grand rounds 1 

Curriculum Overview

In the UAB Pediatric Residency Program, our curriculum is aimed at providing a superb foundation in general pediatrics. This foundation fully prepares residents for future careers both in outpatient general pediatrics and for subspecialty training. Our graduates and those who employ them consistently report that our program has fully prepared them for fellowship or for independent practice. Over the last 10 years, about half of UAB Pediatric graduates have entered general pediatrics settings, while the other half have gone on to academic subspecialty fellowships.

UAB graduates are leaders in their fields. Department chairs, residency program directors, division directors, biomedical researchers, NIH Study Section Chairs, journal editors, a past president of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and countless community pediatric leaders got their start in the UAB residency program.

Sample Block Schedules

PGY-1

Block 1

Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Block 2

Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Block 3

Subspecialty Rotation
(GI/Pulm/HemOnc or Renal)

Block 4

Subspecialty Rotation
(GI/Pulm/HemOnc or Renal)

Block 5

Newborn Hospital Medicine

Block 6

Primary Care/
Injury Prevention-Child Advocacy

Block 7

Night Float

Block 8

Night Float

Block 9

NICU

Block 10

NICU (2 weeks)
Community Pediatrics (1 week)

Block 11

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Block 12

Elective

Continuity Clinics

Average one half-day of clinic per week

Vacation/Time Off

Three weeks total taken during Elective, RNICU/Community Pediatrics and Primary Care/ Injury Prevention-Child Advocacy Months.

Holiday Comp Week- 1 week unscheduled per year during Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s & 1 week unscheduled at end of year.

For more information about nights and call click below for a PDF of the sample block schedule.

PGY-2

Block 1

Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Block 2

Adolescent

Block 3

Subspecialty Individualized
Curriculum

Block 4

Subspecialty Individualized
Curriculum

Block 5

Developmental & Behavioral
Pediatrics

Block 6

Elective

Block 7

Night Float

Block 8

NICU

Block 9

PICU

Block 10

PICU

Block 11

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Block 12

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Continuity Clinics

Average one half-day of clinic per week

Vacation/Time Off

Three weeks total taken during Pediatric Emergency Medicine and Elective Months.

Holiday Comp Week- 1 week unscheduled per year during Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s.

For more information about nights and call click below for a PDF of the sample block schedule.

PGY-3

Block 1

Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Block 2

Pediatric Hospital Medicine

Block 3

Subspecialty Individualized
Curriculum

Block 4

Subspecialty Individualized
Curriculum

Block 5

Subspecialty Individualized
Curriculum

Block 6

Health Department

Block 7

Night Float

Block 8

NICU

Block 9

Elective

Block 10

Elective

Block 11

Subspecialty Clinics

Block 12

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Continuity Clinics

Average one half-day of clinic per week

Vacation/Time Off

Three weeks total taken during Subspecialty Clinic and Elective Months.

Holiday Comp Week- 1 week unscheduled per year during Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s.

For more information about nights and call click below for a PDF of the sample block schedule.


Rotation Overview

Inpatient Pediatrics at Children's of Alabama

Inpatient teams are resident-led teams, even when rounding with a fellow. Residents lead family-centered rounds and develop and implement plans for patient care. Attending physicians are present each day on rounds to for supervision, guidance, and education. On services with fellows, fellows assist in the supervision and teaching of residents and students.

Additional educational opportunities each weekday include Morning Report at 8 a.m. and Noon Conference or Pediatric Medical Grand Rounds.

Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM)

Pediatric Hospital Medicine teams provide care for about 1/3 of the inpatient admissions at Children's of Alabama. Because Children's of Alabama is both the local children's hospital for the greater Birmingham area and the referral center for all of Alabama and parts of neighboring states, the PHM service cares for a diverse patient population with a wide range of diagnoses.

  • Attendings are members of the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine and are leaders in education, quality improvement, and advocacy at UAB and nationally.

  • Each PHM team consists of an attending, three pediatric residents and 1-3 medical students

  • Each team is also assigned a social worker, case manager, and pharmacist to assist with follow-up appointments, patient teaching, working with DHR, coordinating prescriptions, along with many other services

  • Each team has a cap of 16 patients with a max of 8 patients admitted on a call day

  • Patients are admitted to PHM teams using a “drip system” in which each team can get new patients daily. Overflow patients are admitted by the hospitalist team

  • A separate night float team is in house at 5 pm to perform cross-cover and admissions

  • Residents present interesting patients for Stagno Morning Report 2-3 times during the month

  • Ward teams participate in monthly simulation cases to enhance their learning. 

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

The pediatric emergency medicine rotation consists of shifts ranging from 4-12 hours in duration. Like most urban children’s hospitals, the emergency department (ED) cares for a wide array of problems ranging from routine pediatric concerns to acute, life-threatening traumas and illnesses. The total number of patient visits to the Children’s of Alabama ED in 2019 was 74,113, with 413 level 1 and 2 traumas of which 28% were level 1 traumas. During the emergency department rotation, residents provide initial contact and care with supervision from fellowship-trained, pediatric emergency medicine specialists. The Children’s of Alabama ED is equipped with 54 single-patient rooms, along with 4 state-of-the-art trauma bays.

Outpatient Pediatrics

Residents spend, on average, ½ day a week in Continuity Clinic at the Primary Care Clinic. The Primary Care Clinic is located in the Park Place building, a building directly adjacent to the hospital. Residents serve as the general pediatricians for children from the surrounding community and are each assigned a patient panel of approximately 100 patients, ranging from newborns to 18-year-olds, with a variety of medical problems. Residents also enjoy working with the same primary care clinic pediatrician as their attending throughout the 3 years of residency. 

As part of the outpatient pediatric education, residents also rotate through various outpatient clinics including adolescent medicine, Sparks Center at UAB, sub-specialty clinics at Children’s of Alabama, Jefferson County Health Department community care clinics, along with a number of community private pediatric offices.

Adolescent Medicine

All residents complete a one month experience in adolescent medicine. This rotation provides the basis for evaluation and care of this special pediatric population. Training locations include the inpatient and outpatient facilities of the Children’s of Alabama as well as focused instruction in eating disorders clinic, juvenile detention centers, weight management clinics, adolescent HIV clinics, adolescent gynecology clinics, and a teen transition clinic.

Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

An understanding of typical and atypical behavior and development are key foundations of training in pediatrics. A one month experience in developmental and behavioral pediatrics is required for all residents. Subspecialty clinics are the backbone of this rotation. Clinics in which residents participate include Autism Clinic, Trisomy 21 Clinic, Muscular Dystrophy Clinic, Newborn Follow-up Clinic for former premature infants, Spina Bifida Clinic, and sessions with occupational and physical therapy.

Neonatal Medicine and Intensive Care

Residents in their first year of training spend one month caring for infants on the Mother-Baby Unit of UAB's Women and Infant's Center. Goals of this rotation include developing skills in the evaluation and care of healthy newborns. Residents gain expertise in newborn physical exam and circumcision skills and on the topics of neonatal jaundice, sepsis, feeding difficulty, breastfeeding, evaluation of heart murmurs, and anticipatory guidance.

A total of 3.5 months during residency is spent in the 120 bed, level III+ Regional Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (RNICU), also located at UAB’s Women and Infant’s Center. As one of the largest and busiest NICU’s in the nation, residents can expect to see a wide range of patients ranging from extremely low birth weight infants to critically ill full-term neonates. Residents attend all high risk or otherwise complicated deliveries and thus become proficient at resuscitating newborns on this rotation. Additionally, residents have the opportunity to perform numerous procedures including intubations, umbilical line placement, and lumbar punctures. Residents are also exposed to the management and care of neonates with cardiac lesions while in the NICU. While in the NICU, overnight call occurs for residents every 4th night. Interns work on a night float system while in the NICU, with an average of 4-6 overnight shifts during the rotation and the remainder of the month is comprised of day shifts.

Pediatric Intensive Care

Second-year pediatric residents spend two months in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) at Children’s of Alabama. This 24-bed unit provides state-of-the-art, critical care for the sickest children in the state and region. Residents gain in-depth experience in the identification and management of respiratory and cardiac failure, treatment of sepsis, management of severe trauma, post-operative complications and a wide range of other disorders. This experience provides confidence to manage sick patients for the remainder of our residents' careers. Residents also hone their procedural skills with intubations, line placement and other diagnostic procedures during these rotations. Care is supervised by Pediatric Critical Care trained faculty.

Pediatric Subspecialty Rotations (Children's of Alabama and University Hospital)

The UAB Pediatric Residency Program offers subspecialty exposure to the full array of pediatric experiences. Subspecialty rotations include hematology-oncology, pulmonary, nephrology, allergy-immunology, rheumatology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, infectious disease, neurology, cardiology, and genetics.  Subspecialty rotations are spread throughout the three years of training. During these months residents experience inpatient and outpatient care.

Click below for our elective catalog.


Scholars Programs

The UAB Pediatric Residency Program offers four scholars programs to provide residents the opportunity to gain expereince in the target areas of medical education, health disparities, global health and rural health. Click on the program title below to learn more about each program. 

Pediatric Residents Interested in Medical Education (PRIME) Scholars

Pediatric Residents Interested in Medical Education (PRIME) Scholars is a longitudinal learning experience designed to provide pediatric residents with skills and knowledge to become excellent medical educators. Components of the program include: 1) monthly group discussions, 2) direct observation of resident teaching, and 3) scholarly projects.

Pediatrics PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents and Med-Peds PGY-2 through PGY-4 residents are eligble for the program. The application and selection process takes place in the Spring. Two to three residents per year will be selected for the program.

Goals

To provide opportunities for residents with a particular interest in medical education (e.g. those that wish to pursue a career in academics with focus on medical education or perhaps incorporate medical education into their clinical practice if not in academics) to:

  • gain exposure to foundational principles of medical education (including adult learning theory)

  • increase knowledge and skills related to common practices in medical education (e.g. feedback delivery)

  • gain perspective on/learn about different career tracks in medical education

  • gain a basic appreciation for research in medical education

Faculty Leaders

Will Sasser, M.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care
Assistant Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program

Michele Nichols, M.D.
Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program

Nancy Tofil, M.D.
Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care
Senior Associate Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program

Christina Cochran, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Assistant Program Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellowship Program

Anna Hurst, M.D.
Associate Professor, Department of Genetics
Assistant Program Director, Combined Pediatric-Genetics Residency Program

Annalise Sorrentino, M.D.
Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Health Equity Scholars Program

The aim of the Health Equity Scholars Program is to train pediatric and medicine-pediatric residents to lead advances in child health equity through a two-year longitudinal and experiential curriculum.

The program will give priority to Pediatrics and MedPeds PGY-1 residents since it is a two-year curriculum but is open to upper level residents if there are spots available. The application and selection process takes place in the Spring. Three residents will be selected for the program each application cycle.

Goals

The goal is for Health Equity Scholars to:

    • Become pediatricians with outstanding clinical skills who also understand the full range of determinants of health and systemic barriers that lead to inequities in health care.

    • Develop a foundational knowledge of resources available to overcome systemic barriers in health care to ensure exceptional, equitable care is provided to vulnerable and underserved populations.

    • Develop leadership, communication, scholarship and advocacy skills to advance health equity.

    • Learn to design, implement, and evaluate interventions through quality improvement initiatives to improve child health equity.

    • Become familiar with implicit biases and recognize the impact biases have on promoting health inequities.

    • Develop a framework for addressing implicit biases in an effort to improve health equity for vulnerable and underserved populations.

Curriculum Overview

  • Monthly didactic and experiential learning sessions.

  • Group QI Project

  • Two weekend long immersive experiences in regions of Alabama per year (Fall and Spring).

Faculty Leaders

Morissa Ladinsky, M.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Academic General Pediatrics

Chrystal Rutledge, M.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care

Tina Simpson, M.D.
Professor, Division of Adolescent Medicine

Pediatric Underserved and Global Health (PUGH) Scholars Program

The Pediatric Underserved and Global Health (PUGH) Scholars Program is a unique opportunity for pediatric residents to gain experience and focused education in global health during the 3 years of residency training. We are looking for residents with a passion for practicing medicine in underserved communities to reduce healthcare disparities and a desire to experience global health both here in the U.S. and abroad. Residents will gain an understanding of the general principles related to health in developing countries and providing culturally sensitive and competent care in a limited resource setting. 

The program will give priority to Pediatrics and MedPeds PGY-1 residents but is open to upper level residents if there are spots available. The application and selection process takes place in the Spring. Three residents will be selected for the program each application cycle. 

Goals

  • To provide structured education for pediatric residents surrounding global health principles

  • To prepare residents to address healthcare delivery and work to eliminate healthcare disparities in the global underserved population

  • To provide mentorship for a career in global heath as well as pre-departure planning and scholarship oversight

  • To recruit strong resident applicants interested in global health.

  • To foster longitudinal partnerships with global sites for bidirectional mentorship, education, and research

Curriculum

  • Attend at least 2/3 of the global health meetings

    1. Quarterly Global Health Noon Conference

    2. Quarterly Global Health Morning Report

    3. Global Health Interest Group Meetings

  • Spend your non-call elective during 3rd year in an underserved setting (either here in the U.S. or overseas)

    1. Target overseas sites: Kijabe, Kenya; Santiago, Chile (2021-2022 academic year); Lusaka, Zambia

    2. US sites: Indian Health Services; Black Belt, Alabama; Health Department; other rural Alabama location

    3. Other sites may be acceptable on case by case basis

  • Complete a scholarly project (anything from a reflective essay to an advocacy, QI, or research project)

Faculty Leaders

Meghan Hofto, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Pediaric Hospital Medicine

Mary Orr, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Pediaric Hospital Medicine

Nora Switchenko, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Neonatology

Erica Bjornstad, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Pediaric Nephrology

Carmelle Wallace, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Division of Pediaric Emergency Medicine

Priya Prabhakaran, M.D.
Professor, Division of Pediatric Critical Care

McDonald Scholars Program

The McDonald Scholars Program provides the opportunity for interested residents to enhance their general pediatric experience in rural/underserved areas through two week immersion experience. Selected residents will be placed in an established rural and/or underserved pediatric practice in Alabama where they will have the opportunity to be an observer and a patient caregiver. 

The program is open to PGY-2 and PGY-3 Pediatric or PGY-2 through PGY-4 Med-Peds residents and accepts applications in the Spring. Four to eight residents will be selected each year to participate in the program. 

Goals

  • To give residents an “immersion” type experience in a rural practice in Alabama

  • To provide and engage our residents in a different underserved population

  • To strengthen the General Pediatric experience of our residents

  • To inspire and possibly peak interest in a rural type practice

  • To honor the generous giving of Dr. and Mrs. Jack McDonald.

Faculty Leaders

Michele Nichols, M.D.
Professor, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program

Candice Dye, M.D.
Associate Professor, Division of Academic General Pediatric
Associate Program Director, Pediatric Residency Program


Simulation Education

residentsimwebsizeThe Pediatric Simulation Center was established in 2007 to provide physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, students, and other health care professionals with opportunities to perform common medical procedures and respond to both rare and common Pediatric conditions, along with life-threatening emergencies using patient simulators. The Simulation Center creates a safe, realistic environment which allows residents to increase their knowledge, hone their skills, and practice teamwork in the context of simulated patient scenarios.

Interns are introduced to the Simulation Center during orientation with simulated check-out of patients, care of ill children, and procedures including: lumbar punctures, I/O placement, intubations, umbilical line placement, etc. Simulation continues throughout residency during most inpatient months. For example, residents in the PICU (during 2nd year) attend a weekly Critical Care Simulation. Mock codes (using the Simulation Center simulators) are also performed on a monthly basis in various locations around the hospital.

The Simulation Center is always growing. Currently, it has 9 patient simulators ranging from Premie Newborn to Teenager. The Simulation Center is the only pediatric simulation center in the state of Alabama. Over 6,000 health care professionals rotate through each year, and it has educated over 25,000 people to date.

For more information on the Simulation Center click here.


Daily Education 

Stagno Morning Report

IMG 0100

On June 18, 2014, the UAB Pediatrics Residency Program renamed Morning Report to Stagno Report in honor of Dr. Sergio Stagno for his dedication to the residency program and the education of residents. The Stagno Report takes place every morning at 7:55 in the Bradley Lecture Center. Cases are generally presented by upper level residents and led by the chief residents. Residents on GIPS, subspecialty rotations, PICU and NICU all present on a rotating basis, discussing a wide variety of cases. Ethics Stagno Report occurs once a month. The Stagno Report is always well attended by residents, medical students, fellows, and attendings alike. It is interactive with resident and attending participation concerning the history, physical exam, differential diagnosis, and management of the case. Because of these aspects, an engaging discussion takes place every morning, with multiple learning points.

Outpatient Stagno Report is held every Wednesday at 7:30am. Residents who are on outpatient rotations lead and participate in the Outpatient Stagno Report. Breakfast is also provided for those in attendance. Community pediatricians and faculty are invited, but this is specifically a resident and intern led activity, usually discussing an outpatient pediatric topicJournal Club takes place once a month during outpatient Stagno report, allowing residents to develop skills necessary to critically review medical literature.

Noon Conference

Noon conference takes place every Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday in the Bradley Lecture Center. Residents are provided with a free, hot meal on a daily basis during these lectures. In addition, all residents’ pagers are held and answered by the chief residents so that the residents will be able to spend the hour focused on the lecture. Noon conferences are given by faculty and staff. The material covered is based on a 12-month curriculum created by the curriculum committee that covers Pediatric Board Specifications from each subspecialty. 

In July of each year, there is a special series presented that covers basic patient care and emergency situations among the Pediatric subspecialties, to provide a foundation of knowledge for residents and interns.

Senior Talks are given once per month, and take place during the noon conference hour. Two of the senior residents (third-year categorical pediatrics and fourth-year med/peds residents) present a 30 minute evidence-based medicine talk on a topic of their choice.


Board Preparation

From 2012-2019, we have had a 99% Board pass rate. 

In addition to exposure to a wide breadth and depth of patients and excellent teaching by our attendings and fellows, we also have several programs in place in our curriculum to help prepare for the Pediatric Boards:

Board Review Series

Starting in January, we have weekly lectures from attendings and fellows from every department, to go over Pearls and Tips for the Boards in their Specialty. Many of them write questions for the Boards and offer insight into the test itself. After the lecture, the Powerpoint is available on our residents’ home website.

American Academy of Pediatrics PREP®

The Residency Department pays for your AAP membership while you are a resident which gives you access to at least three years of PREP questions. You are required to do a year’s worth of PREP questions every year of residency (270 questions per year). The journal Pediatrics and Peds-in-Review are both delivered on a monthly basis to all of our residents, which is a great source of review for basic pediatrics topics.

Pediatrics in Review®

Every resident receives a subscription, receiving the journal monthly. Another way to stay up to date within Pediatrics.

Question of the Day

Every morning before morning report, we do a PREP-like question. The intern and resident with the most correct answers in a 6 month period have the opportunity to go to lunch with Dr. Cohen, the Pediatrics Department Chair.