The UAB School of Optometry is participating in a study investigating the effectiveness of amblyopia treatment using an iPad video game as an alternative to traditional patching, and recently participated in a multi-centered randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of vision therapy for children with convergence insufficiency on reading and attention.

Learn more: Pediatric Vision Research

Binocular Computer Activities for Treatment of Amblyopia

The UAB School of Optometry is participating in a study investigating the effectiveness of amblyopia treatment using an iPad video game as an alternative to traditional patching. The iPad game requires the child to use both eyes together to play the game. While traditional treatments of amblyopia, which is sometimes called “lazy eye,” blur or block the vision of the “good” eye with drops or a patch, the iPad game stimulates both eyes at the same time (binocularly). Some early studies have shown that this treatment approach may be very effective in children. This study is being done to compare the new binocular treatment with traditional patching therapy.

What is amblyopia?

Amblyopia is the medical term that means the vision is decreased because despite the eye being healthy, one or both eyes failed to develop normal vision. Amblyopia is one of the most common causes of decreased vision in children. Sometimes amblyopia is caused by crossing in or turning out of the eyes. Other times this is caused by a difference in the prescription between the two eyes (such as nearsightedness or farsightedness). Treatment of amblyopia generally involves making the child use the 'weak' eye. This is most often done either by having the child wear a patch over the "good" eye or by putting an eye drop in the good eye to blur the vision.

How to participate

To be eligible for this study, your child must have amblyopia in one eye and be between 4 and 6 years old. There are additional criteria for enrollment that can be measured by one of the study doctors. This study is being conducted by the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group (PEDIG) which is a collaborative group of eye doctors around the country supported by the National Institutes of Health. The study plans to enroll approximately 230 children across the United States. Information learned from this study will help doctors learn more about effective treatment of amblyopia.

For more information about the study, please contact:
Dr. Kristine Hopkins
Office: 205-996-1678
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Study Coordinator: 205-996-0203