Displaying items by tag: department of biomedical engineering

These research areas — part of the Convergence Revolution — have the greatest potential of achieving tremendous impact on the field of medicine in the coming decades or century.
The modified mRNA — delivered after experimental heart attacks — transiently allows heart muscle cells to proliferate, leading to reduced infarct size and improved heart performance compared to untreated animals.
Bracamonte, Sun and Wang received two-year fellowships from the American Heart Association for their research within the department of biomedical engineering.
Neuroengineering blends engineering principles with neuroscience to find better ways to treat neurological conditions and to build on understanding how the brain and nervous system function.
The study’s goal is to limit the toxic side effects common to many cancer therapies while not affecting their therapeutic benefits.
Insights gained from this project can lead to a new understanding of the mechanisms by which human deep-brain activity gives rise to cognitive-emotional behaviors, such as social thought processes, impulsivity and affect.
Direct reprogramming is a potential therapy for heart attack patients. In vitro, TBX20 improved contractility and mitochondrial function of reprogrammed heart muscle cells.
Zhang wins $11.2 million NIH PPG grant to improve heart attack recovery through growth of new heart muscle cells.
The Council on Basic Cardiovascular Sciences, known as the BCVS, is one of the largest councils at the American Heart Association, and it is one of the largest organizations in cardiovascular sciences globally, with more than 4,700 members.
Single-nucleus RNA-sequencing in a newborn pig model showed increased cell cycle activity and proliferation in cardiomyocytes, which helped remuscularize the left ventricle after experimental heart attack.
Two School of Engineering students have received a Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation Scholarship from the Department of Defense.
Researchers have been awarded a $2.6 million, four-year National Institutes of Health grant to evaluate a safer and more durable stent design, using techniques licensed through the UAB Harbert Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship by the UAB spinoff company Endomimetics LLC.
Topics include induced pluripotent stem cell technologies, nanotechnologies, nanomedicine, advanced biomanufacturing, 3D culture systems, 3D organoid systems, genetic approaches to cardiovascular tissue engineering and organs-on-a-chip.
The support surface invented by two UAB undergraduate engineering students will help change how nurses and patient care teams can provide care for patients in the hospital.
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