The Vulcan Historical Review is published annually by the Chi Omicron Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The journal is completely student-written and student-edited by undergraduate and graduate students at UAB. A launch party for each new issue is held in August.

All history students at UAB, including recent alumni, are encouraged to submit articles, reviews, essays, oral histories, or other works of historical interest to be considered for publication. Submissions by any currently enrolled UAB student are also welcome. Please send inquires to:

Phi Alpha Theta Advisor
UAB Department of History
HHB 360
1401 University Boulevard
Birmingham, AL 35294-1152

Issues:

Volume 23, 2019

Volume 23, 2019

Our authors explore the intersection between past traditions and present injustices to bridge the gap in understanding both how we as a society have created these social conditions, as well as if this understanding requires new evaluation by exploring material with a modern perspective.

Volume 22, 2018

Volume 22, 2018

This twenty-second edition of the journal explores various types of history in the hopes to expand scholarly consideration of the past as stated above. Our featured sections include highlighting female perspectives and feminist history in America, cultural histories in America and their legacies, a look at some foreign subjects in history, as well as local history in Birmingham.

Volume 21, 2017

Volume 21, 2017

Our current issue perpetuates the attention to detail required by the historian, as well as the critical examination of complex historical situations. We have also chosen to continue our use of Birmingham’s iconic statue, the mighty Vulcan, for our cover, in solidarity with many previous issues. We again embraced debate amongst our scholars in an argumentative section pertaining to a controversial issue.

Volume 20, 2016

Volume 20, 2016

It could not have been a more exciting time to work on the Vulcan Historical Review (VHR) as we celebrate or 20th anniversary volume. We cannot fail to recognize that we stand here today, because of the efforts of all previous editors, authors, and faculty advisors whose annual hard work has paved the way. In recognition of their work, we have decided to use their names to create the cover of this year’s journal. The twenty stepping stones that form VHR’s path have been built on the achievements of all those who came before us, and we thought it fitting to represent this visually by using their names as building material for the cover.

Volume 19, 2015

Volume 19, 2015

This year the board has chosen to let the papers speak for themselves. What makes the VHR such a brilliant journal is that it demonstrates many different kinds of historical research and analysis. Whether the papers are dealing with events that seem rather close to home, like the legacy of Gene Bartow to the UAB Athletic Department, or the writings of a Roman philosopher thousands of years in the past, any reader of this journal can move through the pages with our promise that each article represents the fine and detailed scholarship of all those involved.

Volume 18, 2014

Volume 18, 2014

We still endeavor to answer crucial questions raised by the Civil War: Who is a human being and what do particular characterizations of that concept entail? What do freedom and equality denote in reality? What, exactly, does it mean to live in a just society? How does one assess such abstract and historically polemical ideas?

Volume 17, 2013

Volume 17, 2013

This year, to memorialize the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement, the editorial staff of the Vulcan Historical Review aims to pay tribute to the often unknown and uncelebrated heroes of the movement, who had the courage and determination to stand up for what others were reluctant to face. Without them, a dark chapter in America's history might have been prolonged or even have remained.

Volume 16, 2012

Volume 16, 2012

This issue's contents include articles on terrorism, Cuba, children in wartime, Andrzej Wajda, debates over the Constitutionality of slavery in 1787, Jacques-Louis David, New England Puritanism, and Christian pilgrims. The invited essay is "What's in the Arab Seasons?" by Farah A. Al Farhan.