Displaying items by tag: school of medicine

Ovarian cancer is known as the “silent killer” due to the difficulty in early detection because most women do not have any early symptoms.
The modified mRNA — delivered after experimental heart attacks — transiently allows heart muscle cells to proliferate, leading to reduced infarct size and improved heart performance compared to untreated animals.
While preventive treatment with vigabatrin delayed the onset and prevalence of infantile spasms in TSC infants, it had no impact on focal seizures, drug-resistant epilepsy, or improvement of cognitive and behavioral scores at 24 months.
UAB researchers make a case for utilizing telehealth technologies in the care of injured rural patients stating that teletrauma can improve access to trauma care for rural patients.
Rachel Smith, Ph.D., professor in the UAB School of Engineering and principal investigator in the Neural Signal Processing and Modeling lab, was recently awarded multiple grants to fund research in seizure onset localization.
Undergoing surgery can be a highly stressful time for patients and families. Surgeons at UAB work with a team of health care providers to guide patients through the surgery process and provide high-quality, personalized care.
Since 1985, the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study has examined the factors that contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease to better understand the natural history of cardiovascular disease over the adult life course.
These results add an additional, mechanistic aspect to further explain how the decades-old blood pressure medication verapamil can preserve beta cell function in Type 1 diabetes patients by affecting the hormone insulin-like growth factor 1.
This is the first direct evidence that resident microbiota can have a significant impact on the establishment and pathology of infection by two different human-specific pathogens.
UAB Medicine has added the ExcelsiusGPS® by Globus Medical for minimally invasive spine surgeries.
TCE is a known environmental risk factor for parkinsonism. UAB researchers will evaluate whether T cell activation caused by TCE exposure leads to cognitive decline.
The study, funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, will compare two pathways of post-fracture patient care.
Some individuals may experience a range of somatic or physical symptoms, such as persistent tension or nervousness, as the weekend comes to an end, also known as the “Monday blues” or “Sunday scaries.”
The project will empower a wide range of users to implement the next generation of genomic analysis, smart querying of medical literature, neuro-symbolic AI with stochastic reasoning, graph analytics, software verification tasks and security auditing.
The new treatment involves using a spinal cord stimulator that sends electrical impulses into the spinal cord. The device responds to the spinal cord in real time and can adjust the electrical output 50-100 times per second based on what is happening in the spinal cord.
This study, performed in a pre-clinical human model, is the first time xenotransplanted pig kidneys have shown clearance of creatinine and shown a standard immunosuppression regimen may be sufficient.
Some PD-1+CXCR5+CD4+ T cells will become germinal center-Tfh cells that are essential for B cells to become high-affinity antibody-producing cells. Others do not take that path, instead becoming memory T cells.
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