Displaying items by tag: department of biomedical engineering

Single-nucleus RNA-sequencing in a newborn pig model showed increased cell cycle activity and proliferation in cardiomyocytes, which helped remuscularize the left ventricle after experimental heart attack.
Two School of Engineering students have received a Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation Scholarship from the Department of Defense.
Researchers have been awarded a $2.6 million, four-year National Institutes of Health grant to evaluate a safer and more durable stent design, using techniques licensed through the UAB Harbert Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship by the UAB spinoff company Endomimetics LLC.
Topics include induced pluripotent stem cell technologies, nanotechnologies, nanomedicine, advanced biomanufacturing, 3D culture systems, 3D organoid systems, genetic approaches to cardiovascular tissue engineering and organs-on-a-chip.
The support surface invented by two UAB undergraduate engineering students will help change how nurses and patient care teams can provide care for patients in the hospital.

Basic and translational research in this field aims to repair heart injury and prevent the heart failure that often follows a heart attack.

Preclinical experiments show how to identify non-responding tumors and improve their response to immunotherapy, using two investigational new drugs that are permitted for human use. Physicians could immediately start investigational research in patients to test the effectiveness of this personalized approach.

Release of TT-10 from nanoparticles improved heart function after a heart attack, accompanied by increased cardiomyocyte proliferation and smaller infarct size.

Researchers used a pig model of heart attacks, which more closely resembles the human heart in size and physiology, and thus has high clinical relevance to human disease.
The virtual symposium will cover topics such as gene editing and cardiac stem cells in heart failure and feature the National Academy of Medicine president as a keynote speaker.
The exosomes were secreted by cardiac cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells. These non-living exosomes may be an easier form of regenerative treatment than living cells.
Injections of two chemicals in a slow-release form significantly reduced the size of dead heart tissue and improved the function of the left ventricle.

Educational and economic opportunities in central Alabama are enhanced by new microscope available for research.  

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