Displaying items by tag: department of epidemiology

The findings emphasize the importance of wide-reaching public health interventions to prevent hypertension among this population.
Olivia Affuso, Ph.D., was taken to the hospital after being stung more than 50 times by the bees.
These findings suggest that large geographic treatment disparities in high-intensity statin use after a heart attack are poorly understood and require further research and intervention.
Measuring blood pressure at home will ensure doctors are treating people who need to be treated for high blood pressure and are not starting patients on medication who may not have hypertension.
A recent study found that, while several interventions to improve the use of cholesterol-lowering medications have been implemented in the last decade, the percentage of adults taking statins regularly still remains low.
Masked hypertension occurs when people have normal blood pressure readings at the doctor’s office, but high blood pressure when measured outside of a clinical setting.
People of Mexican descent with variants of a certain gene are more at risk for Type 2 diabetes, but the risk of developing the disease does not increase for people of other Hispanic and Latino background groups.
A report by the American Heart Association found that 48 percent of U.S. adults live with some type of cardiovascular disease.
SPRINT trial: Intensive lowering of blood pressure did not significantly reduce dementia risk but did have a measurable impact on mild cognitive impairment.
The first study to evaluate whether differences between men and women in the risk of stroke varies by race and age found that some risk factors were more important for white women than white men, but the risk factors for black women and black men had similar associations with stroke risk.  
The number of hours of sleep people receive each night may affect their risk of stroke differently based on race, according to a new study.
Bertha Hidalgo, Ph.D., will help the organization continue to educate and advocate for epidemiologists in their efforts to promote good science and public health.
UAB was part of a groundbreaking trial that is believed to be the first time it has been proved that the risk of mild cognitive impairment and dementia can be reduced through high blood-pressure treatment.
In this role, Bertha Hidalgo, Ph.D., will help provide input on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s strategic research priorities and scientific opportunities.
A study led by UAB professor Paul Muntner, Ph.D., looks at the impact of the new hypertension guideline set by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
A study to better understand racial and regional differences in deaths from strokes will be funded through 2023 by a $20.4 million grant.
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