Bachelor of Science in Immunology

Note to Students:

The following course requirements and descriptions are temporary pending full inclusion in the UAB Undergraduate Catalog.

Immunology majors complete 93 hours of courses in the Immunology program. Required courses are:

Basic chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism, genetics, evolution, bacteria, and protists. 4 hours.
The course emphasizes the transition from cell, to tissue, to organs in multicellular systems. Specific attention in the course will be paid to a survey of the various groups of plants, fungi, invertebrates and vertebrates. Strong emphasis will be placed on comparing the anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems in humans with those of other organisms. The course is designed to expand the students understanding of the process of scientific writing. 4 hours.
Principles and mechanisms of inheritance; structure, action, and regulation of genes; molecular genetic technology and application to human health and agriculture. Preparation for advanced courses in biology. 3 hours.
Microbiology with emphasis on molecular aspects of microbial cell structure, function, and diversity. Host defense mechanisms, infectious disease, and microbial ecology. Preparation for advanced courses in biology. 4 hours.
Prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene structure and function. 3 hours.
Biological molecules and metabolic processes; energetics; synthesis and regulation of macromolecules; differential gene expression; membranes and organelles; cytoskeleton; cell cycle and growth of normal and neoplastic cells. 3 hours.
The lecture and laboratory course uses humans as a model system to investigate physiological processes occurring at cell, tissue, organ, and system levels. Additionally the use of experimental examples and laboratory experiments and the interpretation of data will be used to understand all aspects of productivity. The class is designed to improve scientific writing skills related to research experiment. 4 hours.
Systems biology is an inter-disciplinary study underlying complex biological processes as integrated systems of many interacting components. This course will give students a foundation in understanding complex biological interactions at the molecular, network and genomic level. This course will cover state-of-the-art high throughput established and novel approaches used in genome sequencing, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics to obtain, integrate and analyze complex data. The students will also get familiar with knowledge on experimental perturbation of genomes, gene regulatory networks, comparative genomics and evolution, basic bioinformatics. This course will be a combination of text based lectures and discussions of the current literature relevant to Functional Genomics and Systems Biology. 3 hours.
Immune system and functions of host humoral and cellular immune responses. Mechanisms of antigen and antibody reactions and basic immunological methods. 3 hours.
BY 492: Research project under supervision of faculty sponsor. Student must enroll for 4 credit hours and must have senior standing. Students who enroll in this course as their capstone experience will be required to do additional work to fulfill their biology capstone requirement.  4 hours.
BY 493: Research project under supervision of faculty sponsor. You must enroll in 4 credit hours and you must have senior standing. Students that identify this course as their capstone experience will be required to do additional work to fulfill their biology capstone requirement. 4 hours.
CH 115: Stoichiometry, quantum theory, atomic structure, chemical bonding, acids-bases, colligative properties and periodicity. Laboratory emphasizes quantitative analysis. Writing assignments structured to build on scientific reasoning.  4 hours.
CH 116: Emphasizes development of laboratory skills and quantitative analyses related to CH 115. Writing assignments structured to build on scientific reasoning. 4 hours.
CH 117: Solutions, chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium and special topics (organic, biochemistry, descriptive chemistry) Writing assignments structured to build on scientific reasoning. 4 hours.
CH 118: Emphasizes development of laboratory skills and quantitative analyses related to CH 117. Writing assignments structured to build on scientific reasoning. 4 hours.
CH 235: Structure, nomenclature, properties, and reactivity of compounds with various organic functional groups: alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alkyl halides and alcohols. Emphasis on the mechanisms of organic reactions and problem solving. 4 hours.
CH 236: Techniques of organic chemistry. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. 4 hours.
CH 237: Reactions of aromatic compounds and carbonyl containing functional groups: aldehydes, ketones, acids, esters and amides. Molecules of biological interest, such as proteins and carbohydrates. 4 hours.
CH 238: Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds using instrumental analysis and identification of unknowns. 4 hours.
Overview of biochemical principles; chemistry of aqueous solutions, biochemical building blocks including amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleotides; examination of metabolic pathways and enzymes that mediate catabolic and anabolic metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleic acids. Application of clinical correlations of metabolism to human nutrition and disease. 3 hours.
Limit of a function; continuity, derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric exponential, and logarithmic functions, application of derivative to extremal problems, optimization, and graphing; Newton method; the definite integral and its application to area problems; fundamental theorem of integral calculus, average value, and substitution rule. 4 hours.
Descriptive and inferential statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing. 3 hours.
This course will introduce the cells, receptors, signaling pathways and soluble mediators associated with the innate immune response. The basic components of the innate immune system will then be discussed in the context of their role in the physical, physiological, phagocytic and inflammatory barriers that comprise the innate immune system. Importantly, emphasis will be placed on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that are used by the innate immune system to detect and respond to microbial pathogens to provide the first line of defense. 3 hours.
This course will provide an in-depth analysis of the cells (T, B and antigen presenting cells), tissues (primary and secondary) and soluble factors (cytokines and chemokines) that comprise the adaptive humoral immune response. The course will examine how cells of the adaptive immune system discriminate self from non-self, including the nature of antigen receptors, the types of antigens recognized and the signals involved in the generation of effector cells that mediate the response. 3 hours.
This course will provide an overview of major concepts related to virulence mechanisms utilized by microbial pathogens and their effect on the host immune response. Emphasis will be placed on important virulence factors/mechanisms associated with bacterial, viral and fungal pathogens and how these alter various components of the innate and adaptive immune responses to allow escape of the pathogen and its survival. This course will introduce the concept of emerging infectious diseases and how their spread is related to their ability to escape detection by the immune system. 3 hours.
This course will focus on the role of the immune system, including the molecular and cellular processes, that contribute to morbidity and mortality associated with immunodeficiency (congenital and acquired), asthma/allergy, autoimmunity (systemic and organ-specific), transplantation and inflammatory syndromes associated with heart disease, cancer, chronic neurological disease and diabetes. 3 hours.
This course is being developed as a seminar course by the Department of Microbiology. The goal of this seminar course is to present basic concepts in immunology as they relate to important current issues. The importance of the immune system in health and disease will be highlighted. 1 hour.
This course is being developed as a seminar course by the Department of Microbiology. This new seminar will feature a 30 minute introduction of a new basic concept in immunology followed by a 15 minute presentation from an individual faculty member who does research on basic concept and a 15 minute discussion session once a week for the Fall and Spring Semesters. 1 hour.
College Physics I: First term of non-calculus based physics. Linear and planar motion, Newton's laws, work and energy, gravitation, momentum, rigid body motion, elasticity, oscillations, waves, sound, fluids, ideal gases, heat and thermodynamics. 4 hours.
College Physics II: Second term of non-calculus based physics. Electricity and magnetism, optics, and modern physics. 4 hours.
General Physics I: First term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering classical mechanics: measurements, kinematics, vectors, translational and rotational dynamics, work, energy, momentum, statics, oscillatory motion, wave motion, and sound. Lecture and laboratory. 4 hours.
General Physics II: Second term of introductory, calculus-based general physics sequence covering electricity and magnetism: Coulomb's Law, electric fields, Gauss' Law, potential, capacitors and dielectrics, Ohm's Law, DC circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere's Law, Biot-Savart Law, Faraday's Law, inductance, AC circuits, geometrical and physical optics. 4 hours.
BY 398: Research project under supervision of faculty sponsor. 1-3 hours.
BY 498: Research project for students admitted to Honors Research Program. 1-6 hours.


Undergraduate Catalog

Learn more about the program as well as course prerequisites, the UAB Core Curriculum, and other requirements in the UAB Undergraduate Catalog.

Questions?

For more information on the program or if you have any specific questions not answered on this website, please contact us.