Department of Mathematics

  • 2022 Padma Award recipients named

    The Padma Award recognizes UAB faculty, staff and students who go the extra mile in support of underrepresented populations.

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  • Lee’s journey through UAB is marked with “discovery and self-exploration”

    Angela Lee will be graduating from UAB on April 30 with a double major in chemistry and mathematics, leaving behind a trail of impressive academic and community accomplishments.

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  • Seven students receive 2022 Dean’s Awards for Outstanding Undergraduate and Graduate Students

    Each academic year, the UAB College of Arts and Sciences receives departmental nominations for the Dean’s Awards for Outstanding Undergraduate Students and Outstanding Graduate Students.

    Each academic year, the UAB College of Arts and Sciences receives departmental nominations for the Dean’s Awards for Outstanding Undergraduate Students and Outstanding Graduate Students. The dean’s selection committee gives these awards to exceptional undergraduate and graduate students in the College who have made significant contributions to the UAB community.

    After carefully reviewing the 2022 nominations—which include detailed recommendation letters from faculty members and mentors—Dean Kecia M. Thomas, Ph.D., and her committee have selected four undergraduate students and three graduate students for the awards. At the upcoming 2022 commencement ceremonies, the College will acknowledge and celebrate the recipients.

    Congratulations to the following students for receiving this prestigious award:

    2022 Undergraduate Dean’s Awards

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    2022 Graduate Dean’s Awards

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  • Donors establish endowed lectureship and scholarship in honor of Roger T. Lewis

    Roger T. Lewis, Ph.D., served as a thoughtful and forward-looking leader in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Mathematics for over four decades.

    Roger T. Lewis, Ph.D.Roger T. Lewis, Ph.D., served as a thoughtful and forward-looking leader in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s Department of Mathematics for over four decades. He joined the department in 1975 and, through his tireless efforts, advocated for research programs that led to numerous grants from the National Science Foundation. Dr. Lewis also served as chair of the department and helped establish a strong foundation for its future growth and prosperity.

    Sadly, Dr. Lewis passed away in 2021. His commitment to and passion for the Department of Mathematics will carry on, though. Through a generous gift, Dr. Barbara A. Lewis, Dr. John C. Mayer, and Dr. Jeanne Hutchison have established the Roger T. Lewis Endowed Lectureship and the Roger T. Lewis Endowed Scholarship.

    The Roger T. Lewis Endowed Lectureship in Mathematics will fund and create opportunities for lectures and events within the Department of Mathematics that will spur collaboration between faculty, students, and staff.

    The Roger T. Lewis Endowed Scholarship in Mathematics will provide financial support to undergraduate or graduate students based on their academic achievement.

    “Roger, along with three other faculty members, was instrumental in putting UAB Mathematics on the international map by initiating a series of International Conferences on Differential Equations and Mathematical Physics in 1981, his own research area,” said Dr. John C. Mayer, professor in the Department of Mathematics. “He was also eager to support and encourage the research of the faculty in other areas as well, culminating in establishing the Ph.D. degree program in Applied Mathematics at UAB.”

    The College of Arts and Sciences deeply appreciates the extraordinary contributions Dr. Lewis made to the department over the years. Also, the College offers its appreciation to Dr. Barbara A. Lewis, Dr. Mayer, and Dr. Hutchison for honoring his life and work with a heartfelt gift that focuses on the future of the department and its people.

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  • Johnny Bates honors his father with an endowed scholarship in mathematics

    When Johnny Edward “Rusty” Bates, M.D., was growing up in Sipsey, Alabama, he viewed his father, a draftsman and engineer, as one of the smartest people he knew.

    When Johnny Edward “Rusty” Bates, M.D., was growing up in Sipsey, Alabama, he viewed his father, a draftsman and engineer, as one of the smartest people he knew.

    “My father was an inspiration,” said Bates.

    Although his father, Henry E. Bates Jr., was both skillful and knowledgeable, he was limited in his ability to advance in his career due to his academic credentials. According to Bates, “He always felt that not having his degree impeded his ability to move up the ranks.”

    Johnny Edward “Rusty” Bates, M.D.For Bates, this observation about his father serves as an enduring source of inspiration, both in his academic journey and his professional career.

    While in middle and high school, Bates excelled in mathematics and learned from nurturing teachers who helped him establish a strong foundation in the discipline. As he looked to his future, he decided to pursue a degree in mathematics, while also working full-time. He briefly attended Birmingham-Southern College, then enrolled at Walker College to earn his associate degree.

    He envisioned attending the University of Alabama at Birmingham after Walker College, but he faced a financial barrier. “I didn’t come from a wealthy family,” said Bates. Thankfully, he received a generous scholarship, which helped him scale the barrier. That scholarship, which came from a wealthy businessman, set him on a new academic trajectory.

    He enrolled at UAB and earned a B.S. in Mathematics and a minor in art history. During his time as an undergraduate at UAB, he saw and appreciated the level of care and excellence his professors brought to the classroom each day.

    “I had a great experience with great educators,” said Bates. “They loved teaching. [My professors] took an interest in me as a student. They wrote letters for me when I applied to medical school.”

    After completing his undergraduate degree, Bates was accepted into the Heersink School of Medicine. He earned an M.D. in 1982, then completed his residency at University of Texas in Galveston.

    Through his studies and training, Bates became deeply interested taking care of populations of patients, rather than focusing on individual patients. He decided he wanted to become a leader in correctional care, so he started his own company, Quality Correctional Healthcare (QCHC).

    While Bates studied mathematics and medicine at UAB, he enjoyed solving problems and making decisions that would improve outcomes. Nowadays, he applies those same skills at QCHC. “I’m going to use those techniques to improve our overall services. We’re going to need to find smarter and better ways of doing things,” said Bates.

    He has continued his academic journey to support these goals too. He earned a Master of Medical Management for Physicians from Carnegie Mellon University, and, recently, he started taking courses in artificial intelligence and machine learning from the University of Texas at Austin and the Massachusetts Institute for Technology.

    Bates still looks back on the scholarship that helped him establish his academic foundation at UAB with gratitude, while also considering the obstacles his father faced. Moving forward, he wants to support future students as they pursue degrees in mathematics and honor his father at the same time. Given these priorities, Bates recently established the Henry E. Bates Jr. Endowed Scholarship in Mathematics, which will benefit undergraduate mathematics students who demonstrate strong academic promise.

    “I think everybody who desires an education should be able to get an education,” said Bates. “I want to be able to benefit someone who has that desire but may not have the resources to get the degree.”

    Clearly, Bates’s generosity and admiration for his father are reflected in this endowed scholarship in the Department of Mathematics.

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  • Blazing a new path to follow one’s dream

    Christina J. Glenn is the first Doctor of Public Health with a concentration in biostatistics graduate from UAB’s School of Public Health.

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  • I am Arts and Sciences: Eric Teoh

    For students who study math in college, the notion of saving lives with their knowledge may seem distant — maybe even far-fetched. For Eric Teoh, director of statistical services at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the connection between math and lifesaving work is crystal clear.

    For students who study math in college, the notion of saving lives with their knowledge may seem distant — maybe even far-fetched. For Eric Teoh, director of statistical services at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, the connection between math and lifesaving work is crystal clear.

    That was not always the case, though. In high school, Teoh had a complicated relationship with mathematics.

    Eric Teoh “I wasn’t very good at math until I got to college,” said Teoh. “I let it intimidate me.”

    Teoh admits that he did not have a positive attitude about the discipline prior to college. However, when the time came to declare a major at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, he unexpectedly selected the subject that posed numerous challenges for him in high school.

    “At the time, I thought to myself, ‘I can do anything — I’ll major in math,’” said Teoh.

    This new outlook on life (and education) prompted a different mindset for Teoh. Instead of allowing math to get the best of him, he found himself working harder and challenging himself to master the discipline. And that’s exactly what happened.

    “The faculty in the Department of Mathematics took a chance on me,” said Teoh. “Between them taking a chance on me and a shift in my attitude, I made it work.”

    Right after being accepted to UAB, Teoh was also accepted into the Mathematics Fast Track Program. Through the program, Teoh earned both a B.S. and M.S. in Mathematics in only four years. Along the way, he also took a few extra courses in a variety of subjects, including more than were required for him to earn a minor in chemistry. All in a day’s work for Teoh.

    “I think UAB was an excellent place to learn,” said Teoh. “We learned a lot of important skills for work and life in general. We learned to think independently.”

    After graduating from UAB, Teoh enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to pursue a Ph.D. in Biostatistics. Although the program was engaging, Teoh started reevaluating his future with a new focus on starting a career that would allow him to save lives. His reflective mindset motivated him to leave Chapel Hill and accept a role as a data analyst with the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). According to Teoh, IIHS — an independent, nonprofit scientific and educational organization dedicated to reducing deaths, injuries, and property damage from motor vehicle crashes — aligned with his vision, values, and talents.

    Now, 15 years after taking the job with IIHS, Teoh has a clear perspective on the transportable skills he developed while at UAB and the ways in which his work improves the world.

    “I’ve learned the value of simplicity,” said Teoh. “We try to use the simplest scientifically sound analysis methods so everyone can understand our work and use it to make better decisions.”

    When Teoh reflects on his professional accomplishments, he immediately circles back to the values that drove him to leave Chapel Hill and start his job with IIHS: saving lives and reducing harm.

    “There are no panaceas or silver bullets in this field, so every effective countermeasure is important,” said Teoh. “Some of the biggest ones from my research studies include antilock braking systems on motorcycles, front crash prevention technology on large trucks, graduated driver licensing laws for teenage drivers, and vehicle roof strength in rollover crashes.”

    Teoh’s journey is full of valuable lessons — that said, there is one theme in particular that he emphasizes when speaking with students who are crafting their visions for the future.

    “Do not be afraid of changing your mind on future plans,” said Teoh. “[If you do change your mind] do so in a way that builds off of what you’ve already accomplished. I changed my mind substantially at least a couple times and, looking back, I’m glad I did each time.”

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  • Stanislavova selected to lead UAB Department of Mathematics

    Milena Stanislavova, Ph.D., has been named the chair of the Department of Mathematics in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences.

    Milena Stanislavova, Ph.D., has been named the chair of the Department of Mathematics in the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s College of Arts and Sciences.

    Dr. Stanislavova was trained in all areas of pure and applied mathematics. She earned her M.S. in Mathematics from Sofia University in Bulgaria in 1993 and Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of Missouri in 2000. Dr. Stanislavova’s goal as an educator is to help students gain a more complete understanding of the intrinsic beauty of mathematics, its interdisciplinary connections, and the many doors its analytical skills can open.

    Dr. Stanislavova comes from the University of Kansas, where she started in 2002. She was director of graduate studies in the Department of Mathematics from 2012-2017 and, most recently, served as chair of the Department of Economics since 2017. Dr. Stanislavova’s research is in differential equations and dynamical systems, focusing on the stability of special solutions of nonlinear differential equations of mathematical physics.

    “Dr. Stanislavova is uniquely prepared to lead the Department of Mathematics. As a productive and funded scholar at the University of Kansas, she provided transformative leadership to the Department of Economics there,” said Kecia M. Thomas, Ph.D., dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. “I look forward to all the ways in which she will support the growth of mathematics at UAB, while also promoting greater collaboration with other College of Arts and Sciences units — like physics and computer science — as well as other schools at UAB.”

    Dr. Stanislavova’s research has been continuously supported by the Applied Mathematics Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). She has collaborated on establishing a new NSF-funded regional partial differential equations and dynamical systems annual conference together with colleagues from the University of Missouri and the University of Nebraska Lincoln.

    She is passionate about creating opportunities for women to pursue careers in mathematics and about helping and mentoring them in the profession.

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  • Roger T. Lewis - In Remembrance

    Roger Lewis has passed away, but his impact on the development of our Mathematics Department will be felt for many years by both students and faculty. 

    Roger Lewis has passed away, but his impact on the development of our Mathematics Department will be felt for many years by both students and faculty. Before entering graduate school at the University of Tennessee, Roger had worked in industry as a mathematician at the Ballistics Research Labs (Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland) and RCA Service Corporation (Patrick Air Force Base in Florida). Following this, he received his M.S. in mathematics from the Florida Institute of Technology (1964) and Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee (1972). He was briefly at Slippery Rock State College in Pennsylvania before joining UAB in 1975.

    At this time, UAB was only two years beyond the conversion from junior college to university status, and the Department of Mathematics was essentially a junior college department, with faculty involved primarily in teaching remedial and elementary mathematics courses. Further, at this time there were no organized research or grant initiatives in mathematics. 

    Then, in 1978, the department had a new chairman who placed some emphasis on visible research programs which could attract funding. Roger made the most of this opening. He had continued to expand on the work of his doctoral thesis, and in 1980 he received the department’s first NSF research grant. 

    This was followed by a bold plan developed jointly by Roger and Ian Knowles, who Roger had first met at a conference in Scotland in 1974 and who later joined our department. Although on paper UAB did not have facilities to host a large international conference, in 1986 they managed to find space and organize a conference which brought many of the world’s leading researchers in differential equations and mathematical physics to Birmingham (260 mathematicians from 22 countries). This was followed up by conferences in 1990, 92, 94, 97, 99, 2002 and 2005. These were so successful that Barry Simon of CalTech encouraged several of his graduate students to apply for positions at UAB upon receiving their doctorates. And some applicants for positions in the department commented on the impact our meetings had on them and their interest in joining the UAB faculty.

    Roger was chairman of the department in 1984 - 87 and 1997 - 2001 and continued the practice of filling new positions with research talent. This was paying off, and UAB at one point was ranked number three in the Southeast (just behind Duke and Georgia Tech) in NSF grants per faculty. This success was no doubt made possible partly through Roger’s personal manner as chairman.  He was a familiar figure to department members, who knew him as a reasonable person who could be approached with ideas and observations. He was meticulous in honoring agreements, and one had the confidence that he was always trying to do the right thing, which in this setting was to achieve best results for faculty and students. He brought a high level of integrity to his position as chairman, and inspired confidence in those who worked with him on various projects to improve department teaching and research.

    In addition to individual grants faculty were winning for their research, the university was awarded an EPSCoR grant (1986 - 91). These grants were for Established Programs to Stimulate Competitive Research and were large interdisciplinary university grants designed to enable promising departments to develop their research potential. Over the next few years, the Mathematics Department (along with Physics and other areas) enjoyed substantial EPSCoR funding to develop research activities they had been building over the past few years. Roger was a lead investigator on our first EPSCoR proposal.

    In addition to these successful efforts to develop research areas, productivity and funding, the department took the significant step of beginning a doctoral program. Previously within the Alabama system there had been a doctoral mathematics program only at the Tuscaloosa campus. But Roger engaged UAB administration and interested department members to lead UAB’s objective of raising its graduate program to the highest level. After skillfully weaving through sensitive and highly political issues, a joint program involving the Birmingham, Tuscaloosa and Huntsville campuses emerged and received state approval. Our doctoral program is now a high point of our department and has generated additional initiatives to raise the level of hiring research faculty and developing the research capabilities of our students. And in his leadership role, Roger continued his productivity past retirement, producing a total of 51 books and papers.

    Finally, it is a sign of the current status of the department that UAB was selected to host an NSF Fast Track program, in which undergraduate students showing talent for mathematics are given the opportunity to accelerate their programs to reach the graduate level more quickly. In this way the tremendous success of the research and graduate activities of the department have helped develop new opportunities for undergraduate students as well.

    Through these efforts, Roger has been a significant figure in achieving the present success of the department, and in pointing a way to build an even more exciting future for our students and faculty.


    Funeral services will be held on Monday, June 14, 2021, at 12:00 p.m. at Independent Presbyterian Church, 3100 Highland Avenue, Birmingham, AL 35205.

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  • I Am Arts and Sciences: Vincent Cirel

    Vincent Cirel developed a passion for mathematics in high school and found personal inspiration even earlier in life working with his grandfather as a land surveyor. When it was time to pursue his undergraduate degree, he looked to the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    While growing up in Birmingham, Alabama, Vincent Cirel developed a passion for mathematics in high school and found personal inspiration even earlier in life working with his grandfather as a land surveyor. When it was time to pursue his undergraduate degree, he looked to the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

    "I always thought I'd do my undergraduate work at UAB," said Cirel. "It was a part of my hometown."

    During his tenure at UAB, Cirel pursued a major in mathematics and a minor in physics. His talents and interests aligned with the emergence of the Word Wide Web, and, as a result, he applied his valuable knowledge in real-time at UAB's Health Sciences Learning Technologies Lab.

    He became the co-founder and co-chair of the UAB Web Advisory Group, and he navigated the evolution of the web at UAB for seven years. This experience reflects a primary theme in Cirel's life and career—leveraging emerging technologies during pivotal moments within institutions and businesses.

    "I was passionate about science and technology, and I blended it with the business world," said Cirel.

    Cirel continued to build his knowledge and expertise, earning a Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from UAB and a Master of Business Administration from Vanderbilt University. By combining his cross-curricular academic interests in mathematics, applied sciences, and business, Cirel successfully co-led Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings through a defining moment in 2013.

    "Norwegian went public in 2013," said Cirel. "It transformed the cruise line industry."

    As Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer for Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, Cirel spearheaded the expansion of mobile/social to include full customer lifecycle integration and got to stand at the podium when the company was added to the NASDAQ. It was a defining point in his career.

    Throughout his numerous professional milestones, Cirel admits that he never steered far from his early foundations in mathematics and physics. "That foundation is something I rely on and apply everyday," said Cirel.

    Today, Cirel is the executive vice president of Worldstrides, Inc. (in addition to many independent consulting engagements) and, through these roles, he finds ways to leverage emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence and quantum computing. As he continues to blaze ahead, he sees his alma mater as a source of continued pride and inspiration. 

    "It's interesting to watch how UAB has grown in size and impact. It's what you always hope will happen," said Cirel.

    As Cirel's career moves forward, he continues to watch the transformation of the business world, noting that fewer people are focused solely on financial wealth. He sees workplaces emphasizing and elevating personal growth and diversity, equity, and inclusion, which he believes is important and necessary.

    He encourages future UAB graduates to think about both their personal and professional goals as they look ahead. "The most important early-career question to ask is, 'Where does my passion lie?' And do your very best to align your efforts to that answer," said Cirel.

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  • More than 1,100 employees to be honored with annual service awards

    This year, the university recognizes 50 years of service by Jeanne Hutchison, Ph.D., and Ferdinand Urthaler, M.D., and 45 years of service by Robert Kim M.D., and Joseph Lovetto. In addition, 294 employees with 20 or more years and 904 with five, 10 and 15 years will honored for their longevity.

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  • Xavier Turner and Angela Lee named Mr. and Ms. UAB 2021

    Started in 1981, the Mr. and Ms. UAB Scholarship Competition is one of UAB’s longest-standing Homecoming traditions.

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  • 50 years, 8 buildings, 1 career: Vaughan says time at UAB was a ‘long, strange’ but rewarding trip

    Loy Vaughan, associate professor of mathematics, clocked 50 years of service at UAB before retiring in January. The West End native remembers introducing the Apple II into the mathematics classroom in the late 1970s, playing handball with Gene Bartow and seeing his wife and children all earn medical degrees — all while watching UAB becoming the epicenter of the city in which he grew up.

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  • Computer science students use innovation, technology for drone ideation project

    A UAB instructor gave his students the chance to work on a group ideation drone project, developing new ways to use drones for farming.

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  • Why I Give: Stephen Odaibo, M.D.

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters—including Stephen G. Odaibo, M.D., (B.S., 2001; M.S., 2002)—to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

     

    Arts & Sciences magazine: What do you do for a living?

    Stephen Odaibo: I am a retina physician, computer scientist, AI Engineer, and healthcare AI startup founder and CEO. I am also on the clinical faculty of the MD Anderson Cancer Center, the No.1 ranked cancer center in the U.S. My company, RETINA-AI Health Inc. builds artificial intelligence (AI) systems to improve healthcare. We developed the world's first mobile AI app for eye care providers, and our autonomous diabetic retinopathy AI screening system is currently in independent validation testing in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Healthcare System.

    A&S: Did you benefit from scholarships when you were a student?

    SO: Yes, I did. I was a recipient of the Mathematics Fast-Track Program Scholarship, which was supported by the National Science Foundation and was directed by Prof. John Mayer and Prof. Lex Oversteegen of the Mathematics Department. I received my B.S. and M.S. degrees in mathematics from the College in 2001 and 2002 respectively. These launched me to Duke University for medical school and graduate school in computer science. My career took me to Duke University Hospital for an internal medicine internship, Howard University for residency, and the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor for a retina fellowship. I had an academic advantage everywhere I went. It was the UAB Math advantage.

    A&S: What made you decide to make a gift to the College of Arts and Sciences?

    SO: Much of the success I am now enjoying in my career can be traced back to the opportunities that were granted me through the Mathematics Department at the College of Arts and Sciences. The opportunity to build AI to shape the future of healthcare not just in the U.S. but globally, is one for which I am truly grateful. It was only natural for me to give something back to the College. And I hope to have more opportunities in the future to give more back to UAB.

    A&S: Where do you see the College of Arts and Sciences in the next ten years? Fifty years?

    SO: I see the College of Arts and Sciences taking its rightful place amongst the most renowned colleges in the world in terms of measurable impact of its ongoing research and development. And also in terms of the quality and impact of its graduates across industries the world over.

    Read more on Dr. Stephen Odaibo in his alumni profile.


    Donor support is invaluable in ensuring that our students receive the quality education that, regardless of their course of study, will set them on the path to success. For additional information regarding gifts to the College of Arts and Sciences, please contact Camille Epps at camilleepps@uab.edu or call (205) 996-2154.

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  • Why I Give: Elizabeth and Charlie Scribner

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

    Many of our donors give to the College as a way of showing their appreciation for the people who inspired and guided them to academic and professional success. We asked a few of our supporters—including Charlie (M.P.A., 2015) and Elizabeth Scribner (M.S., 2011; Ph.D., 2017)—to share their stories of why they give and how investing in the College will ensure the success of our future students.

     

    Arts & Sciences magazine: What do you do for a living?

    Elizabeth Scribner: I'm an analyst in model risk management and validation at Regions Bank. Charles is executive director of Black Warrior Riverkeeper and president of Waterkeepers Alabama.

    A&S: Did you benefit from scholarships when you were a student?

    ES: Yes, I was the recipient of a year-long fellowship through the Department of Mathematics, as well as a two-time recipient of the James Ward Memorial Award for Research in Mathematical Biology.

    A&S: What made you decide to make a gift to the College of Arts and Sciences?

    Charles Scribner: UAB is a pivotal force in Birmingham’s renaissance, and the College of Arts and Sciences is the heart of UAB. In two very different CAS graduate school programs, the classes that Elizabeth and I took and the relationships we made have all been invaluable to our careers. I also have the pleasure of now working with College of Arts and Sciences staff in my role as president of the UAB MPA Alumni Society and see their incredible skill and passion for serving the College and the community.

    A&S: Where do you see the College of Arts and Sciences in the next ten years? Fifty years?

    CS: The College of Arts and Sciences does not simply cover an amazingly wide range of important fields, it also connects them through one impeccably organized institution and alumni network. As society is increasingly challenged by division and hostility, the networking and collaborative opportunities the College provides students, faculty, and alumni from many backgrounds and curricula will be crucial for UAB, Birmingham, and the world.


    Donor support is invaluable in ensuring that our students receive the quality education that, regardless of their course of study, will set them on the path to success. For additional information regarding gifts to the College of Arts and Sciences, please contact Camille Epps at camilleepps@uab.edu or call (205) 996-2154.

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  • Entrepreneurial student teams compete and solve real-world problems

    Real-world problems are solved through a two-month entrepreneurship educational experience for students across UAB’s campus.

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  • UAB math, public health undergraduate students shine at international research conference

    Undergraduate students won awards for their research in virtual reality and child safety and in stabilization of proteins.

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  • Kuzmanic Top 30 Finalist for 2019 NCAA Woman of the Year Award

    A UAB female student-athlete has been named a finalist for the NCAA Woman of the Year Award, recognizing her academic, athletic, leadership and community service success.

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  • UAB’s new University Hall fans Blazer spirit with flames, dragon’s tail

    Furnishings in an array of gold and green, an artistic display of Blaze’s flames in metal panels and a colorful terrazzo floor like a dragon’s tail creatively express the spirit of UAB.

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