speak. But this wasn't just any old Monday—Sanders had chosen to speak in the historic city of Birmingham, Ala. on the birthday of civil rights icon, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Now, some may view this as a gesture of respect to the black community, and an obvious symbol of Sanders' solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. I'd like to believe most of those people didn't attend the event.
  • Tessa CaseStaff Writer
    tessmc@uab.edu

    It isn’t often that you hear the words “sushi” and “burrito” in the same sentence, and even less often to hear of a mound of sushi-grade Ahi tuna on top of Doritos. This is, however, exactly what you’ll find at Wasabi Juan’s, the focus of this week’s cheap eats.
  • Illustration by Baili BighamIllustration by Baili BighamBaili Grace Bigham - Head Entertainment Columnist
    bgbigham@gmail.com

    Connotations are a funny thing. While two different words can have similar meanings, they may have two entirely different implications. By definition, the concept of community gentrification is similar to community revitalization but with the addition of, or the acknowledgment of, the displacement of low-income individuals and families due to the influx of more affluent individuals. This leads to scrutiny, and criticism, of what should be such a good thing: the rejuvenation of a city.

    I have lived in Birmingham all of my life. I have watched the downtown area get a face-lift and I have also watched neighboring areas, such as Avondale and Woodlawn, take a complete 180-degree turn in both form and population. What were once low-income, dilapidated zones are now thriving hot-spots with restaurants, venues, breweries, coffee shops and, of course, new and renovated housing.

    This isn’t such a bad thing. Everyone wants to see hustle and bustle in their city, especially when it’s improving the quality of life. Things get messy when the people who called this place home before we made it ours are not given a voice, and that is the controversial adjunct that makes “gentrification” a bad word.

    The Birmingham Civil Right Institute's vice president of Education and Exhibitions, Ahmad Ward, spoke about the pros and cons of the gentrification and revitalization of our city.

    “Revitalization in a city is awesome, but when it is at someone’s expense, it’s wrong,” Ward said.

    While it is easy to see all of the wonderful things Birmingham is doing and creating, it’s done a lackluster job of holding up the voices of the residents that lived in those areas before the revitalization efforts. As cost of living inevitably goes up in a thriving city, lower income households are pushed out.

    It can be said that another harsh reality of gentrification is that revitalization follows the money. In other words, the city is being tailored to a certain demographic: the young, the white and the wealthy.

    Ward continued his thought into the form of a question, “Is it race or finances? Can you divorce the two?”

    For Ward, the answer was no. This is simply an example of socioeconomics, he explained — in Birmingham, we are seeing an influx of new faces and business and what we may turn a blind eye to is the outflux of the faces that have been here for many years. While some are excited by Birmingham’s new look, it’s no surprise that others feel outraged and dislocated.

    I do not believe that revitalization necessarily entails the dislocation of culture. The problem posed by these efforts is the misrepresentation of the community, as Birmingham’s population is over 70 percent black. Much of this population is low-income. The new businesses coming to Birmingham are essentially pricing these households out. By not accommodating the majority of a city, it is unavoidable to see the trend forming in favor of a certain demographic. By adding more adequately priced goods to Birmingham’s market, it would give a chance for approval and improvements across the board.

    Working to ensure Birmingham stays united should be a little higher up on the city’s priority list, but where the government lacks in fairness, we as a community must pick up the slack. Birmingham is no stranger to finding opportunities, nor is it new to the idea of strong voices, so let’s create the change needed to maintain the diverse city that we all call home. This problem is not one that is impossible to fix. Turning away from the issues that are causing Birminghamian’s to pack up and leave indicates neglect on the city’s part. Locals that know the veins of this city should be given that respect and a voice to match.
  • Corey Fountain performs at the third Lit House event. Photo courtesy of Nina Morgan.Corey Fountain performing at the third Lit House event. Photo courtesy of Nina Morgan.Nina Morgan - Contributor
    nmorgan@uab.edu

    It can’t be helped—Birmingham is changing. Of course, new developments—for instance, the recently completed Rotary Trail in the Parkside District—dot the city, highlighting renewed corporate and local investment; but these things aren’t lone signifiers of Birmingham’s evolution. Organized and hosted by diverse groups of city-dwellers, community events are too reflecting change and illustrating a new kind of energy and vitality that seems to permeate the city and its people. Lit House is one of those events.  
  • SummerFlicksllustration by Baili BighamBaili Grace Bigham - Head Entertainment Columnist
    bbigham@uab.edu

    Summer is back and the heat has melted away all your plans to go outside, but you don’t want to fall in the same regimen as always. What foolproof plan has never failed any of us? The answer is always unanimously: movie time. However, if Netflix doesn’t seem to be doing the trick for you anymore, fret no more — some of Birmingham’s favorite venues (including Iron City, the Alabama Theatre and the Botanical Gardens) are offering chances to spice up your nights by providing several series of film showings throughout the summer. 
  • IMG 4310At the UAB Pokemon Go event, Blaze helped catch em' all. Photo by Sarah FaulknerJared Chesnut - Staff Writer
    redc@uab.edu

    At this point, Pokemon Go has gone viral to near epidemic levels. There’s a Pokemon gym at the White House (whose champion is a Flying type, naturally), past popular memes are adopting the app into the common vernacular and everyone from your little nephew to Vince McMahon are throwing around Pokeballs and incubating eggs in the never-ending quest for higher combat powers and team pride (Mystic 4 Lyfe). Birmingham itself is no stranger to this sudden phenomenon of people looking down at their phones cackling in glee, and, should you too decide to throw your hat in the arena, we’ve got you covered with some great places in the area to catch a squad that would put Golden State to shame.
  • Hot Diggity Dog logo. Photo by Ian KeelHot Diggity Dogs logo. Photo by Ian KeelMugdha Mokashi - Contributor
    mmokashi@uab.edu

    The unmistakably “hip” part of Birmingham is Avondale, which serves food on the decidedly funkier and fresh side. So I wasn’t surprised to find a gourmet hot dog joint nestled at the hip of Fancy’s on Fifth. This eatery is hidden behind an unassuming door next to a cheerful cartoon-y sign that reads “Hot Diggity Dogs.” When you open the door, you are greeted by a mysterious staircase and no signs of life. This changes quickly, because the loft of the building (directly over another Avondale favorite, Fancy’s on Fifth) is home to a laid-back, lively joint.

    Eating at Hot Diggity Dogs feels like a scene out of a TV show—it’s a quintessential “hang out” spot, with exclusively barstool seating and exposed brick walls. An enormous smiling cartoon hot dog in an Uncle Sam-esque top hat graces the artsy wall. It’s very pop art and very, very new-age Birmingham. The crew behind the counter cook and serve up the dogs fast-food style, and are always joking around with each other and the customers. It’s a friendly, how-do-you-do sort of place that doesn’t take itself too seriously.
  • Raindeer's most recent album cover, titled "You Look Smashing." (Photo courtesy of Raindeer's website).Raindeer's most recent album cover, titled "You Look Smashing." (Photo courtesy of Raindeer's website).Casey Marley - Managing Editor
    managing@insideuab.com

    When I think of psychedelic pop, I think of festival headliners like Tame Impala and MGMT. If these bands don’t ring a bell to you, I highly recommend them for the next time you are stressed out and want to listen to some trippy tunes. Indie band, Raindeer, based out of Baltimore, is also a psychedelic pop band, but unlike the two mentioned previously, Raindeer is highly accessible and has its own unique take on modern day trip-pop. Layering synths with actual instruments, Raindeer brings its own take to the laid-back genre with its quirky lyrics and, for the most part, upbeat melodies.

    Last week, Kscope spoke to the band’s founder and lead member Charlie Hughes to discuss Raindeer’s sound, new album and their upcoming show in Birmingham.
  • Things to do RGB 2Illustration by Corey BrightTamara Imam - Managing Editor
    managing@insideuab.com

    Rotary Trail

    Nestled in downtown and adorned with a 46-foot sign paying homage to the “Magic City” marking its entrance, the Rotary Trail features a four-block walking, running and biking pathway. When the trail officially opened to the Birmingham community in April of this year, it was only two blocks along 1st Avenue South. According to local radio station WBHM, it will eventually run from 20th Street to 24th Street. The trail is complete with benches, picnic tables and solar-powered cell phone charging stations.
  • Mumford and Sons playing a show in London. (Photo from the band's Instagram).Mumford and Sons playing a show in London. (Photo from the band's Instagram).Anna Sims - Digital Copy Editor
    digitalcopy@insideuab.com


    Sarah Faulkner - News Editor
    news@insideuab.com

    Tamara Imam - Copy Editor

    copyed@insideuab.com

    MUSIC

    Iron City:

    Located on 22nd Street South and only about four blocks north of campus, Iron City is an intimate music venue. This venue houses a general admission floor experience, balcony seating and a full bar. According to their Facebook page, the event center’s standing capacity is 1300, which does not include the balcony seating. Iron City is new on Birmingham’s venue scene, having opened in 2013.


  • Robert Ehsan coaches on the sidelines of a men's basketball game as associate head coach. (Photo from UAB Sports)Robert Ehsan coaches on the sidelines of a men's basketball game as associate head coach. (Photo from UAB Sports)Alex Jones
    - Blazeradio General Manager
    alex96@uab.edu

    At a press conference on Tuesday, April 5, Director of Athletics Mark Ingram officially announced Robert Ehsan as the sixth head coach of the men’s basketball team.
  • Nearly 100 students commemorated MLK Day through service to the community. (Photo courtesy of UAB Office of Student Involvement and Leadership).Nearly 100 students commemorated MLK Day through service to the community. (Photo courtesy of UAB Office of Student Involvement and Leadership).April Oberman - Staff Writer
    aprildob@uab.edu

    In remembrance of a man who created a non-violent campaign, lead protests and was jailed in our own Birmingham, the Leadership and Service Council partnered with the Black Student Awareness Committee to host the annual day of service dedicated to Martin Luther King Jr. on Jan. 19.
  • Photo of Fat Sam's Sub StationFat Sam's Sub Station is expected to remain open despite Salman Shatara's passing. Photo by Sarah Faulkner
    Sarah Faulkner -Editor-in-Chief
    editor@insideuab.com

    Local deli owner Mr. Salman “Fat Sam” Shatara passed away Wednesday night at UAB Hospital from a blood clot related to injuries that he sustained in an automobile accident on April 8.

    After opening Fat Sam’s Sub Station in March of 1990 just down the road from UAB’s campus, Fat Sam became a member of the UAB community and displayed a variety of UAB-related memorabilia in his deli. Fat Sam’s Sub Station website is decorated with UAB colors and states that the restaurant has been serving UAB for over 25 years and is UAB’s “best local sandwich shop.” According to his eldest son Mitri in an AL.com article, Fat Sam will be buried with a UAB T-shirt.
  • Vi Kim Ngo is one of the students who has come to UAB through the INTO partnership. Photo by Ian KeelVi Kim Ngo is one of the students who has come to UAB through the INTO partnership. Photo by Ian Keel
    Mark Linn - 
    Copy Editor
    copy@insideuab.com

    The first new students recruited through UAB’s work with INTO University Partnerships have already arrived at UAB and have begun taking classes this summer.
  • Dallas Green playing a show in 2014. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.Dallas Green playing a show in 2014. (Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons).Tuesday, Jan 12

    USGA Senate Meeting
    Hill Student Center 203
    7:30- 9 p.m.
    The Undergraduate Student Government Association will hold an open meeting.

    Radio Free Birmingham
    Saturn
    7 p.m.
    Saturnpresents this free concert series to introduce local bands to the Birmingham community. The doors open at 7 p.m. and the first band takes the stage at 8 p.m.

    Golden Girls and Cheerleaders’ Friends and Family Night
    Bartow Arena
    7 p.m.
    The Golden Girls dance team and UAB Cheerleaders will perform the routines that they will take to UDA and UCA Nationals the following weekend.
  • hattieHattie B’s Nashville hot fried chicken sandwich, topped with slaw and with a side of baked beans. (Photo by Baili Bigham)Baili Grace Bigham- Head Entertainment Columnist
    bbigham@uab.edu

    As a native Alabamian, I understand how essential soul food is for the heart.

    In the South, we take our fried chicken seriously. Hattie B’s is Nashville’s gift to Birmingham. Ever since it opened June 1, it has had a full house. The restaurant, located in Lakeview across from Jack Brown’s and Oasis, is the only Hattie B’s outside of Tennessee.