Displaying items by tag: division of transplantation

Hanaway is honored to receive the professorship that was established in honor of Martha Tankersley and her transformative commitment as the transplant administrator for UAB Medicine.
UAB has the first program in the United States to offer uterus transplantation outside of a clinical research trial and is one of very few centers in the world accepting new patients.
During the past half-century, the UAB Comprehensive Transplant Institute has pioneered many changes, including groundbreaking research, new medicines and innovative techniques.
With news about UAB’s first peer-reviewed, published transplant of genetically modified pig kidneys into a brain-dead human individual, there are many questions about what this means for the future of transplant and how this will save countless lives moving forward.
In the study published in the American Journal of Transplantation, UAB researchers tested the first human preclinical model for transplanting genetically modified pig kidneys into humans.
Jim Parsons’ legacy paves the way for thousands to potentially receive lifesaving organs through UAB’s xenotransplantation program.
The human preclinical model at UAB provides important knowledge before a Phase I clinical trial can begin for living human recipients. Decades of work by researchers across the world preceded UAB’s first clinical-grade pig kidney xenotransplant.
From its incompatible kidney transplant program to deceased donor programs, to xenotransplantation, UAB continues to seek ways to help patients who face end-stage renal disease.
Record $95 million Heersink lead gift to advance strategic growth and biomedical innovation.
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The Journal of Pakistan Medical Association reported in 2016 that 69.6 percent of registered medical doctors were male.
In October 2020, amid a global pandemic, the UAB Comprehensive Transplant Institute launched the Southeast’s first uterus transplant program — only the fourth of its kind in the United States.
Cooper Pierce was 13 years old when doctors diagnosed him with pulmonary hypertension. He had a heart and double-lung transplant at UAB Hospital. Now, he is a student at UAB and hopes his story can inspire others.
Doctors at UAB are now able to safely transplant organs from hepatitis C-positive donors into uninfected recipients and then treat the patients with antiviral therapy.
Founded in 2017, the navigator program works with both recipients and donors to identify needs and guide each through the process to transplantation and post-transplant.
The city of Birmingham joins UAB and the state of Alabama by providing paid leave for living organ donors.
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