Archaeologist Sarah Parcak giving her TED talkThe Department of Anthropology is providing clues to reducing conflict at home and around the world.

Research and excavations by archeologist Sarah Parcak, Ph.D., winner of the 2016 TED Prize, have uncovered people and places many believed were lost forever.

With the use of satellite remote sensing, a field that has transformed our ability to rediscover and understand ancient civilization, Parcak and her team have satellite mapped all of Egypt and unearthed 17 potential unknown pyramids (adding to the 138 known ones), 1,000 tombs and 3,100 settlements. She and her team have also uncovered thousands of additional ancient sites across Europe, the Mediterranean, and the North Atlantic, and used satellite technology to map extensive looting in post-Revolution Egypt.

The launch of Parcak's citizen science and archaeology platform, which allows anyone with an internet connection to review satellite imagery to search for looted sites and discover sites previously unknown to modern archaeologists, has propelled the team’s ongoing work to locate—and protect—the world’s cultural heritage from destruction and looting.

The Department of History and the African American Studies Program lead the College in bringing some of the country's most renowned public intellectuals and scholars to UAB. During the 2018-2019 academic year, African American Studies hosted both Nikki Giovanni and Imani Perry; History welcomed Pulitzer prize-winning author Jack E. Davis and military historian Peter Guardino, Ph.D. The Department of History also recently celebrated the 25th anniversary of its highly-regarded journal, Vulcan Historical Review.