Displaying items by tag: department of microbiology

X-ray crystallography revealed the structure of the HIV-1 matrix protein at 2.1 angstroms resolution, advancing understanding of key mechanisms of viral assembly.
This discovery validates siderophore secretion as a drug target in tuberculosis and reveals a new mechanism for putative drugs. Many tuberculosis bacteria are highly resistant to multiple antibiotics.
Researchers show how two types of immune cells — one a part of the innate immune system and the other a part of the adaptive immune system — play distinct and indispensable roles in the colon to defend against pathogenic bacteria.
The monoclonal antibody cocktail is deliverable via a nasal dose, and it is also effective against SARS, MERS and several coronavirus cold viruses. The antibodies are engineered for long-acting effectiveness, potentially lasting a year or more when used in humans.
Björkman will speak on “Structural correlates of antibody neutralization of pathogenic viruses.”
In response to a viral infection, intrinsic IL-2 production by effector CD8 T cells affects IL-2 signaling, leading to different fates for two subsets of those cells — the one producing IL-2 and the one not producing IL-2.
Bacteria use molecular machines to move proteins, including toxins, across cell membranes. M. tuberculosis, which kills more than 1 million people a year, uses the ESX-4 type VII secretion system to transports its potent exotoxin.
Lupus, an autoimmune disease that can attack any part of the body, can be confounding because patients often respond differently to the same treatment, and they vary widely in the severity of their symptoms.
The O’Neal Invests program funds UAB investigators starting new cancer-related projects to initiate key, preliminary work needed to enable competitive R01 applications from the NIH.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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The higher infectivity correlates with mutations that increase viral binding to a cell surface glucosaminoglycan, heparan sulfate.

This finding upends the long-held paradigm that priming during lung infections takes place only in the draining lymph nodes, and it will be key to developing more efficient vaccinations and therapies for respiratory challenges.

Six graduate students in the Academic Medical Center of the 21st Century scholarship program will network with medical professionals, train with top research doctors and receive research funding from the UAB School of Medicine. 

MicroCT of infected human lung tissue, along with histology and immunohistochemistry, was used to construct images of TB granulomas, airways and vasculature.

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